(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Advanced Microdevices Manuals | Linear Circuits Manuals | Supertex Manuals | Sundry Manuals | Echelon Manuals | RCA Manuals | National Semiconductor Manuals | Hewlett Packard Manuals | Signetics Manuals | Fluke Manuals | Datel Manuals | Intersil Manuals | Zilog Manuals | Maxim Manuals | Dallas Semiconductor Manuals | Temperature Manuals | SGS Manuals | Quantum Electronics Manuals | STDBus Manuals | Texas Instruments Manuals | IBM Microsoft Manuals | Grammar Analysis | Harris Manuals | Arrow Manuals | Monolithic Memories Manuals | Intel Manuals | Fault Tolerance Manuals | Johns Hopkins University Commencement | PHOIBLE Online | International Rectifier Manuals | Rectifiers scrs Triacs Manuals | Standard Microsystems Manuals | Additional Collections | Control PID Fuzzy Logic Manuals | Densitron Manuals | Philips Manuals | The Andhra Pradesh Legislative Assembly Debates | Linear Technologies Manuals | Cermetek Manuals | Miscellaneous Manuals | Hitachi Manuals | The Video Box | Communication Manuals | Scenix Manuals | Motorola Manuals | Agilent Manuals
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The independent film & video monthly"

IlfjL7I 




January/February 1996 
VOLUME 19, NUMBER 1 

Publisher: Ruby Lerner 

Editor in Chief: Patricia Thomson 

Managing Editor: Sue Young Wilson 

Editorial Assistant: Adam Knee 

Intern: Sonia Sabnis 

Contributing Editors: Kathryn Bowser, Luke Hones, 

Barbara Bliss Osborn, Robert L. Seigel, Esq. 

Art Director: Daniel Christmas 

Advertising: Laura D. Davis (212) 807-1400 

National Distribution: Total Circulation (Manhattan) 

(201) 342-6334; Fine Print (800) 874-7082; 

Ingram Periodicals (800) 627-6247 

Printed in the USA by Lancaster Press 

The Independent Film & Video Monthly (ISSN 0731-5198) 
is published monthly except February and September by 
the Foundation for Independent Video and Film (FIVF), a 
nonprofit, tax-exempt educational foundation dedicated 
to the promotion of video and film. Subscription to the 
magazine ($45/yr individual; $25/yr student; $75/yr 
library; $1 00/yr nonprofit organization; $1 50/yr busi- 
ness/industry) is included in annual membership dues 
paid to the Association of Independent Video and 
Filmmakers (AIVF), the national trade association of indi- 
viduals involved in independent media, 304 Hudson St., 6 
fl., New York, NY 10013, (212) 807-1400; fax: (212) 463- 
8519; aivffivf@aol.com. Second Class Postage Paid at 
New York, NY, and at additional mailing offices. POST- 
MASTER: Send address changes to The Independent Film & 

Video Monthly, 304 Hudson St., 6 fl,, NY, NY 10013. 
Publication of an advertisement in The Independent does 
not constitute an endorsement. AIVF/FIVF are not respon- 
sible for any claims made in an ad. Letters to The 
Independent Film & Video Monthly should be addressed 
to the editor. Letters may be edited for length. All con- 
tents are copyright of the Foundation for Independent 
Video and Film, Inc. Reprints require written permission 
and acknowledgement of the article's previous appear- 
ance in The Independent. The Independent is indexed in 
the Alternative Press Index. 

© Foundation for Independent Video and Film, 1996 

AIVF/FIVF staff: Ruby Lerner, executive director; Cleo 
Cacoulidis, advocacy coordinator; Pamela Calvert; direc- 
tor of programs and services; Leslie Fields, membership 
coordinator; Judah Friedlander, membership associate; 
Susan Kennedy, resource/development director; John 
McNair, information services associate; Leslie Singer, 
director of administration; Lisa DeanneSmith, resource/ 
development associate. 

AIVF/FIVF legal counsel: Robert L. Freedman, Esq., Leavy, 
Rosensweig & Hyman 

AIVF/FIVF Board of Directors: Carrol Parrott Blue, Melissa 
Burch, Loni Ding, Barbara Hammer, Ruby Lerner (ex offi- 
cio), James Klein, Diane Markrow, Robb Moss, Robert 
Richter, James Schamus*, Norman Wang*, Barton Weiss, 
Debra Zimmerman, Susan Wittenberg. 

* FIVF Board of Directors only 



ok 



2 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 



44 



Squaring Off Over Tiananmen: Critics Clamor at 
The Gate of Heavenly Peace 

It may never be possible to establish exactly what happened on 
June 4, 1989, in Tiananmen Square. But Carma Hinton and Richard 
Gordon have come close — and are making both the Chinese 
Government and student leaders squirm. 

by Jerry White 




36 A Guide to Self Distribution: The Secrets to Many 
Happy Returns 

Can't get a theatrical distribution deal? Don't despair. Doing it yourself is 
not only possible, but sometimes preferable. 

by Joe Berlinger 




4 Publishers Note 
7 Media News 

NEA on the Edge: Discipline 
Programs Dismantled 

by Cleo Cacoulidis 

Will the FCC Go Next? 

BY GlGI B. SOHN 

R.I.R: The 90s Channel 

by Sue Young Wilson 

Director Alleges Censorship 
in Post-Communist Poland 

by Karen Rosenberg 



13 Talking Heads 

Jean Roy: 

Cannes' Critics Week 

by Howard Feinstein 

Jane Balfour: 
Foreign Sales Agent 

by Michele Shapiro 

Kathleen Dore: Executive VP 
& General Manager, 
Bravo/Independent Film 
Channel 

by Minne J.M. Hong 

Carl Goodman: Curator of 
Digital Media, American 
Museum of the Moving Image 

by Sue Young Wilson 

20 Wired Blue Yonder 

Media Over-Loader-. 

A Documentarian Goes Digital 

by Sue Young Wilson 

Kodak's On-Line Shortcut for 
Location Scouts 

by Yosha Goldstein 



COVER: Dawn "Wienerdog" 

Weiner (Heather Matarazzo) 

endures the cruelty of her 

classmates and indifference 

of her parents in Todd 

Solondz's Welcome to the 

Dollhotise, one of the hot 

tickets at the Toronto 

International Film Festival. 

Courtesy Sony Pictures 
Classics 






Composer Contact! Plays 
Musical Matchmaker 

by Steve Janas 

Tech Heads and Artists Unite 
at SIGGRAPH '95 

by Robin Reidy Oppenheimer 



28 Field Reports 

Toronto Turns 20 

by Patricia Thomson 

Write 'Em, Cowboy: The 
Austin Heart of Film Festival 
& Screenwriters' Conference 

by James Shelton 

On the Short Form: 

Four Distributors Take Stock 

of the Market for Shorts 

by Max J. Alvarez 

Shorts Stories from 
Sundance 

by Dana Harris 

55 In Focus 

More Power to You: 
The Media 100 Nonlinear 
Editing System 

by Rob Rownd 

59 Cue&A with Jonathan 



Stack by adam k 



NEE 



60 Festivals by kathryn bowser 70 Classifieds 
73 Notices 80 Memoranda by Pamela calvert 



Publisher's Note 

Dear AIVF members and readers of The Independent: 

Welcome to the first issue of the 19th year of The Independent Film & Video Monthly. 
We've made a number of design and editorial changes to the magazine over the past few 
years, and are in the process of redesigning our cover. 

As a result of the changes we've been making, advertising revenues have increased 
by 74 percent since FY92, allowing us to take the magazine from an average of 48 pages 
to the current average of 68 pages — and growing (the issue in your hands is the largest 
ever). Newsstand sales have also increased 67 percent. Thanks to all our advertisers 
and readers for making this growth happen. 

Organizationally, 1995 was quite a busy year. In February we received a Challenge 
grant from the National Endowment for the Arts for our Information Services for the 
21st Century Initiative. This grant has already been partially matched with major sup- 
port from the John D. and Catherine T MacArthur Foundation, the Rockefeller 
Foundation, and the New York Community Trust, as well as contributions from mem- 
bers and friends. In September we moved to new offices on Hudson Street, where we 
have doubled our space. In December we republished three of our most popular books, 
and we have begun the research on a fourth: A Guide to Independent Film and Video 
Exhibitors in the U.S. 

We've also seen the tremendous growth of AIVF salons across the country, and in the 
coming year we hope to create opportunities for them to work together. Regional issues 
of the magazine continue to provide lively coverage of the dynamic independent work 
going on throughout the entire country. And we plan to have a Web site in place early 
this year. 

As proud as we feel of these accomplishments, we're also mindful of the fact that our 
field has experienced a number of devastating blows recently, and it is probable that 
there will be difficult times ahead. While it is gratifying to see the emergence of some 
new opportunities for independents, AIVF strongly believes that we must keep making 
the case for a public sector commitment to culture. After a number of years of reactive 
advocacy, we're now working proactively with many of our colleagues in the media and 
arts community to evolve a compelling vision of a positive "media future" and hopeful- 
ly to become more effective in achieving greater impact in both our public and private 
sector advocacy efforts. 

We're preparing for the challenges ahead. And one fact has become increasingly 
clear: While AIVF can act as a catalyst and facilitator, if any effort is to succeed, your 
personal involvement at a local level will be critical. Whether it's electing "arts friend- 
ly" representatives to public office, or ensuring that your state telecommunications pol- 
icy includes provisions for public interest and cultural concerns, or encouraging the 
entertainment industry to create broadly based programs of support for independents, it 
will only happen through the effort and commitment of numbers of concerned individ- 
uals working collaboratively. 

So, take a deep breath, get lots of rest, don't forget your vitamins — we need you to 
stay healthy for the work ahead. 

Ruby Lerner 

publisher, The Independent Film & Video Monthly 

executive director, Association of Independent Video & Filmmakers and the 

Foundation for Independent Video and Film 



IT'S TIME TO MOBILIZE 

In the last few years, the arts community has 
been vilified by far right and conservative politi- 
cians who are eager to lay waste to public sup- 
port for the arts and humanities. These vituper- 
ative attacks have mischaracterized and miscon- 
strued the importance of arts and culture to our 
society both spiritually and financially. The fol- 
lowing facts show just how important the arts are 
to the economy and the voting public. Next time 
a politician wants your vote, ask about his/her 
position on the government's role in supporting 
culture. It's time to mobilize. Use the facts: 

• On a national level, nonprofit arts organiza- 
tions generate an estimated $37 billion in eco- 
nomic activity and return $3.4 billion in federal 
income taxes to the U.S. Treasury each year. 

.• The arts create jobs, increase the local tax 
base, boost tourism, spur growth in related busi- 
nesses (hotels, restaurants, printing, etc.), and 
improve the overall quality of life for our cities 
and towns. 

• For every dollar the National Endowment for 
the Arts invests in communities, there is a 20- 
fold return in jobs, services and contracts. 

• Last year, $123 million in NEA grants lever- 
aged more than $1.3 billion in private and pub- 
lic matching funds. These public-private part- 
nerships stimulate a significant return on a 
small investment, thus emphasizing the impor- 
tance of federal funding to help nonprofit arts 
organizations generate revenue. 

• One Endowment dollar attract $ 1 1 and more 
for the arts from state, regional, and local arts 
agencies, foundations, corporations, businesses, 
and individuals. 

• More than 1.3 million Americans are 
employed in the not-for-profit arts industry. 

• The National Endowment for the Arts costs 
each American only $ .64 per year (based on 
last year's budget level). 

• A recent poll indicated that a full 60 percent 
of the American people believe that "the feder- 
al government should provide financial assis- 
tance to arts organizations, such as. art muse- 
ums, dance, opera, theater groups, and sympho- 
ny orchestras." 56 percent say they "would be 
willing to pay $15 more in their own taxes per 
year to support federal government efforts in 
the arts." 

• Private donations (which vary from year to 
year) or increased ticket prices (which would 
affect arts institutions' mission to reach a 
broader audience) will not be able to replace a 
loss of federal funding. 



4 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



What if 



□ Valuable film or tape was 
lost due to theft, fire or 
faulty processing? 

□ Your technical equipment 
broke down in the middle 
of filming? 

□ There's an injury or property 
damage on site? 

□ You're sued for film content, 
unauthorized use, or failure 
to obtain clearance? 

□ What if you're not insured? 





INSURANCE BROKERS 



ENTERTAINMENT/MEDIA INSURANCE SPECIALISTS 

Providing short and long-term coverage when you need it to reshoot, repair, and 

protect your products and time. 

CALL FOR A FREE QUOTE TODAY! 

1-800-638-8791 

7411 Old Branch Avenue, P.O. Box 128, Clinton, MD 20735 



January/February 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 5 



fUti/ 








FINALLY, 

FILM EDITING PRODUCTS 
THAT DO EVERYTHING 
YOU'D EXPECT. 
AT PRICES YOU DON'T EXPECT. 

D-Vision® Pro, the intuitive, easy to use non-linear editor, 
with thousands of users worldwide is known for 
full-featured editing and affordable pricing. Pro includes: 
Flex and Evertz edge code reading, negative cut list out- 
put, up to 100 hours of storage, perfect audio sync of 6 
independent audio channels... And is upgradeable to 
D- Vision's revolutionary new D-Vision FilmCUT™. Buy 
Pro now to ease your way into digital non-linear editing 
and take advantage of aggressive upgrade pricing toward 
the new D-Vision software products. 



K 



VISION 



D-Vision Systems, Inc. 

Making Digital Media Work For You. 

Coll for details. 

1-800-8DVISION (838-4746) 

Or Outside the U.S.:+1-31 2-71 4-1 400 

Or fax +1-31 2-71 4-1 400 

For the Professional Partner Nearest You. 



©1995 D-Vision Systems, Inc. D-Vision is a registered trademark and D-Vision OnLINE 
and Making Digital Media Work for You are trademarks of D- Vision Systems, Inc. 



Edited by Sue Young Wilson 



NEAoniheEdge 

Discipline Programs Dismantled 




The devastating Congressional budget 

CUT proposed for the National Endowment of 
the Arts (NEA) is nearly a fait accompli. On 
September 19, in their zeal to restructure, if 
not eliminate, this country's federal arts and 
humanities programs, a House -Senate con- 
ference committee agreed to reduce the 
NEAs already ravaged budget by another 40 
percent, granting the beleaguered agency a 
mere $99.5 million for fiscal year 1996. The 
NEA operating budget for 1995 was $163 
million. In contrast, the NEA received $176 
million in 1992. The cut will be official once 
the Senate and House vote on the final 
Interior Appropriations Bill. Because funding 
was approved for one year only, the agency 
will be forced to undergo another budget 
appropriation review in 1996 to determine its 
FY 1997 budget. A provision calling for the 
abolishment of the NEA within two years was 
rejected. 

Budget cuts and internal restructuring will 
radically alter the 30-year-old agency. As of 
1996, most individual artists fellowships will 
have been abolished; discipline-based depart- 
ments eliminated and replaced by "theme 
concentrations"; and content restrictions 
expanded. 

Not content with fettering the agency 
financially, the committee adopted the 
restrictive language contained in the Senate 
version of the Interior Appropriations Bill, 
which includes funding for the NEA. The 
amendment, submitted by Senator Jesse 
Helms (R-NC), denies funds for works of art 
that "denigrate the religious objects or reli- 
gious beliefs or the adherent of a particular 
belief" or "depicts or describes in a patently 
offensive way, sexual or excretory activities or 
organs." 

Responding to the committee's inclusion 
of the Helms amendment, NEA chairwoman 
Jane Alexander stated, "We believe that 
stringent restrictions on content are anathe- 
ma to artists and the creative process and 



NATIONAL 
ENDOWMENT 



FOR^jj^THE 




ARTS 



ultimately may cost the American taxpayers 
more money, as they surely will be challenged in 
the courts." First Amendment lawsuits aside, 
the effect of the Helms language will be to fur- 
ther jeopardize funding for work that is politi- 
cally, morally, or aesthetically controversial. 

Significantly, the committee also discontin- 
ued grants to individual artists except in the 
areas of literature and playwriting, the Jazz 
Masters Awards, and the National Heritage 
Fellows. This means that mediamakers will no 
longer be able to apply as individuals for pro- 
duction funding. 

Anticipating the massive budget cut, offi- 
cials at the NEA instituted plans for a wide- 
ranging reorganization of the agency, including 
the elimination of 89 staff positions. As of 
December 19, the agency was left with a total 
of 148 positions, just over half the number it 



had in October of 1994- 

This enormous staff reduction was accompa- 
nied by the creation of new grantmaking cate- 
gories and the termination of separate disci- 
pline programs. Instead of individual programs 
for media, visual arts, dance etc., projects from 
various disciplines will be competing with one 
another. Project support will now be provided 
through four theme concentrations: Heritage 
and Preservation, Creation and Presentation, 
Education and Access, and Planning and 
Stabilization for arts institutions. Organizations 
may submit only one application per year to 
one of the four categories. 

At this time, the NEA is unclear as to how 
project requests will he interpreted and lit ted 
into the four theme areas. Likewise, the agency 
has yet to determine whether an organization's 
sole grant application may contain several dis- 



January/February 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 7 



National 4 
Educational \ 

EDlA 



Network 



formerly National 
Educational Film 
& Video Festival 

May 15-19, 
1996 

Oakland, CA 

MARKET 

- Distributors are 
looking for docu- 
mentaries, health 
films, special 
interest videos, 
social issues titles 

- what you have 
to offer! 

CONFERENCE 

- 4 day intensive 
covering industry 
trends, fundrais- 
ing, distribution 

& marketing 
strategies. 

With ample 
opportunity to 
meet, mix and 
mingle with your 
peers, heroes 
and potential 
distributors. 



For more information, contact: 

IMEMN 655 13th Street, 
Oakland.CA 9461 2-1 220 
PH 510.465.6885 
FX 51 0.465.2835 
E-mail nemn@aol.com 



tinct projects, or whether one project may have 
multiple components. In other words, how or 
even if individuals' proposals will be accepted 
by arts organizations for possible submission to 
the NEA is unknown. What is clear is that the 
NEA's new configuration will substantially 
reduce the number of grant applications. 

The agency has also instituted major 
changes in the panel review process. Previously, 
applications were reviewed by peer panels — 
thus, media projects were evaluated by media 
professionals, dance 
projects by dance 
experts, and so on. 
Now there will be a 
two-tier panel review 
process. Each appli- 
cation will be received 
first by the appropri- 
ate discipline special- 
ist on staff, who will 
then critique and 
evaluate project re- 
quests with a panel of 
experts in that field. 
Those applications 

judged to be outstanding will be submitted to a 
second panel that will include experts from 
other arts disciplines for final judgment and 
grant approval. 

According to the NEA's press office, the idea 
behind the second-tier review panel is to foster 
a cross-disciplinary approach among artists and 
art organizations, allowing for a wider perspec- 
tive on the review panel and encouraging 
artists to work together. But it seems likely to 
penalize smaller, lesser-known organizations 
which will have to compete with widely recog- 
nized institutions. For example, a low-budget 
collective like Paper Tiger TV in New York 
might well have a difficult time vying for sup- 
port against a weighty, high profile entity like 
Boston's WGBH. 

The NEA's shrinking monies and reorganiza- 
tion may well be calamitous for independent 
film- and videomakers. These changes come on 
the heels of the elimination in 1994 of the 
NEA's regional regrant programs, which fun- 
neled funds to individual mediamakers through 
such institutions as the American Film 
Institute and Appalshop. With the cessation of 
direct grants to individuals working in media 
arts; and the fact that very few state arts coun- 
cils fund media, mediamakers are left with 
severely limited sources of federal and state 
funding. Moreover, those regional arts councils 
that do fund media, such as the New York State 



By this year, 

most individual artists 

fellowships will have been 

abolished, 

discipline-based 

departments eliminated, 

and content restricted. 



Council of the Arts (NYSCA), will be forced 
to operate with fewer dollars because of the 
reduction in grant monies from the NEA. 

A spokesperson for NYSCA stated that 
the reduction in funds from the NEA would 
most certainly have a "detrimental impact" 
on the agency, and on other state arts groups 
as well. NYSCA uses NEA grant money for 
operating expenses and staffing. Over the 
last five years, NYSCA has gone from 110 
staff members to approximately 55, and will 
probably have to 
cut jobs again this 
year. The difficulty 
of maintaining pro- 
grams and distrib- 
uting grants will be 
an even greater 
challenge for the 
organization in the 
upcoming years. 

The NEA will 
issue a new guide- 
line booklet early 
this year describing 
the four theme cat- 
egories and outlining eligibility requirements 

and review criteria. 

Cleo Cacoulidis 

Cleo Cacoulidis is advocacy coordinator for the 
Association of Independent Video and Filmmakers. 



FCC TO GET THE AX? 

While the Federal Communications Com- 
mission might not spring foremost to mind 
on a list of friends of independent media- 
makers, the FCC does enforce federal 
requirements, like that for public access TV, 
that to some extent protect public interests 
in the radio, broadcast television, and cable 
industries. But now an outspoken group of 
Republican Congress members, apparently 
not content with the agency's largely pro- 
industry rulings during the past year, are call- 
ing for the FCC's elimination and the priva- 
tization of all communications spectrum. 

At the head of the assault is Speaker of 
the House Newt Gingrich (R-GA). 
According to reports in the Washington Post 
and elsewhere, in the early days of the 104th 
Congress Gingrich held a private dinner with 
CEOs of the nation's major media and 
telecommunications companies. He told the 
gathering he planned to preempt state regu- 
lation, transfer control of the AT&T con- 



8 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



sent decree from the courts and the 
Department of Justice to the FCC, and then 
eliminate or downsize the latter. 

The Progress and Freedom Foundation, a 
Washington DC-based conservative thinktank 
closely allied with Gingrich, has issued a com- 
prehensive report on how and why the FCC 
should get the ax. The report accuses the FCC 
of delaying the entry of new technologies and 
stifling competition in communications mar- 
kets. It proposes that the agency be replaced 
with a vastly smaller "Office of Commun- 
ications Policy" to be overseen by the President. 

The report proposes a three -step process 
that would first eliminate almost every FCC 
regulation governing broadcasting, cable, and 
telephone markets. (The report does not, how- 
ever, call for the repeal of laws and regulations 
on indecent speech over telephones and mass 
media, although Gingrich was in fact outspo- 
ken against such provisions being included in 
the Senate and House telecom bills.) Next 
would go the FCC's role as "traffic cop" of the 
airwaves, giving incumbent broadcasters sole 
ownership of spectrum they are now using. All 
unused spectrum space could be claimed by the 
private sector, and if more than one party laid 
claim to the same spectrum, it would be auc- 
tioned off. Proceeds would go towards reduc- 
tion of the federal deficit, and not, as suggested 
in some alternate proposals before Congress, to 
a fund for educational technologies or public 
broadcasting. 

Meanwhile, House Subcommittee Chairman 
Jack Fields (R-TX) has also called for substan- 
tial reductions in the FCC's duties, promising 
to undertake a large-scale review of the FCC to 
make it "a more user-friendly entity" by elimi- 
nating all "unnecessary" spending and activi- 
ties. One of the FCC offices Fields proposes 
eliminating is its antitrust enforcement divi- 
sion, which he asserts duplicates the functions 
of that office in the Department of Justice. 
Another is the FCC's equal opportunity 
employment enforcement division, which Field 
claims is made redundant by the Equal 
Employment Opportunity Commission. Sen- 
ator Conrad Burns (R-MT) previously tried but 
failed to defund the FCC's EEO enforcement 
office. Fields will have the opportunity to 
attempt a similar maneuver when the House 
considers the FCC's authorization legislation 
sometime this year. 

Few defenders of the FCC have so far come 
forward: Industry generally favors deregulation, 
while public interest groups have claimed that 
the FCC has already all but abandoned its man- 







m 


a. 


tJ s 






[ * 


* J 



THE NRME UNO FUTURE 
OF CRMERR STRBILIZRTION. 



Introducing the 
CLIDECRM INDUSTRIES 

Camera Stabilization 
Product Line. 




The Evolution of Camera Stabilization has just taken "One Giant Leap" 
forward. The CLIDECRM DURL-C the first Dual Gimbaled. Dual 
Handled, counterbalanced Camera Stabilization System designed to 
distribute the weight of the System between Two. Operators. 



The Glidecam Dual-G 

stabilizes any camera 
or camcorder weighing 
from 8 to 22 pounds 
With the weight of the 
system divided between 
two operators, each 
person ends up carrying 
only half the weight. The 
Glidecam Dual-G easily 
replaces conventional 
dollies and tracks and 
frees the camera in a way 
previously only accom- 
plished with systems 
costing ten times as 
much With the Dual-G 
you'll free your mind as 
well as your camera 




- -i 



[/ 



We also offer the GLIDECAM 
1000 PRO hand-held stabilizer for 
cameras up to 6 pounds , and the 
CAMCRANE 100 boom arm camera 
crane for cameras up to 20 pounds 
All of our Stabilizers use Precision 
Free-floating Gimbals Our Stabili- 
zation systems work so gracefully 
and professionally, you'll soon see 
why the idea of making a camera 
Glide through the air isn't 
just a dream, its a reality 



The Glidecam 3000 Pro 
is the first Camera 
Stabilizer designed to 
distribute the weight of 
the system over your 
entire forearm and to 
eliminate torque from 
your wrist This is ac- 
complished using our 
exclusive and unique 
Forearm Support Brace 
Shooting smooth, shake- 
free images with cameras 
weighing from 4 to 10 



pounds occurs naturally, 
for the Glidecam 3000 
Pro is now truly an exten- 
sion of the human body 




Glidecam is Registered at the 
PATENT and TM Office 



Available Through Major Dealers or call CLIDECRM INDUSTRIES \ 
1-800-949-2089 or 1-508-866-2199 or FAX 1-508-866-5133 



Camcorder, monitor and Battery not included Copyright 1995 Glidecam industries All Rights Reserved 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 9 



date, laid out in the Communications Act of 
1934, to act in the "public interest, conve- 
nience and necessity." 

Ironically, both the House and the Senate 
have passed omnibus telecommunications leg- 
islation that would give the FCC over 80 new 
statutory tasks, most of them designed to 
ensure competition among the markets the 
FCC oversees. Some telecom experts speculate 
that the Republican "abolish the FCC cam- 
paign" is intended more to bring attention to 
the perceived need for further deregulation 
than actually to destroy the agency. Explains 
Jeffrey Chester of the Center for Media 
Education, "Even the Republicans realize they 

need the FCC." 

Gigi B. Sohn 

Gigz Sohn is deputy director of Media Access Project in 

Washington, D.C. 

R.I.R The 90s Channel 

The stroke of midnight on November 1, 1995 
saw the death of more than the Druidic calen- 
dar year. At that instant The 90's Channel, the 
widely known liberal public affairs cable chan- 
nel that has been fighting for its life for years, 
finally gave up the ghost in the face of a mas- 
sive rate hike by the cable company from which 
it leases its carriage. 

The cable operator, Denver-based Tele- 
Communications Inc. (TCI), asked The 90's 
Channel to start coughing up $250,000 per 
month for access after its previous contract 
expired in October 1995. "It was just not possi- 
ble for the channel to pay that much," says 
Dani Newsum, communications director of the 
Boulder-based 90's Channel. Neither party will 
say what the channel used to pay under the old 
contract, but Newsum mentions that the chan- 
nel made a counteroffer, which TCI turned 
down, of $7,000 per month. 

TCI, the country's largest cable operator, 
first tried to drop The 90's Channel in 1992. 
After 90's Channel president John Schwartz 
took TCI to court, the two parties negotiated 
an agreement that TCI would continue to carry 
the programs on their seven full-time cable 
channels through the end of October ["The 
90's Channel's Challenge," July 1995]. 

LaRae Marsik, TCI's director of communica- 
tions, argues that the rate that The 90's 
Channel was asked to pay is "definitely compa- 
rable" to that paid by the other leasers of access 
from the cable company. "TCI made a good 
faith effort to negotiate a leased access agree- 
ment with The 90's Channel in accordance 




The 90's Channel gave up the ghost on November 1. 



with FCC rules, and on terms which other 
leased access programmers have accepted." She 
asserts that the issue is purely a monetary one 
and has nothing to do with content. 

The 90's Channel filed petitions with the 
Federal Communications 
Commission to try to get an 
emergency stay of the rate 
increase and to challenge its 
legality. But the FCC has 
denied the first petition and 
made a preliminary state- 
ment that the new rates 
appear legal. 

Newsum says of the deci- 
sion, "When Congress added 
the requirement to the feder- 
al cable law that cable com- 
panies lease channels, the 
language it used was [about] 



the promotion of 'diversity.' But if in practice 
the government allows absolutely ruinous 
rates to be charged for that access, then what 

you have is 
empty legis- 
lation." 

She says 
The 90's 
Channel 
may appeal 
the matter 
further. 
Meanwhile, 
Schwartz 
plans to 
keep re- 
c r u i t i n g 
cable sta- 
tions to 
carry Free 
Speech TV, 
a compan- 
ion project 
similarly promoting progressive and indepen- 
dent programming, but carried on public 
rather than leased access cable channels. 

Sue Young Wilson 

Sue Young Wilson is managing editor of The 
Independent. 



Director Alleges Censorship 
in Post-Communist Poland 

Players, by Polish filmmaker Ryszard Bugajski, 
was scheduled to open in Warsaw last August 
and then enjoy a U.S. premiere in Chicago on 
September 16, the first night of the Seventh 
Annual Polish Film Festival at the Film 
Center of the School of the Art Institute. It 
did neither. In Poland, the opening of the 
film, which Bugajski describes as a "political 



10 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 




thriller and satire" about the 1990 Polish elec- 
tions, was delayed for two months, until 
October 13, and was also postponed in 
Chicago, missing the festival. 

The explanation the Film Center got from a 
festival cosponsor for the pulling of the movie 
was that the subtitles were not ready. But 
according to Bugajski — whose previous film 
The Interrogation was banned in Poland for 
seven years [see "Spring Takes Time: Films 
from East Germany and Poland," Oct. 1990] — 
the delay of Players stemmed from censorship. 

Players was financed by Polish state televi 
sion and the Ministry of Culture, which still 
fund almost all Polish feature films. Recently, 
Bugajski charges, one or both agencies, fearful 
of political risk, have held up the release of his 
and several other controversial films until cer 
tain scenes were cut. 

At a preview of Players, he says, representa 
tives from both agencies were present. "The 
television bosses said the film showed cynicism, 
corruption, and heavy drinking, so that no can 
didate looks good [and that] it depict [ed] per 
sonalities in such a bad light that it could pos 
sibly lead to litigation." Bugajski says he had to 
make a number of cuts — "shots of either docu- 
mentary or dramatic footage that they consid- 
ered derogatory to the characters — before the 
"bosses" would release the film. 

"The essential difference between the 
Communist era and today," the filmmaker adds, 
"is that it's no longer clear what values and 
principles are being defended by the Ministry of 
Culture. The Interrogation was called anti- 
socialist, which meant against the government. 
Now . . . [w] hat's demanded from you is not 
very clear. No one says, 'We are censoring for 
political reasons,' but, 'People may sue you — or 
sue us, the Ministry of Culture and state televi 
sion, as your backers.' 

"That's the way censorship works now in 
Poland, and I think it is 
very clever." 

Karen Rosenberg 

Karen Rosenberg is a jdm 

critic with a special interest in 

Eastern Europe. She has 

written recently for the Index 

on Censorship, In These 

Times, unci The Women's 

Review ot Books 



Imagine that: Players, a thriller by Ryszard Bugajski 
about the 1990 elections in Poland, was censored for 
depicting political candidates engaged in "cynicism, 
corruption, and heavy drinking." Courtesy filmmaker 





Betacam SP production packages 

Avid MCBDOD & MCIOOO on/off-line editing 

component Betacam SP on-line editing 

Micnotime Paint F/X DL graphics 

Macintosh graphics & compositing 

component HiB transfers 

Betacam SP, 3/4" SP, HiB S. VHS duplication 

25' x 30' stage 

212.529.8204 

D V 8 VIOEO / 738 B fl D fl W R V NYC 10003 



This is by far the best production course 
being offered anywhere. " 

Peter Pastorelli, Production Manager, "Batman Forever" 



Robert 
Bordiga's 




NUTS & BOLTS 




N. Y.: 



March 1-3 
June 7-9 
Oct. 18-20 
Chicago: May 10-12 



PRODUCTION SEMINAR! 

L.A.: March 8-10 
June 28-30 
Oct. 4-6 

Miami: Nov. 1-3 



a 



By the end of this course you feel like you 've 
just finished making a movie." 

Yudi Bennett, 1st AD, The Client," "Star Trek-Generations" 



Discount Airfares & Hotel R.ites Available 

1-800-755-PROD 



Ask About Group or Student R.ites 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 11 



You're in GOOD 

COMPANY 

when you DL/ kJ W~ \*J JT 

YOUR FILM a, 



fc 



35MM BLOW-UPS BY DUART: 

RELEASED THEATRICALLY FROM 1990-1995 



" AMAZONIA: 
VOICES FROM THE RAIN FOREST'' 

BY GLENN SWITKES 
AND ROSAINES "MONTI" AGUIRRE 

DISTRIBUTED BY TARA RELEASING 

* "...AND GOD SPOKE" 

BY ARTHUR BORMAN 

DISTRIBUTED BY LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 

'THE BROTHERS MCMULLEN" 

BY EDWARD BURNS 

DISTRIBUTOR: FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES 

* "COMBINATION PLATTER" 

BY TONY CHAN 

DISTRIBUTED BY ARROW RELEASING 

"CRUMB" 

BY TERRY ZWIGOFF 

DISTRIBUTOR: SONY PICTURES CLASSICS 



* "THE INCIDENT AT OGLALA" 

BY MICHAEL APTED 

DISTRIBUTED BY CAROLCO PICTURES 

"THE INCREDIBLY 

TRUE ADVENTURE OF TWO GIRLS 

IN LOVE" 

BY MARIA MAGGENTI 

DISTRIBUTOR: FINE LINE 

* "JUST ANOTHER GIRL 
ON THE IRT" 

BY LESLIE HARRIS 

DISTRIBUTED BY MIRAMAX 

* "MANHATTAN BY NUMBERS" 

BY AMIR NADIR 

DISTRIBUTED BY ARTISTIC LICENSE FILMS 

" MARTHA AND ETHEL" 

BY J YLL JOHNSTONE 

DISTRIBUTED BY SONY PICTURES CLASSICS 





DuArt Film and Video 


1 245 West 


i.iTH Street New York, NY 1(11)19 212 757 458(1 




or 1 Slid 52 DUART 



* "METROPOLITAN" 

BY WHIT STILLMAN 

DISTRIBUTED BY NEW LINE CINEMA 

"MOVING THE MOUNTAIN" 

BY MICHAEL APTED 

DISTRIBUTOR: OCTOBER FILMS 

* "MY UFE IS IN TURNAROUND" 

BY ERIC SCHAEFFER AND 
DONAL LARDNER WARD 

DISTRIBUTED BY ARROW ENTERTAINMENT 

"PARIS IS BURNING" 

BY JENNIE LIVINGSTON 

DISTRIBUTED BY MIRAMAX 

"POISON" 

BY TODD HAYNES 

DISTRIBUTED ZEITGEIST FILMS 

"THE RESTLESS CONSCIENCE" 

BY HAVA KOHAV BELLER 

DISTRIBUTED BY DIRECT CINEMA 

"ROAD SCHOLAR" 

BY ROGER WEISBERG 

DISTRIBUTED BY SAMUEL GOLDWYN 

"ROGER AND ME" 

BY MICHAEL MOORE 

DISTRIBUTED BY WARNER BROTHERS 

» "RUBY IN PARADISE" 

BY VICTOR NUNEZ 

DISTRIBUTED BY OCTOBER FILMS 

"SLACKER" 

BY RICHARD LINKLATER 

DISTRIBUTED BY ORION CLASSICS 

* "THANK YOU 
AND GOOD NIGHT" 

BYJANOXENBERG 

DISTRIBUTED BY ARIES FILMS 

* "TIME INDEFINITE" 

BY ROSS MCELWEE 

DISTRIBUTED BY FIRST RUN FEATURES 

* "VERMONT IS FOR LOVERS" 

BY JOHN O'BRIEN 

DISTRIBUTED BY ZEITGEIST FILMS 
■ BLOWN -UP FROM S16MM NEGATIVE 



12 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



T 

JEAN ROY 

CRITICS WEEK 
AT CANNES 

By Howard Feinstein 




After the dust settled at last year's 
Cannes Film Festival, word has it, the wrath 
of the umbrella organization fell on tiny 
Critics Week (Semaine de la Critique). Most 
Cannes attendees agreed that 1995 was a 
weak year tor the official Competition, Un 
Certain Regard, and even the Director's 
Fortnight. It seems that Critics Week 
received attention way out of proportion to 
its small size: seven features and seven shorts. 

"When you go to the most famous restau- 
rants, you don't have a wide choice," explains 
Jean Roy, director general of Critics Week for 
the past 12 years. "It you see a menu where 
there is steak, sauerkraut, and couscous, you 
can he sure it's a bad joint." There is charm in 
his heavy accent, short stature, and impish 
laugh, which is usually reserved for his own 
witty, probably well-rehearsed, metaphors. 

"Taking only seven films is an advantage. 
In the Competition, you have to put in 24 
films, just because you haw 24 slots. It's 
impossible to find 24 masterpieces after 
Berlin and Venice, which want 24 master- 



pieces, too. So each year you have in the 
Competition five great films, six films which are 
okay, and films which just fill a spot. We at 
Critics Week just want to show the best stuff." 
The French Film Critics Guild created 
Critics Week back in 1962 to provide a show- 
case for all of the new waves emerging around 
the world. "The tuxedoed audience wouldn't 
have supported these kinds of films," explains 
Roy (pronounced something like hwah), who 
has been a member of the selection 
committee for 17 years. Critics 
Week operates on a minuscule 1 
million franc ($210,000) budget, 
50 percent from the state, and 50 
percent from private sponsors, like 
Mercedes Benz. It receives office 
space and free projection in the 
Palais du Festivals from the festival 
itself, though Roy hastens to add 
that it is "absolutely independent." 
Feature entries must be a first or 
second effort and the director 
must be unknown. "We wouldn't 
take a second feature, for example, 
if the first won a Palme d'Or. That 
would be stupid." What he cannot 
describe is the kind of work he and 
the other six committee members 
might want to show. "Critics Week 
is more about a general opinion of 
what the French critics think is the present sit- 
uation of film," he says. 

' Roy has been the lead film reviewer for the 
Paris Communist Party daily LHumanite for 10 
years. ("You wouldn't call it 'official.' I don't 
receive instructions from the Central Party." 
He laughs again.) Roy is also vice president of 
the international organization of film critics, 
FIPRESCI, and general secretary of the French 
Film Critics Guild. 

Last year alone, Roy watched around 300 
features and 300 shorts in 35 countries. If he 
takes to something, he sends it back to Paris for 
a collective committee screening. In New York, 
Roy screened "something like 45 features and a 
lot of shorts." (Filmmakers must pay the projec- 
tion costs at Tribeca Film Center. "There is no 
help from the government. The U.S. is the only 
Country in the world where we have to 
charge.") "(U.S. liaison] Sandy Mandelberger's 
job is to let the entire community know I am 
coming and to handle prints. He doesn't filter 
them; he is doing a technical job. We don't 




want to take a chance that we'd miss some- 
thing, as these directors are all newcomers." 

From what he saw in the States, Roy and the 
committee chose two features in 1995. One 
pure American indie is Queens-based Hal 
Salwen's delightful telephone-comedy, Denise 
Calls Up (which has since been picked up by 
Sony Pictures Classics). For Roy, Denise recalls 
the screwball comedies of Leo McCarey, 
Gregory La Cava, Howard Hawks, and Preston 
Sturges, and he compares its ensemble charac- 
ters to the "schizophrenic New York intellectu- 
al petit bourgeoisie like in the films of Woody 
Allen." He does not lose sight of his audience. 
"When I start laughing when I'm alone in the 
theater, and I have already spent 12 hours 
watching films that day, then I know the reac- 
tion will be good at the festival." (The Camera 
d'Or jury awarded Denise Calls Up honorable 
mention [second prize] for best first film of the 
entire festival.) 

The other selection was the action thriller 
Mute Witness, an English-language German 
production by the German-educated British 
national Anthony Waller that was shot entirely 
in Russia. (It was submitted by Sony Classics.) 
Rounding out 1995's slate were NYU graduate 
Steve Wang's impressive Daughter- in-Law 
(Taiwan); Stephen Williams' Soul Survivor 
(Canada); Chris Newby's Madagascar Skin 
(UK); Fernando Merinero's The Children o) the 
Wind (Spain); and Frank Van Passel's 
Manneken Pis (Belgium). U.S. shorts included 
Richard Sears's An Evil Toum and Robert 
I larders's The Last Laugh. 1 hree prizes were 
awarded, but losers should not he disheartened. 

"Everyone receives a diploma." 

Roy is optimistic about the state of I I.S. indie 
filmmaking. "I think it's very vivid and lively. 
There are so many people making films that 
some have to be good. Von have to struggle to 
survive, but you are very lucks to be .American, 
to speak English. You are the wolf. It you are the 
sheep, you have to have protection to survive." 

Among the wolves and sheep that Critic 
Week has introduced over the past 34 years are 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 13 



fost& 
Luscious 



500, 750 and 1000 watts 
without the weight or 
hassle. Lowel Rifa-lites. 
The skinny travel 
companions that turn 
into bright, sensually soft 
sources in seconds. 









lil 



Lowel-Light Manufacturing, Inc. 

140 58th Street Brooklyn, New York 11220 
71 8 921 -0600 Fax: 71 8 921 -0303 



Chris Marker, Ousmane Sembene, Jean-Marie 
Straub and Daniele Huillet, Barbet Schroeder, 
Alain Tanner, Ken Loach, Bernardo Bertolucci, 
Paul Morrissey, Denys Arcand, Bill Gunn, 
Haile Gerima, Robert Young, Derek Jarman, 
Agnieszka Holland, Ulrike Ottinger, John 
Sayles, Bill Duke, Amos Gitai, Wong Kar-wai, 
and Kevin Smith. 

No wonder the big guys are tres jaloux. 

U.S. deadline: March 15. Contact: Sandy 
Mandelberger, International Media Resources: 
(212) 941-1464; fax: 431-0329. Contact in 
France: tel: (33) (1) 45 75 68 27; fax: (33) (1) 
40 59 03 99. 

Howard Feinstein is a New York-based film critic who 
writes regularly for the Guardian (U.K.) and Out. 



JANE BALFOUR 

fijm&igpn sales 
agerxt 

By Michele Shapiro 



Strike up a conversation about foreign 
sales agents with just about anyone in the busi- 
ness, and inevitably Jane Balfour's name will 
come up. The British native started the 
London-based Jane Balfour Films in 1983. 
Since then, Balfour has become the Michael 
Ovitz of the nonfiction film world, navigating 
overseas markets for scores of documentarians 
and, more recently, a handful of feature film- 
makers. 

Prior to her foray into foreign sales, Balfour 
worked as a hospitality officer for the London 
and Edinburgh film festivals. In the early eight- 
ies she was persuaded by friends to start her 
own business. They weren't just any friends, 
however. They were the husband and wife film- 
making team of Chris Hegedus and D. A. 
Pennebaker (The War Room). "I loved her per- 
ception of independents and her honesty and 
integrity," says Hegedus. "She is a passionate 
believer in our type of filmmaking, which is 
rare." 

Hegedus and Pennebaker struck up a friend- 
ship with Balfour at the Edinburgh festival in 
the late seventies. Balfour peddled some of the 
couple's films to overseas markets while work- 
ing at Corey Films, a London-based interna- 
tional sales company. When Balfour left Corey 



to start her own business, the duo was first to 
sign on for representation. She took on their 
hour-long project Rockahy, which traces the 
production of a Samuel Beckett play from 
rehearsal through opening night. Balfour 
scored a coup when the BBC purchased the 
documentary, but she had no idea at the time 
how all-consuming her job would soon 
become. 

"I worked out of my back bedroom and 
traveled 105 days out of the year," she recalls 
over breakfast at the posh Steinberger Hotel 
during the 1995 Berlin International Film 
Festival, where Balfour Films was represent- 
ing 10 works, including Tony Buba's blue- 
collar drama No Pets and Dina Marie 
Chapman's tongue-in-cheek documentary 
Rhinoskin: The Making of a Movie Star. 

Other films from the United States 
Balfour currently represents are Steven 




Courtesy Jane Balfour Films 



Martin's Theremin: An Electronic Odyssey, 
about the bizarre instrument and its maker; 
Alice Stone's She Lives to Ride, on women 
mo torcy lists; Mirra Bank's Nobody's Girls, on 
frontiers -women of the American West; Ross 
McElwee's meditation on marriage, death, 
and family, Time Indefinite; and Joe Berlinger 
and Bruce Sinofsky's Brother's Keeper, on the 
trial of a rural recluse for the murder of his 
brother. 

Buyer gatherings such as the European 
Film Market in Berlin and MIP-TV in 
Cannes are staples for Balfour, who uses 
them to strengthen her ties with buyers as 
well as filmmakers. She envisions each mar- 
ket as a link in a continuous chain. "If my 
films do well in Berlin, it creates a reputation 



14 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



for them when I go to MIR" she says. 
According to Balfour, there is no "market" per 
se for documentaries, because most larger sta- 
tions opt to produce their own shows. However, 
much of Balfour's success has come from her 
relationship with the BBC and Channel 4 in 
Great Britain — two tough nuts for any docu- 
mentary maker to crack. 

Pennebaker and Hegedus consider her the 
reason why The War Room got off the ground. 
"Only individual donors gave us money in the 
States," Hegedus recalls. "Jane arranged a deal 
with the BBC for which we were given some 
production money up front. . . [W]e relied 
upon European sales, and the film was sold to 
Australian television as well as German, 
French, and Finnish TV" 

Balfour is aware of the poor reputation for- 
eign sales reps have garnered within the film- 
making community, thanks to the multitude of 
disreputable swindlers who prey upon those 
unfamiliar with the foreign sales game. But the 
advantages of recruiting a reputable agent are 
significant. "You can sell a film yourself, but it's 
both time-consuming and expensive. Also, 
most buyers prefer to work with agents." 

Balfour receives 5 to 25 videotapes per week 
from filmmakers seeking representation. Out of 
those, she takes on between 50 and 100 per 
year. "I look for well-made films that tell inter- 
esting stories from unusual angles," she said. 
"High production values and themes that tran- 
scend national borders are also important." 

What's the current asking price for docu- 
mentaries? According to Balfour, rates vary 
considerably depending on a number of factors, 
such as the country size and the rights 
optioned. She estimates that half-hour docs 
usually fetch anywhere from just a few dollars 
to $60,000 maximum. "Smaller stations. ..only 
pay between $1,000 and $2,000," she says. On 
average, longer documentaries bring in 
between $14,000 and $200,000. She suggests 
using the TV World Price Guide as an indicator 
[available through TV World, 33/39 Bowling 
Green Lane, London EC1R OKA, England; (44 
171) 837-1212; fax: 837-8250]. 

Balfoui also handles independently pro- 
duced fiction features, which she considers the 
United States' strength now. Among the U.S. 
feature titles Balfour currently represents are 
Todd Haynes's Poison; Amir Nader's Manhattan 
by Numbers; Steve Okazaki's The Lisa Theory; 
and Julia Reichert's Emma and Elvis. "There 
was a dearth of good fiction films a few years 
ago, but not anymore," she observed. "But 
there are a lot more agents handing fiction films 
than documentaries." 



Full Production, Post-Production, and Creative Services 



-Directors, Writers, DPs, and Editors Available- 
Specializing in cost-saving options, best rates in NYC 



Production: 

•Cut-rate Hi8, BetaS/* packages 

•Professional Crews 

•Casting/Loc. scouting 

•Studios 




Post-Production: 
• Toaster 4000 A/B Roll 
•Hi8, 3/4"SP, BetaSP 
•CG, TBCs, the worki 
•Affordable 3D animation 



Video Production 

WE OFFER TRAINING! 

-Low project rates available-Call for consultation today- 



200 Broadway, Stc. 2B, NY, NY 10001 2 1 2-889- 1 60 l-fax-2 12-889- 1602 



Technicolor, 

NEW YORK 

SALUTES THE FUTURE OF OUR INDUSTRY 
THE INDEPENDENT FILMMAKER 

PRODUCTION 
PROCESSING 

for your 

FEATURES 'TELEVISION 

COMMERCIALS • DOCUMENTARIES 

ALL SOUND AND VIDEO NEEDS 

35MM*16MM 



321 WEST 44TH STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10036 
212-582-7310 • FAX 212-265-9089 



January/February 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 15 



Few, however, have namesakes in the States. 
Baby Jane, the daughter of Hegedus and 
Pennebaker, is now eight years old. When 
Hegedus was pregnant, Balfour stayed at her 
apartment during the Independent Feature 
Film Market. Hegedus recalls, "She helped out 
so much that I told her if I had a girl, I'd name 
it after her." Since then, Balfour's help has con- 
tinued in other important ways. "She goes off 
with our films as if they were gems and sells 
them. She has a fighting attitude with all [the 
projects she reps]," says Hegedus. "That's what 
has made her so successful." 

Jane Balfour Films, Ltd., Burghley House, 35 
Fortess Rd., London NW5 IAD, England; (44- 
171) 267-5392; fax: 267-4241. 

Michele Shapiro is film editor of Time Out New York. 



T 

KATHLEEN DORE 

Crervemctl ^t^Lcarxageir 

BRAVO/INDEPENDENT 
FILM CHANNEL 

By Minne J.M. Hong 



When Kathleen Dore and the other folks 
behind the Independent Film Channel looked 
at the growing success of independently pro- 
duced films, they knew they were on to some- 
thing big. "We thought it was critical to be first 
in the marketplace," says Dore, who was then 
executive vice president and general manager 
of Bravo, "and that something would happen for 
independent films on TV. If you're first, and you 
do it well, you define the medium." 

Under Dore's direction, the fledging 
Independent Film Channel (IFC), a 24-hour 
cable channel owned and operated by Bravo's 
parent company, Rainbow Programming 
Holdings, has attempted to do precisely that. 
Since its launch on September 1, 1994, the IFC 
has expanded to more than three million sub- 
scribers on cable and satellite systems nation- 
wide, and the demand is growing. Despite some 
initial setbacks in larger markets (IFC is not yet 
available in Manhattan due to Time Warner's 
lack of channel capacity), viewer requests for 



the channel have been surprisingly high, partic- 
ularly in mid- size cities in the Midwest. 

"The response has been extremely reward- 
ing, both from the film community and the pub- 
lic at large," says Dore. "It reconfirms our feel- 
ing that there was a market out there for this 
type of programming. The most common 
response from viewers is that 'There's nothing 
like this.'" Indeed, outlets like Bravo, the 
Sundance Film Channel, and the Vanguard 
Cinema showcase on Cinemax may be increas- 
ingly important as public television faces a 
more uncertain future. 

While its initial lineup drew largely from for- 
eign and classic titles, IFC has gradually intro- 
duced more American independent films. The 
fall '95 lineup, for example, includes the world 
television premiere of Nancy Savoca's sleeper 
Household Saints, actress Illeana Douglas's short 
Boy Crazy, Girl Crazier, and Adam Simon's The 
Typewriter, the Rifle, and the Camera, a feature- 
length documentary on director Sam Fuller 
that is an IFC coproduction. IFC is also adding 
an array of informational spots giving back- 
ground on the independent film scene, from 




background interviews with filmmakers to film 
festival coverage. At this year's Independent 
Feature Film Market (IFFM), for instance, IFC 



lent camcorders to indie filmmakers Doug 
Block, Matthew Harrison, Tony Chan, Leslie 
Harris, Michael Almereyda, and Amy Hobby, 
for each to shoot footage for a two-to-three 
minute short film highlighting their percep- 
tions of the market experience. 

Along the same lines, the channel plans to 
branch its schedule into "programming 
strands" to provide a balance of shorts, for- 
eign films, star vehicles, documentaries, clas- 
sics, cult classics, and works by emerging 
artists. "We're going to show classics and for- 
eign films inasmuch as they have helped 
defined the genre," explains Dore, "but the 
majority will be American independents, 
which is the core of our programming." 

Following the general rule of thumb for 
defining independent film, the IFC mission's 
statement says the channel aims to present 
films "made outside the Hollywood studio 
system." But what exactly does that mean? 
Dore explains, "I don't know if there is a 
complete definition of independent films, but 
we look for films that express a different sort 
of artistry, outside a studio demand for a for- 
mulaic plot. In some instances 
they may raise a social con- 
sciousness and express an indi- 
vidual vision." 

In an effort to scout out new 
visions, IFC has launched 
extensive campaigns inside the 
two most heavily traveled 
routes for emerging filmmak- 
ers: film schools and festivals. 
The channel has tapped New 
York University's Tisch School 
of the Arts as the flagship 
school of its University 
Advisory Board, which also 
includes the University of 
Southern California, the 
School of Visual Arts, Boston 
University, and Columbia Uni- 
versity. IFC also has a presence 
in covering or sponsoring sev- 
eral major film festivals, 
including the IFP Gotham 
Awards at IFFM, the New York 
Film Festival, the Virginia Film 
Festival, and the Los Angeles 
Independent Film Festival. 
"We see a lot of material 
through the festivals," says 
Dore. "We're looking for talent and filmmak- 
ers who are interested in doing projects for 
us" 



16 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



"In making Picture Bride, 
we turned many times to 
AIVF/FIVF publications for 
the facts on fundraising, 
production and distribution. 
Their books are up-to-date, 
well organized and accessible. 
Best of all, it's getting the 41 1 
without the schmooze!" 
Kayo Hatta — 
"Picture Bride", winner of 
The Audience Award, 
Sundance Film Festival, 1995 

"The new AIVF/FIVF books 
are a great one-stop course in 
independent film distribution. 
Keep your film's release story 
from being one of hex, lies & 
videotape — or living in 
oblivion." 

Whit Stillman — "Barcelona" 
& "Metropolitan" 



CRLL NOW 

[212] 807-1400 

Orwrite:AIVF/FIVF 

304 HUDSON STREET, 6th Fl, 

NEW YORK, NY 10013 

Shipping and handling: 

Domestic - $3.50 for the 

first book, $ 1 .00 for each 

additional book. 

Foreign - $5.00 for the first 

book, $1.50 for each 

additional book. 

VISA and Mastercard 

Accepted 



OF 3 GREAT RESOURCE 
BOOKS FROM AIVF/FIVF 

ORDER TODAY - SUPPLIES ARE LIMITED ! 



AIVF/FIVF GUIDE TO INTERNATIONAL FILM & VIDEO FESTIVALS 

edited by Kathryn Bowser 

$34.95/$29.95 AIVF members. Plus shipping and handling. 

The 4th edition of FIVF's best seller is a completely indexed and easy-to-read 

compendium of over 400 international film and video festivals, with contact 

information, entry regulations, dates and deadlines, categories, accepted formats, 

and much more.The festival guide includes information on all types of festivals: 

small and large, specialized and general, domestic and foreign. 



AIVF/FIVF GUIDE TO FILM & VIDEO DISTRIBUTORS 

edited by Kathryn Bowser 

$24.95/$ 1 9.95 AIVF members. Plus shipping and handling. 

A must-read for independent film and video makers searching for the right 

distributor.The distributors' guide presents handy profiles of 1 50 commercial and 

nonprofit distributors, practical information and company statistics on the type of 

work handled, primary markets, relations with producers, marketing and 

promotion, foreign distribution and contacts. Fully indexed. This is the best 

compendium of distribution information especially tailored for independent 

producers available. 

THE NEXT STEP: DISTRIBUTING INDEPENDENT FILMS AND VIDEOS 

edited by Morrie Warshawski 

$24.95/$ 1 9.95 AIVF members. Plus shipping and handling. 
Leading professionals in the field answer frequently asked questions on 
distribution. Learn more about finding a distributor from Debra Zimmerman 
(Women Make Movies), self-distribution from Joe Berlinger (producer/director 
of Brother's Keeper), foreign distribution from Nancy Walzog (Tapestry 
International) and theatrical distribution from David Rosen (author of Off 
Hollywood). Plus find out about promotion; public broadcasting, cable and home 
video markets; non-theatrical distribution; contracts and much, much more. 
A bibliography provides additional readings on selected topics. This is a prime 
source of practical insights into the whole distribution process. 



SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL 

SAVE OVER 25%— ORDER ALL THREE BOOKS AND PAY ONLY $59.95 Plus shipping and handling. 
Join now as an AIVF member at the DISCOUNTED rate of $40.00 for I year! 

Both of these SPECIALS expire April 30, 1996 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 17 



Significantly, the channel has set up three 
programs to support new filmmakers: IFCheap 
(Independent Film Channel Helps Emerging 
Artists Produce) , a fund from IFC profits to be 
disbursed by the Advisory Board; IFC 
Outstanding Student Award, a $10,000 cash 
award for a student filmmaker to produce his or 
her next film; and Short Shorts, targeting 
emerging filmmakers to produce shorts to be 
aired on IFC. 

"We plan to produce eight to twelve original 
feature films and shorts a year," estimates Dore. 
"Our role may be differently structured, from 
providing finishing funds to coproduction." 
The channel's first original feature production, 
The Typewriter, the Rifle, and the Camera, is a 
coproduction between IFC and the British Film 
Institute. 

Dore conveys the essence of the channel's 
objective through a personal anecdote about 
the kind of impact programming can carry. She 
recalls, "I grew up in Iowa in a university town. 
When I was in junior high, I went to an audito- 
rium on campus. They were showing films out- 
side of Hollywood — Truffaut and things like 
that — and it opened up a whole new way of 
looking at film. Basically, the work stood on its 
own and got to me on a very emotional level. 
And being moved by the story is what, at the 
end of the day, matters." 

The Independent Film Channel, 150 
Crossways Park West, Woodbury, NY 11797; 
(516) 364-2222. 

Minne ].M. Hong is a New York-based freelance writer 

who writes on media for the Asian New Yorker, the 

Island Ear, and CineVue. 



CARL GOODMAN 

cunratcnr of digital media 



MUSEUM. 
MOSSMtsfG IAAjXGE 



By Sue Young Wilson 

Carl Goodman may be the only museum 
curator in the world to get envious phone calls 
from computer-game enthusiasts informing him 
that he has the best job in the world. And well 
they may say so. The shelves of Goodman's 




office at the American Museum of the Moving 
Image (AMMI) are crammed with the latest 
games on CD-ROM (no, he doesn't lend them 
out), and, as the first-ever full-time museum 
curator for digital media, he gets to play with 
(learn about, demonstrate) some of the neatest 
high-tech toys around. 

Which isn't to say it isn't a job. "Basically, 
what I do has two layers. The first is to study 
and keep track of how computers are used to 
store images: in traditional film- and videomak- 
ing, and in new sorts of experiences where the 
computer mediates between the user and the 
information, as with CD-ROMs or QuickTime. 
The second is to employ those technologies — 
within and without the walls of AMMI — to 
make an interactive computer program or Web 
site," Goodman says seemingly in one breath 
(appropriately, he tends to talk at cyberspeed) . 

Goodman is considerably less gee -whiz about 
the latest hardware for its own sake than many 
riders of the multimedia bandwagon. There's 
also the matter of ideas. In pursuit of thought- 
ful, considered discussion of new media and its 
implications, Goodman developed the muse- 
um's popular MIEDIA ("Moving Images Enter 
the Digital Interactive Age") seminar series, 



which has been run- 
ning since the fall of 
1993. The seminars 
look at the role of 
digital technology in 
film and video pro- 
duction and showcas- 
es new technolo- 
gies—CD-ROMs, 
virtual reality, on-line 
services, computer 
animation. A recent 
seminar featured 
powerhouse speakers 
from three moving 
image thinktanks: 
Glorianna Davenport 
of the Massachusetts 
Institute of Tech- 
nology's Media Lab, 
Michael Naimark of 
Interval Research, 
and Ken Perlin of the 
Media Research Lab 
at New York Uni- 
versity's Center for 
Digital Multimedia. 
MIEDIA mavens 
have also been treat- 
ed to demos of 3DO 
gaming technology, 
independent CD-ROM production, digital 
Disney, and Hollywood's efforts to blend cin- 
ema and interactive technology. 

Goodman, 29, has been at AMMI since 
shortly after its founding in 1988 and his own 
graduation from Wesleyan University, where 
he majored in philosophy and also studied 
music, having been brought up in a family of 
musicians in Philadelphia. He was "not a 
geek in college," he says, although he did 
own an early electronic sampling device, an 
8-bit model that impressed his friends with its 
novelty ("They thought I was Merlin") . After 
college he spent a brief stint as a Wall Street 
headhunter and a composer of film, theater, 
and dance scores and jingles for TV commer- 
cials. 

Then, in the fall of 1988, Goodman heard 
from AMMI founder and director Rochelle 
Slovin — whose children he had known in 
college — that the new museum planned to 
devote a small part of its exhibit to sound 
editing. A Fairlight digital/audio workstation 
was purchased, and Goodman was hired part- 
time to play with it until he had mastered its 
use and could demonstrate it to visitors. 
Goodman eventually found himself the 



18 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



museum's resident digital media expert, and — 
with detours into museum public relations and 
the education department — his job evolved 
into the present one. 

He's just finished putting together a dozen 
or so computer-based interactive displays in 
the museum's core exhibit, "Behind the 
Screen," which was recently expanded and 
updated at a cost of $3 million and opens in 
February. There are hands-on workstations 
where visitors can do their own automatic dia- 
logue replacement or learn the working prin- 
ciples of animation by making a video flipbook 
with images of themselves. Goodman has set 
up other digital displays, like one of the 
Lightworks nonlinear editing system, to be 
demonstrated by a museum staffer, choosing 
to present the processes in their full complex- 
ity rather than simplify them — and sacrifice 
versimilitude — to the point where an 
untrained visitor could hope to attempt them. 
In this as in other aspects of his work, 
Goodman seems quite clear about his mission: 
"It's important, because they're not yet ubiq- 
uitous, as TV and film are, that people just see 
digital media and processes," he declares. "I 
try to educate them in an anxiety-free, neutral 
environment." 

He's also curated such exhibits as one on 
the history of the video game — hence the 
temptingly laden office shelves — and another 
on cutting-edge home entertainment and 
software. He's become something of a digital 
pundit, writing a monthly column entitled 
"Scanner" for a Web site called Total New 
York (http://www.totalny.com). He consults 
about the use of the technology. And he fields 
a constant stream of phone calls from individ- 
uals wanting to talk cyberpunk or asking him 
to recommend a multimedia pro. (AMMI "is a 
bit of a hub," he says, "where people call you 
up and say, 'I need an animator. I need a so- 
and-so.' My headhunting experience has 
come in handy.") 

Nonetheless, he refuses to speculate about 
the future ot multimedia or its use in the Him 
and video industries. "One of the things I love 
about this job is that I don't have to predict the 
future," he says. "You can't do that at this 
Stage. All we know about the new computer 
media technologies is that they're quite signif- 
icant and they'll greatly affect how we live and 
work and think. How exactly, which tech- 
nologies exactly — that we don't know." 



Sue Young Wilson is managing editor 
of The Independent. 



/ei/UA VI D 



(212)228-7748 



296 Elizabeth Street, Suite bf 

New York, N.Y. 

10012 

AVID & D/Vision suites 

at reasonable prices 

J?i/),.»AVID is an HM Rifken Productions,lnc. Co. CALL ABOUT Beta SP Camera packages (IKE-57!) and crews 



THEATRICAL SCREENINGS 
OF YOUR FEATURE FILM. 

We will show and market your film 
if it meets our criteria. Please send 
a synopsis, subject matter, time, & 
video to: Sam Siegel 

Mavrick Pictures Inc. 
c/o Thalia Theatre 

250 W. 95th Street 
N.Y.,N.Y. 10025 




January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 19 




^ 



ired Blue 

bnder 




Thinking about abandoning film- or 
videomaking to join the Great Multi- 
media Rush? Take a hint from documen- 
tary-turned-multimedia-maker Jayne 
Loader, who advises that the infobahn 
may take one home to Texas, but it 
won't necessary lead to oil. 

Two years ago Loader, who is best 
known as the co-creator of the film The 
Atomic Cafe (1982), a mocking collage 
of post-World War II propaganda, docu- 
mentary, and newsreel footage about the 
atomic bomb, decamped from New York 
City to return to her hometown of 
Waxahachie, Texas. With husband Eric 
Schwaab, a 14-year veteran of Wall 
Street ("He handles the money end and 
lets me create"), Loader founded a CD- 
ROM production company, EJL 
Productions, to do a project about female avia- 
tors. 

Then, last year, outraged by France's deci- 
sion to resume nuclear testing in the Pacific, 
Loader decided that her protest — and first dig- 
ital project — would be to "spen[d] the year 
putting everything I know — or could beg or 
borrow — about things atomic on CD-ROM." 

This time Loader didn't have to spend years 
searching through dank government archives 
underneath Washington, D.C. Instead, she 
surfed government and other sites on the 
Internet and World Wide Web and down- 
loaded more than 14,000 documents, many 
only recently declassified. She also hooked up 
with Greenpeace after a shipload of their pro- 
testers were seized by the French following the 
Pacific testing announcement and got access to 
their huge archives on nasty matters nuclear. 
And, of course, she revisited the materials she 
and Pierce and Kevin Rafferty had gathered for 
The Atomic Cafe — most of which hadn't fit into 
the 88-minute film. The CD-ROM contains 12 
minutes of film footage from Atomic Cafe, 
which Loader had to license from the Archives 
Project, the team that collaborated on the film. 



Media Over-Loader 

JK. Docu.:m_e:r~Lt:a:riarL Goes Digital 




The other 28 minutes of video on the disk is 
public domain: Atomic Cafe outtakes or new, 
often freshly declassified clips. 

Loader and Schwaab recruited their CD- 
ROM production team locally, via the Internet 
and computer conventions. Thomas Hughes, a 
23-year-old computer whiz and Webmaster 
from Fort Worth, did much of the program- 
ming and maintains EJLs Web site (http:// 
www.publicshelter.com/). Two Dallas-based 
companies, CircumStance and Vision Wise, 
did the interactive design work and provided 
production services. Only the project's three 
Portland-based musicians hail from outside 
Texas. 

"There are tons of talented people out here, 
and, unlike in New York, they tend to be kind 
of underutilized, and therefore less expensive 
and more available," Loader says. "The main 
thing the process showed is that you can leave 
New York and still do this kind of work." 

While Loader spent 14 long months comb- 
ing online archives, she kept in touch with the 



rest of the team over the Internet. Hughes 
and some of the design team and musicians 
then "camped out" at Loader's house for the 
last four months of production. 

The result: the CD-ROM Public Shelter, 
which takes Atomic Cafe's found-footage 
concept fully cyber. Remarkably deep and 
capacious, Public Shelter contains roughly 
1,600 text files, 75 video clips, 400 pho- 
tographs, 10 hours of audio that include 18 
original songs — in all, a full 15 MB of A- 
bomb-and-energy info — plus some suitably 
apocalyptic science fiction. Loader deliber- 
ately modeled the interface as though it were 
a Web site, with 20 home pages — "Los 
Alamos," "Medical Testing," "Peace" — 
accompanied by their own browsers. There is 
no imposed path through the material; no 
table of contents, narrative, or editorial com- 
ment. One wanders the virtual vaults and 
rifles the archives at will, happening on 
comic gems (a clip from the fifties animated 
educational film Duck and Cover, starring 
reptilian songster Bert the Turtle) and revela- 
tions of the terrible (audio memoirs from the 
spouses of Americans killed at home by fall- 
out from the Nevada Test Site). 



20 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



A downside to Public Shelter's depth is that 
one needs quite the hardware setup to experi- 
ence it as it was intended (or at all — this writer 
tried in vain to find a rental computer that 
could play the disk, until Loader solved the 
problem long-distance by asking a graphic 
designer friend to lend the use of her elaborate 
system). Although a 486 processor with 
Windows 3.1, 8 MB of RAM, a local bus video 
card with more than 256 colors, and a 
Windows-compatible soundcard will do the 
trick, ideally one should have a Pentium with 
16 MB of RAM running Windows 95 and 
WaveTalkMIDI. 

As for the money end of things: Loader says 
she's selling enough copies of Public Shelter "to 
keep the wolf from the door," but has hardly hit 
a gusher. While searching for the right distribu- 
tor, she has been selling Public Shelter by mail 
and e-mail order from online sites, cybercafes, 
and film festivals where she has been invited to 
talk about the project. 

She received "a bunch of distribution offers," 
she says, but "they were uniformly bad. In mul- 
timedia, I'm finding, one gets offered deals that 
a filmmaker would never expect or accept — 
like net profit deals with no advance. It's sort of 
like indie film was 30 years ago. There's no 
Sundance or anyplace else you can go where 
multimedia distributors are looking for prod- 
uct." Eventually she did find a distributor who 
offered a share of the gross profits, and at press 
time she has a deal inked out, though not yet 
signed. 

Making Public Shelter has, if nothing else, 
renewed Loader's hotness on the lecture cir- 
cuit; she's recently appeared at venues ranging 
from the New York Video Festival to 
Melbourne, Australia. Between speaking 
engagements, she's continuing work on her 
screenplay about women pilots in 1929 ("like A 
League of Their Own in the air"), which she 
intends to turn not into a movie but a CD- 
ROM that will do double-duty as a historical 
reference and a flight simulator game specifical- 
ly for girls. 

She's also starting yet another project with 
people met on the Internet, this one to provide 
public access to the Net for people in rural 
areas, inner cities, and so on who don't own 
computers. According to her husband — for .it 
press time Loader was off at the Greater Fort 
Lauderdale International Film Festival — 
response to this latest foray on the information 
highway, at least, has been "overwhelming." 

Sut Yen nc; Wilson 



AmiRlCAN 
mOHTflGE 



AVID 



.«* 



900 



AVID 900 NOW AVAILABLE 
FILM & VIDEO PRODUCTION 
POST-PRODUCTION SPECIALISTS 
Hi8 TO BETACAM TIMECODED DUBS 
J BETACAM SP PACKAGES from $300 



lOTH YEAR ANNIVERSARY 



I voice 334-8283 334-8345 fax 
375 West B'way 3R. NY. NY 10012 



Gall fa Wvik! 
Through the Lens 6 

WYBE-7V35, Philadelphia's innov- 
ative public television station, 

seeks work for a series featuring 

film and video from independent 
media artists from around the 

nation. This 10-week series airs 
in prime time each spring. All 

styles welcome; shorts up to 30 

minutes preferred. Acquisition 

fee: $25 per minute. 

DEADLINE IS JANUARY 22, 

1996. For an entry form, write to 

Through the Lens 6 

WYBE-TV35 

6070 Ridge Avenue 

Philadelphia, PA 19128 

(215)483-3900 

fax (215) 483-6908 



FILM/VIDEO ARTS 

Persistence Of vision ... Since 1968 



AVID 1000 



Beta SP 



On-Une 



3/4" SP On-Line 



Priced for the independent! 



Great deals on Flatbeds, VHS, 3/4" and Hi-8 Off-Line Editing 

Call for free literature on these services, 

Equipment Rental & Media Education programs 



Film/Video Arts • 817 Broadway, 2nd Fl. • NYC 
212/673-9361 (t) • 212/475-3467 (f) 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 21 



Tent Information 



Previous Image 



Next Image 



% 



of i 




Access Notes 



Agriculture 

Architectural Style 

Beginning Date Depicted 

City or Town 

City, Town, Neighborhood 

Commercial & Retail 

Concept 

Contact Address 

Contact City/Tovn 

Contact Country 

Contact Fax Number 

Contact Name 

Contact Organization 

Contact Phone Number 

Contact State/ Pro v 

Contact Zip Code 

County 



Excellent access; paved 
roads in park. 40 min. 
from downtown Rochester 
via Interstate 390.. 




Beautiful. Lush. 

1 26 Andrews Street. 

Rochester. 

US. 

716-232-4822. 

Jerry Stoeffhaas. 

Roc heste r / Fi nge r La Ices 

Film Office 

716-546-5490. 

New York. 

14604-1 102. 



: 600" cliff walls, three 
: major waterfalls, 
: Whitewater river rapids, 
: 3cenic railroad bridge, 
: log cabins, large dam, all 
: features of "THE GRAND 
: CANYON OF THE EAST". 
: Very film friendly, 
: experienced. NOTE: 
: THERE ARE 7 GROUPS ON 
: LETCH WORTH LOCATIONS. 



Permit/Fee Amount 1 : No charge for permit. 
Permit/Fee Amount 2 : 
Permit/Fee Amount 3 : 
Permit/Fee Amount 4: 
Permit/Fee Amount 5 : 
Permit/Fee Note 



: Some situations may 
: require park police; 
: insurance generally 
: required.. 



Permit/Fee Note 2 : 



o 



Beautiful, lush... Rochester? Kodak's on-line location 
scouting service may help producers come up with 
unexpected possibilities for their shoots. 

Courtesy Kodak 



Kodak's On-line Shortcut for 
Location Scouts 

Tired of waiting weeks to receive informa- 

tion on potential locations for your film? Not 
sure of what the full range of options might be? 
Eastman Kodak is marketing a solution — an 
on-line location scouting service called the 
Eastman Exchange. The service features access 
to photo and location databases from approxi- 
mately 40 film commissions, predominantly in 
the United States but including several inter- 



national commissions as well. 

Created under the auspices of the digital 
division of Kodak's Motion Picture and 
Television business unit, the Eastman Exchange 
was launched last spring after a two-year study 
to assess the needs of producers researching 
information on potential sites and film commis- 
sions seeking to further publicize their 
resources. 

With Kodak aggressively seeking to position 
itself as the principal digital imaging provider in 
the burgeoning electronic marketplace, it 
comes as no surprise that Eastman Exchange's 
central feature is access to digital photographs. 
Nor is it any surprise that the on-line service 
requires the use of proprietary software: 



Kodak's Photo CD technology. 

The start-up software costs $99. After this 
initial output, expenses are proportionate to 
use. Subscribers are charged only for on-line 
time ($1.92 per minute) with no monthly fee. 
The software is available for both Mac (at 
least System 7.1) and Windows (version 3.1 
or later; with MS-DOS, version 5.0 or later). 
A minimum of 12 MB of memory is recom- 
mended for best results, and the software's 
modem compatibility is reasonably flexible 
(14.4 baud minimum). Both installation and 
general operations are simple and demand 
virtually no reconfiguration unless you are 
trying to work with insufficient memory. 

Once on-line, the user interface is rela- 



22 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



tively effortless. After selecting the film com- 
missions you wish to browse, all you need to do 
is enter your search criteria (for instance, "trail- 
er parks and rural and exterior"), similar to 
constructing a search on the Lexis/Nexis on- 
line research database. The service also pro- 
vides pull-down lists of categories and charac- 
teristics, such as "Architectural style," 
"Facilities," or "Geography and Geology." You 
can choose whether to download all the images 
selected or just a sample; images are then dis- 
played in contact sheet format. 

Four categories of resolution and image com- 
pression are available. The degree of compres- 
sion determines the retrieval time. Magnifying 
and decompressing images, which must be done 
while you are still on-line, can sometimes take 
a while. For example, viewing a single image as 
a "design proof" (the highest resolution avail- 
able) can take one to two minutes, but a con- 
tact sheet of 10 "thumbnail sketches" (the low- 
est resolution) will take only about 30 seconds. 

At present, the text-based information that 
accompanies the images is minimal. While the 
files designate a number of useful fields, such as 
permit types and pricing, the information is 
rarely filled in by the film commissions. 
Fortunately, location scouts needing these 
details have the option of using the service's 
bulletin board, which allows for direct e-mail 
correspondence with the film commissions. In 
fact, because of the ongoing interaction that 
scouting necessitates, the service's gateways to 
the commissions and its centralized message [! 
board may be its most immediately pragmatic 
features. 

The bottom-line is that Eastman Exchange 
can facilitate the initial stages of location scout- 
ing, but follow-up and the evaluation of final 
site choices remain beyond the service's capac- 
ity. For now, what makes the service most inter- 
esting is not its immediate application but 
rather the implications it has for the future of 
the media business. 

For Kodak, this service is only an initial step 
in its efforts to position itself as a dominant 
player within a digitized film industry. A more 
elaborate example is Kodak's collaboration with 
Pacific Bell's Media Park, a broadband commu- 
nications network and "virtual production stu- 
dio" designed to provide producers with access 
to a range of services. Both the Eastman 
Exchange and its stock photography counter- 
part, the Kodak Picture Exchange, are partici- 
pating in the Media Park plan, as are such com- 
panies as stock footage provider Archive Films, 
digital postproduction company Pacific Ocean 



sponsored by 

The Independent Film Channel, 

Bravo Cable, and the 

Detroit Filmmakers Coalition 



FIFTH 



ANNUAL 




Metropolitan 
Film Festival 



• CALL FOR ENTRIES • 

Call or write for entry forms. 

Submission Deadline: January 17, 1995 

Festival Dates: February 7 - 1 0, I 995 

All formats accepted / No content or time restrictions 

313-41 7-5426 / MFF, P.O. BOX 39 1 47, DETROIT, Ml 48239, US 



mmmmmmmm 



COUUffl 



INSURANCE 



Discounted Liability 

Insurance 
for AIVF members 



Contact: Debra Kozee 
1-800-257-0883 

56 Beaver Street 

New York, NY 10004-2436 

tel: 212-742-9850 • fax:212-742-0671 



CBS 



CALL FOR 
ENTRIES 

deadline: march 1 



• June 14-23, 1996 

• 16mm & 35mm 

• Juried Competition 

• Audience Awards 

• Features and shorts 

• Narrative 

• Documentary 

• Animation 

• Experimental 

ENTRY FORMS: 

Florida Film Festival 

1300 S. Orlando Ave. 

Maitland, FL 32751 

Tel : 407/629/5725 
Fax: 407/629/6870 
email: filmfest@gate.net 

World Wide Web: 

http : //www . magi cnet . net/enz i an/ 



official sponsor: 



^S 



^b 




Uideo Artist - Two Vear Position 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Visual Arts Program, is seeking an 
artist with a broad approach to teach video subjects and to be part of a team in a 
foundations in art program for undergraduates. Candidates should be interested 
in working wiUi highly motivated students majoring in a wide variety of fields 
odier than art. They should be able to present their discipline as a mode for 
thinking and inquiry with emphasis on the process as well as on the finished 
project. Candidates should be able to relate their discipline to historical, 
aesthetic and philosophical issues and ideas, and should be able to 
communicate and work with people from other disciplines. Candidates must 
have teaching experience and a national exhibit record. Send resume, 
statement of teaching philosophy to Professor Edward Lcvine, Visual Art. 
Program, N5 1-315 , 77 Mass. Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 by March 1, 1996. 
MIT IS AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/ EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 



January/February 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 23 



THE 




A non-profit media arts organi- 
zation providing access to state- 
of-the-art video post-production 
services for artists and indepen- 
dent producers at drastically 
discounted rates ■■ Wide range 
of services available ™ Standby 
publishes FELIX, A Journal of 
Media Arts and Communication. 



Some of Standby's hourly rates: 

• Interformat editing: $85 

• One inch editing: $120 

• Non-linear editing: $60 

• Audio post-production: $60 

• Chyron: $10 

• ADO: $10 

First extra service free! 



PO Box 184, Prince Street Station 
New York, NY 10012 
Phone: (212)219-0951 
Fax: (212)219-0563 



SHOOTING IN 
THE SOOTH? 

Check out why Allied handled 
28 features in 1994! 

* Quality processing (16, Super 16 
& 35mm) 

* Overnight processing/A.M. dailies 

* Video dailies with KEYKODE™, 
TLC Edit Controller yy 

* Interlock - Nagra T, 16 ™ 
& 35 mag stripe 

* Off-line, multi-format on-line 
& D-2 editing 

* Complete sound post facility for 
film & video - SSL Screen Sound, 
Foley, mixing, editing 

* Package pricing available 




• ALL CINDER 
ONE ROOF 



Digital Technologies Corp. 



6305 N. O'Connor Road, Suite 1 1 1 

Irving, TX 75039-3510 

Tel: (214) 869-0100 

Fax: (214) 869-2117 or (214) 432-1710 



Post, and talent/casting database Screen Test 
On-Line. Scheduled to be fully active by late 
spring, Media Park will include access to infor- 
mation on locations, talent, equipment, props, 
and crew; the potential to generate and deliver 
animation, computer graphics, and audio on- 
line; the capability to locate, review, and license 
archival footage and sound effects owned by 
Kodak and other collaborators; and the capaci- 
ty to screen and edit footage from several loca- 
tions simultaneously, store the material elec- 
tronically, and convert it to the required film or 
tape format when necessary. In short, a facility 
like Media Park would significantly diminish 
the problems of time and distance during all 
stages of production. 

It remains to be seen how independents will 
fare in this process of consolidating services. 
The danger, of course, is that through deregu- 
lated business alliances, telecommunications 
companies can secure control over pricing 
while simultaneously making their services 
essential to all aspects of production. Pricing 
could be geared to studio budgets, with little 
incentive to cater to smaller, low-budget pro- 
jects. 

The flipside, however, is that prices will 
decrease as new systems and services are intro- 
duced and independents can gain low-cost 
access to yesterday's cutting-edge as more afflu- 
ent producers move on to the latest high-end 
product. For all the rhetoric about the new dig- 
ital age, in many respects it remains business as 
usual. 

Eastman Exchange can be reached at (800) 
816-2233. For further information on Pacific 
Bell's Media Park, call (800) 627-PARK. 

Yosha Goldstein 

Yosha Goldstein is a freelance writer and independent 
videomaker living in Brooklyn. 



Composer Contact! Plays 
Musical Matchmaker 

It might be said of filmmakers and music 
composers that never the twain shall meet. 
Since they move in different circles profession- 
ally, filmmakers needing an original score and 
composers struggling to build a portfolio of film 
work often have trouble finding one another. 
Now, Harvestworks has what it hopes is a solu- 
tion. Formed in 1977 as a production and post- 
production facility for electronic musicians, 
Harvestworks has grown into a "career-service" 
organization for musicians and digital-media 
artists. After about a year of development, the 



nonprofit group has unveiled an interactive 
database of composers — complete with digi- 
tal samples of their work — geared towards 
independent producers in search of fresh 
musical talent. 

Tentatively called Composer Contact!, 
the database allows users to browse via a 
touch-screen interface similar to that of an 
automated teller machine. At the moment, 
users have to show up in person at 
Harvestworks' SoHo offices, but once cer- 
tain technical and legal hurdles are cleared, 
the organization hopes to launch the system 
on-line. 

According to Carol Parkinson, Harvest- 
works' co-director, Composer Contact! grew 
out of a long-standing desire to bridge the 
gap between filmmakers and composers. "We 
heard from the composers, 'Gee, it's really 
tough to break into the industry'," she 
explains. "And the industry said, 'We really 
try to get composers who have done work for 
other filmmakers so that we know what they 
do.' So the issue became how do we break 
into that industry, because it was one that 
was based so much on referrals." 

Harvestworks began a series of meetings 
with Tracy Williams, director of Meet the 
Composer, a nonprofit musicians' support 
organization that was similarly interested in 
establishing a composers database for film- 
makers, choreographers, and multimedia 
artists to draw upon. Meet the Composer 
agreed to fund the development of a proto- 
type with a $15,000 grant, and Composer 
Contact! was born. 

To design the system, Harvestworks 
recruited Barry Greenhut, a Stanford-edu- 
cated programmer engaged in the develop- 
ment of interactive media projects with the 
Manhattan-based Spin Cycle Post company. 
Adding to Greenhut's enthusiasm was the 



— — — 
Composei 
Contact 
Service 




An opening window of Composer Contact!, which aims to 
partner up filmmakers and composers. 

Courtesy Harvestworks 



24 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



YOUR LIBRARY 

HAVETHE 
INDEPENDENT 

Take this coupon to 

your school or public 

librarian and request a 

subscription today! 



10 issues/yr. 

Library subscription rate $75 

($90 foreign) 

Published by the Foundation for 

Independent Video and Film 

ISSN 0731-0589 

Order from FIVF, 

304 Hudson St., 6th fl., NY, NY 10013; 

(212) 807-1400 

EBSCO: (205) 991-6600; 

fax (205) 991-1479. 

FAXON (US): (800) 283-2966; 

CAN (519) 472-1005; 

CAN fax (519) 472-1072 






0GM 



■fa 






J7* 



shSSw 



ORDER THESE BOOKS FROM FIVF 

NEW EDITIONS ■■ ORDER NOW.' 

The AIVF/FIVF Guide to International Film & Video Festivals 

Kathryn Bowser, ed. $29.95 AIVF members; $34.95 others 



The AIVF/FIVF Guide to Film &Video Distributors 

Kathryn Bowser, ed. $19.95 AIVF members; $24-95 others 



The Next Step: A Film and Video Distribution Handbook 

Morrie Warshawski, ed. $19.95 AIVF members; $24-95 others 

$ 

Order all three and save! 

$59.95 AIVF members; $74.95 others $ 



Alternative Visions: Distributing Independent Video in a 
Home Video World by Debra Franco; $9.95 AIVF members; 

$12.95 others $ 



Film and Video Financing by Michael Wiese; $22.95 $_ 



Film Directing Shot by Shot: Visualizing from Concept to 
Screen by Steven D. Katz; $24.95 $ 

Home Video: Producing for the Home Market by Michael 

Wiese; $11.95$ 

The Independent Film & Videomakers Guide by Michael 

Wiese; $13.95 $ 

The P.O.V. Online Experiment by Don Adams & Arlene 
Goldbard; $5.00 incl. postage & handling $ 

Shaking the Money Tree: How to Get Grants and Donations 
for Film and Video by Morrie Warshawski; $24-95 $ 

Postage/handling: US - $3.50 1st book, $1.00 ea. addl; 
Foreign - $5.00 1st book, $1.50 ea. addl $_ . 

TOTAL $ 



Make checks payable to FIVF, 304 Hudson St., 6th fl., 
NY, NY 10013; or charge by phone: (212) 807-1400 
or fax: (21 2) 463-851 9. 



S9& 



HWfT*. 



Jaw 



■V. 



b&dK 



fact that he himself is an aspiring film com- 
poser. 

"It's a dream come true that it would 
exist," Greenhut says. "I knew people in 
Hollywood, I knew publishers, I knew people 
at record companies, I knew people at stu- 
dios, and I still couldn't break in." 

Greenhut began by designing a question- 
naire for composers that asks for autobio- 
graphical information, plus specifics on each 
piece of music submitted. This data, togeth- 
er with the artist's photo and a three-minute 
sample of music — which can be divided 
among as many as five separate works — are 
entered into the database. 

Using the interface, an interested produc- 
er can choose from selections organized 
according to musical genre (jazz, classical, 
popular, and ambient "out there" music are a 
few examples), specific titles, composers' 
names, or performance venues. After view- 
ing the information on-screen and listening 
to the music samples, the producer can press 
a button and receive a print-out of contact 
information for the desired composers. 
Currently, there are about 20 composers on 
the system, all of whom are Harvestworks 
members. By June, Parkinson anticipates the 
number to grow to about 50. 

To use the system, a producer has to be a 
Harvestworks member, which costs $40 per 
year. The group then charges $10 for the first 
composer's name and $5 for each subsequent 
name. If a commission results, Harvestworks 
may decide to charge composers a finders' 
fee. 

Harvestworks hopes to have a second pro- 
totype and public launch ready by next sum- 
mer. However, both Parkinson and Greenhut 
are already looking beyond that to ways 
Composer Contact! can reach an even 
greater pool of users. The World Wide Web is 
one way. (The hold-up on a Web site has 
been the issue of copyright protection. 
According to Parkinson and Greenhut, the 
group has been working with a lawyer to 
devise an agreement for copyright holders to 
license works solely tor on-line use.) Also, 
Greenhut says he envisions packaging the 
database as a multi-disk system, in which the 
core program is ottered as a CD-ROM, and 
the database, which can be periodically 
updated, is distributed on floppy disks. 

Most of the composers now in the system 
are ha>ed in New York City, bur Parkinson 
envisions producing regional or nationwide 
databases it Harvestworks can find the right 



partners. Kiosks placed in the offices of film 
societies in major cities are one option, she says. 
Linking with a commercial software developer 
is another. 

"We're always looking for new partnerships," 
she says. "There's all sorts of new media start- 
up companies, so we're looking at possibly 
licensing [Composer Contact!]. It does cross 
over to that new media exploration, the cre- 
ation of software." 

Harvestworks, 596 Broadway, Ste. 602, New 
York, NY 10012; (212) 431-1130; fax: 431- 
8473; harvestW@panix.com; WWW http:// 
www.avsi.com/harvestworks/ 

Steve Janas 

Steve janas is a freelance writer and editor based in 

New Jersey. 



Tech Heads and Artists Unite 
at SIGGRAPH '95 

This year Los Angeles played host to the 
22nd annual conference of ACM SIGGRAPH 
(Association for Computing Machinery Special 
Interest Group on Computer Graphics), held 
August 6-11. Of the 40,000 people who attend 
SIGGRAPH, increasing numbers are coming 
from the film world — both the noncommercial 
sector and the Hollywood studios. I ran into a 
filmmaker from Atlanta, an ex-teacher who 
now works for Microsoft, artist/engineers from 
the Human Interface Lab (a virtual reality lab) 
at the University of Washington, and video art 
curators from the Museum of Modern Art and 
Long Beach Museum of Art. Worlds are truly 
converging. 

The media hype surrounding SIGGRAPH 
focused on the marriages of Hollywood and 
Silicon Valley that are resulting in new multi- 
media companies. On the high profile end 
there's DreamWorks SKG (the Steven 
Spielberg dreamteam linked with Microsoft), 
Digital Domain (founded by screenwriter/direc- 
tor James Cameron and ex-IBM folks), and the 
divisions being created by entertainment giants 
such as Disney Interactive and Fox Animation. 
But at all levels, creative artists, especially ani- 
mators and multimedia artists, were being 
wined and dined by producers from Hollywood 
hungrily vying tor new talent. 

Out of the hype at SIGGRAPH a strong 
message emerged: there is ,i desperate need for 
creative people who can work in this new con- 
vergence zone. This should be good news for 
independent mediamakers interested in retool- 
ing their skills tor digital multimedia and willing 



0GO0OO0G 



FEBRUARY 2 1996 



** % 



£& 




1/2 'VHS (NTSC) 
3/4'UMATlC 



For Entry Form Write 
bk5 muddy film festival 

Department ol Cinema & Photography 

Mailcocte6610 

Southern fflmots Urwersity at 

Carbondale 

Carbontiale. L 62901 -6610 



Call or Fax 

Telephone 
618-453-1482 

Facsfrule 

618-453-3492 




|VZ 




January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 25 



HARVESTWORKS 



MULTIMEDIA PROGRAM 

FALL 95 CLASSES 



Designing & Programming Web Page 

Mon. December 4& 11 6:30-9:30 

Intro to Adobe Premiere 4.0 

Mondays. November 6, 13,20. 7:30-9:30 

Intro to After Effects 2.0 

Weds., November 29. Dec 6,12 7:30-9:30 

Intro to Multimedia Production 

Saturday, November 18, 1:00-4.00 

Intro to Fractal Painter 3.0 

Thurs, November 30, Dec. 7, 14, 7:30-9:30 

Interface Design 

Tuesdays, November 7. 14, 21 7:30-9:30 

Advanced Macromedia Director 

Fridays, November 3, 10, 17, 7:30-9:30 

Digital Video for Film & Videomakers 

Fridays, December 1,8, 15, 7:30-10:00 

Location Sound Recording 

Saturdays, December 2 & 9 12:00-3:00 



To register or to receive a complete class 
schedule contact Harvestworks at 596 
Broadway, Suite 602 at 431- 1130 ext. 16. 
New Multimedia Production Studio rental 
rates also available. All classes are 
satisfaction guaranteed and limited to 12 
students. Includes 2 hrs of hands-on lab 



http://www.avsi.com/harvesrworks I 




ViuEOt 



Affordable Logging and 

Videotape Editing... 
Automated QuickTime™ 
Movies from your VCR 




Turns your computer into a 

powerful video editing utility. 

Controls consumer, industrial and 

most professional video equipment. 

Supports ViSCA and RS 422 VTRs. 

Infrared control for the record device and 
Head and Tail video Snap-Shots™ with all 
QuickTime™ video boards. Now supports 
Panasonic AG! 970 & 5700 





14 Ross Avenue, Millis, MA 02054 

(506) 376-3712 Fax (506) 376-3714 

Orders Only - (&00)253-5553 

America Online/key word-Abbate 



to work as part of a 
team. 

In his keynote 
address, Apple Com- 
puter founder Steve 
Jobs put the computer 
graphics industry in his- 
torical perspective, ac- 
knowledging the influ- 
ential legacy of film- 
making. "In the same 
way films from the late 
19th century, such as 
those by the Lumiere 
brothers, are consid- 
ered cinematic land- 
marks," said Jobs, 
"today's features that 
employ CGI (computer 
graphics imaging) tech- 
niques are probably 
going down in history as 
entertainment industry 
turning points." 

Jobs's remarks link- 
ing CGI to traditional 
filmmaking were 

echoed in the Educator's Program by Jeff Light 
of Industrial Light & Magic (ILM). Light stud- 
ied and taught filmmaking at Ohio State 
University before joining ILM in 1990. His 
filmmaking and fine arts background serves 
him well in his current job as computer graph- 
ics supervisor. It provides him with a firm 
grounding when making creative decisions, he 
testified, and enables him to think like a pro- 
ject's director and communicate in the lan- 
guage of filmmaking. "I've seen people come 
here with great computer skills who get trapped 
when it comes to making aesthetic decisions," 
he said. "They seem to run out of steam." 

The lesson Light had to offer: You can train 
an artist to use the tools of a computer much 
more easily than you can train a computer pro- 
grammer to be an artist. His advice to indepen- 
dent mediamakers was to learn media software 
programs (such as computer animation) and 
nonlinear digital video editing, and be able to 
talk to computer programmers intelligently in 
order to maintain creative control. Light 
acknowledged the value of drawing on the his- 
tory and aesthetics of experimental mediamak- 
ing. "People out there in the independent 
media community might be surprised that, even 
at the highest levels of traditional Hollywood 
filmmaking, there is the same need for ingenu- 
ity and creativity as there is in the media arts 




Need a career roadmap? Both SIGGRAPH and Ziff-Davis offer new guides to 
new media. 

field." 

More crossover artists appeared on the 
panel "Interactive Multimedia: A New 
Creative Frontier or Just a New Com- 
modity?" Amanda Goodenough, Rodney 
Greenblatt, Mikki Halpin, George Legrady, 
and Erik Loyer all came from traditional arts 
backgrounds in theater, filmmaking, car- 
tooning, or sculpture and are now producing 
CD-ROMs for Voyager and Inscape. All 
emphasized that they are artists first, and 
that by learning the computer tools of inter- 
active media, they are able to explore new 
forms of creativity that suit their aesthetics 
and ideas. 

"There is a tremendous appetite for artists 
now in the new media industry," said 
Michael Nash, president of Inscape, a hot 
CD-ROM production company that he 
founded in 1994 with backing from Warner 
Bros, and HBO. "Experienced artists with 
the right skill set have a lot of leverage. 
Artists like Jim Ludtke, who first produced a 
CD-ROM for The Residents, can now pick 
and choose projects." Nash is also seeing 
"traditional" video artists, such as Janice 
Tanaka, teach themselves how to create CD- 
ROMs and find partners who can raise 
money and launch their work. 

Nash himself was formerly in the nonprof- 



26 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



it media arts field, working as video art curator 
at the Long Beach Museum of Art. He now 
believes the nonprofit world's days are num- 
bered and advocates the jump to the private 
sector as the best hope for artists wanting to 
explore new media. Nash also promotes the 
idea that artists with the right set of skills — i.e., 
media production and computer expertise — 
can actually impact how these new technolo- 
gies will develop. 

Those who agree will find a helpful resource 
in ACM SIGGRAPH's Computer Graphics 
Career Handbook [SIGGRAPH, 1991; 2nd ed. 
due this spring; (212) 626-0500], which lists 
careers in computer graphics by categories and 
includes career profiles of people working in 
CGI, tips on how to find a job, and a roster of 
colleges and universities that teach computer 
graphics. Practical advice is sprinkled through- 
out the book. Kevin Bjorke, a technical director 
for animation at R/Greenberg Associates, 
counsels students of computer graphics film "to 
focus their study not on algorithms, but on 
their own creativity.. ..Computer graphics is 
quickly blending into the mainstream of 
film/videomaking, and thus it's better to under- 
stand editing than enumeration, and probably 
better to read Moby Dick. ..than A Survey of 
Multidimensional Data Projection Methods. 
Technology changes rapidly; people and mean- 
ing do not." 

Another great resource book is Careers in 
Multimedia by vivid studios, [Ziff-Davis Press, 
1995; (800) 688-0448]. It gives the big picture, [f 
covering all the different platforms of multime- 
dia, the types of projects being produced, the 
industries now producing multimedia, the types 
of jobs available, and even how to find a job. 
There are great quotes scattered throughout 
that underscore the continuing need for cre- 
ativity, media production knowledge, and life 
skills. Karen Burch, producer at Synapse 
Technologies, says, "This industry is calling 
people with very eclectic backgrounds. It does- 
n't put you at a disadvantage if you've done one 
thing all of your life or if you're just fresh out of 
school and you studied fine art... I look for peo- 
ple who have had lots of different kinds of 
experiences, because that says to me they 
weren't afraid to change courses." 

Robin Reidy Oppknheimer 

Robin Reidy l )ppenheimer is a consultant working m the 

converging areas of art, education, and technology. She 

is special projects director at 91 1 Media Arts Center in 

Seattle, and the former director of 91 1 and IMAGE 

hdm/Video Center in Atlanta 



Synch ronicity 
Sound 

Digital Audio Workstation with 
Video & Film Lock up 

Full Sound Track Preparation & 
Editing 

Dialogue, Effects, Music Editing 
& Sound Design 

Digital Production Recording 

Multi-Format Mixing Facility 

Interformat Sound Transfers 

Overnite T.C. Stripes & Window Dubs 

AIVF Member & Student Discount 

611 Broadway, Cable Bldg., Suite 907 H 
New York, NY 10012 

(212) 254-6694 
Fax: (212) 254-5086 



THE 



LOW 

BUDGET 

VIDEO 

BIBLE 

BY CUFF ROTH 



\ 30-day 
money 
back 
guarantee 

Call with 
credit-card, 

or send 
check/m.o. 

Desktop 

Video 

Systems 

Box 668 

NYC 10272 

Just $27.95 
plus $3 

shipping 
NY residents 

add $2.31 

Hi8 and S-VHS 

SECRETS REVEALED! 

The essential do-it-yourself guide to creating 
top-notch video on a shoestring budget 

Editing, shooting strategies, 

time code systems, audio 

tracks, computer-based 

desktop video, & much 

more! 400 pages. 

ORDER NOW (24-hr) 
1 -800-247-6553 




January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 27 




Toronto Turns 20 

TTl^Le Toronto International 
Film ^Uk. Festival 



by Patricia 
Thomson 

AS THE AIRPORT SHUTTLE BUS HEADS TOWARDS 

the lakefront city of Toronto, bristling in the dis- 
tance with spiky postmodern skyscrapers, a radio 
deejay incants a list of celebrity names: Sting, Mia 
Farrow, Diane Keaton, Quentin Tarantino. "The 
stars are coming out tonight," booms the deejay, 
who then suggests places to stand to catch a 
glimpse of the glitterati sweeping into town for 
the opening night gala of the Toronto 
International Film Festival. 

He also treats hearty partiers to the news that 
the downtown bars are staying open late that 
week (September 7-16) — a clear sign of how 
Toronto merchants open their arms to this festi- 
val, now 20 years old and a major cultural event 
and cash cow for the city. The festival brings in 
$30 million (Canadian) each year to the 
province, including $7.4 million in tourism, 
according to a 1993 Decima research study. This 
cash infusion, however, has not stopped the 
Canadian government from taking a page from 
the ledger of U.S. conservative politics, which 
ignores the long-term financial (to say nothing of 
nonmaterial) benefits of supporting the arts. In 
1995, the Toronto International Film Festival 
Group, which runs the $4-6 million festival, 
among other programs, had to make do with 
$223,260 less from the federal and provincial gov- 
ernments. "It's like a success story where sudden- 
ly the brakes are being applied, which is sad," fes- 
tival director Piers Handling told Variety. 

Despite the cutbacks, festival organizers pre- 
sented a full-scale event this year, with 298 films 
in all, including 72 shorts and more than 150 fea- 
tures making their world or North American pre- 
mieres. 

The Toronto International Film Festival used 
to be called the Festival of Festivals, and it's easy 
to see why. This massive event is more like a bun- 
dle of diverse festivals rolled into one. (Twenty 
years ago, it had a different meaning, being creat- 
ed as a showcase for the best films from the spring 
and summer fests.) At the high-gloss end, as the 
deejay indicated, there are stars and preeminent 



directors aplenty for paparazzi and fans 
This year's galas and special presentations 
included films by Gus Van Sant (To Die 
For), Diane Keaton (Unstrung Heroes), Sean 
Penn (The Crossing Guard), Woody Allen 
(Might)! Aphrodite), Carl Franklin (Devil in a 
Blue Dress), Darrell James Roodt (Cry, the 
Beloved Country), and the Four Rooms 
quartet, Allison Anders, Alexandre 
Rockwell, Robert 
Rodriguez, 
and Quentin 
Tarantino. 
For more 




from 20 countries this year. But on 
top of this, the festival also offered 
substantial sidebars of world cinema, 
including Asian Horizons, 
Latin American Panorama, 
Planet Africa, Hungarian 
Rhapsodies, and Per- 
spective Canada. 
If that's not enough to 
overwhelm the most 
dedicated and caf- 
feinated cinephile, 
there was also the 
festival's "official 
program of discov- 
ery": First Cinema, 
a sidebar initiated 
1991 
that is 




place was awash in world cinema that's hard to 
catch outside of the festival circuit. Those going 
for broke could easily pack a 10-day schedule with 
films by top notch directors whose works too 
rarely reach these shores — Wong Kar-wai (Fallen 
Angels), Theo Angelopoulos (Ulysses' Gaze), 
Michelangelo Antonioni (Beyond the Clouds), 
Michael Verhoeven (M31 Mother's Courage), 
Jacques Rivette (Haut has fragile), Lars von Trier 
(The Kingdom), Nicolas Roeg (Two Deaths), 
Mathieu Kassovitz (La haine), and many more. 
These titles were mostly clustered in the 
Contemporary World Cinema Programme, the 
festival's oldest and largest section, with 65 films 



devoted to feature debuts. Of the 30 films 
selected this year, almost half were by U.S. inde- 
pendents. Some were familiar from the 1995 
festival circuit (Jennifer Montgomery's Art for 
Teachers of Children, Theodore Thomas' Frank 
and Ollie, James Mangold's Heavy), but many 
others were North American premieres (Hal 
Salwen's Denise Calls Up, Daphna Kastner's 
French Exit, John Sullivan's sleepover, Monique 
Gardenberg's Janipapo, and Stacy Title's Last 
Supper, among others) . 

"I'm feeling like a minnow," says Title. "This 
is such a huge festival with huge movies, with 
huge powerhouses behind them. You see a 



28 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



movie like Devil in a Blue Dress or Unstrung 
Heroes or even Crossing Guard, and there's an 
entourage attached to it and just a sort of life 
force that goes towards the marketing of it at 
this festival." 

It's true the publicity machines stoking the 
launch of studio films are sizable operations 
here (Columbia Pictures, for instance, not only 
held a press conference for To Die For, they also 
took over a suite and seven rooms at the Four 
Seasons hotel for print and TV press inter- 
views) . 

But it's also true that Toronto's reputation as 
a festival loved by filmmakers owes to the fact 
that smaller films have plenty of opportunities 
for accomplishing a variety of business and mar- 
keting objectives. With no official competition 
to hog the limelight, Toronto does have a more 
egalitarian feel than Berlin, Cannes, and 
Sundance. Big and little films coexist without 
quite so flagrant a pecking order; each finds its 
niche and its viewers — and there are plenty to 
go around. Audiences number around 200,000, 
with approximately 1,000 registered producers, 
distributors, programmers, and agents. 

Though without an official market, Toronto 
has become a required stop on the buyers' cir- 
cuit. About 300 buyers and sellers were on hand 
this year, including top staff from Miramax, 
October, Samuel Goldwyn, and Fine Line 
Features, plus dozens of TV buyers, art house 
and museum programmers, and festival direc- 
tors from around the world. 

Thus the name of the game for the majority 
of U.S. independents at Toronto is sales. John 
Sullivan, the 26-year-old director of sleepover, 
typified this quest, announcing during his film's 
Q&A and at every other opportunity that "all 
rights are available." ("I'm totally, totally out of 
money," he would later add less publicly.) 
Sullivan says he met with "the usual suspects" 
about distribution of his micro-budget feature, 
the story of a bullying male friendship and a 
night's partying gone awry. (While Sullivan did 
not come away from Toronto with a deal for 
domestic distribution, he did make contact 
there with reps from the Australian/New 
Zealand theatrical market and is currently 
negotiating a sale.) 

In terms (it the visibility sleepover received in 
the First Cinema section, Sullivan was com- 
pletely satisfied. "There's the larger festival 
that's going on -t. munis people ,uiJ gala pre- 
mieres — but in terms ot the First Cinema and 
Contemporary World Cinema groupings, Un- 
people that are working within that world, mak- 
ing decisions and getting films discovered, ate 
all here looking at those films. So it's almost like 
tun testn.ils are going on," says Sullivan. "I 



don't feel left out at all. I feel it's going on, and 
we're going on, and both worlds are completely 
valid." 

First Cinema director Stacy Title had the luxu- 
ry of waltzing into Toronto arm-in-arm with a dis- 
tributor, Sony Picture Classics, which had 
acquired worldwide rights to The Last Supper a few 
months earlier. "This was a 'what do we have?' fes- 
tival," says the director of her black comedy about 
a group of liberal grad students in Iowa who poi- 
son an assortment of hate-mongers they invite to 
their Sunday night dinners. Because of its general- 
ly packed houses and diverse audiences, Toronto is 
widely considered one of the best places to gauge 
public reaction to a film. (There's many a tale 
about distributors reconsidering a film they once 
shunned after seeing it in Toronto with one of 
these crowds.) Since The Last Supper's launch date 
isn't until March, their mission at Toronto was 
"subtle," Title explains. "What we wanted to do is 
see what audiences thought of it: Did we get it 
right? We recut the third reel a little bit. Because 
we never had a real audience, we never tested or 
anything, we thought this would be a great place 
to present it to the public and see if they liked it." 

Like most of the festival's films, Last Supper had 
two public screenings — both packed, "which is so 
important for a comedy," says Title. "It did really 
well; I was so happy. And they were very different 
audiences. Friday was boisterous, loud; they 
laughed more at the jokes. But the transition to 
the dark sections was harder for them. Yesterday's 
audience was taking it much more seriously, and 
they stayed with it in a much more intense way. It 
was fascinating for me to watch." The next step, 
says Title, was for Sony to do follow-up calls to 
film professionals who were in the audience before 
fine-tuning strategies for its spring release. 

Perception is everything, at times, and Toronto 
is widely perceived to hold the power to launch a 
hit (and careers), or at least to get the momentum 
rolling. Its track-record is one the film industry 
takes seriously: My Beautiful Laundrette, 
Smithereens, The Unbelievable Truth, Blood Simple, 




Drugstore Cowboy, Roger & Me, Reservoir Dogs, 
and Crumb are just a few of the titles that took off 
at Toronto. Of course, predictions there are not 
infallible. Priest, the hit of the 1994 festival, 
promptly fizzled at the box office despite critical 
raves, and To Die For seems headed down the same 
path, though this mordant black comedy was one 
of the festival's most enthusiastically embraced 
films. 

Another festival favorite — which has yet to 
live or die at the box office — is Welcome to the 
Dollhouse, a low-budget labor of love by Todd 
Solondz that had its world premiere at Toronto. 
"No serious player in this business would have 
financed a movie about this little girl," says 
Solondz, who penned the script about an 11 -year- 
old New Jersey girl going through the painfully 
grim humiliations of adolescence. But once the 
buzz started, all the industry players wanted a 
look. 

"My primary objective is to get domestic the- 
atrical in motion," the director quietly stated the 
day he arrived in Toronto, and lo, within a few 
weeks, Sony Pictures Classics had snapped it up, 
beating out October and Miramax. They current- 
ly plan an April release. (Sony also picked up 
Celluloid Closet, Rob Epstein and Jeffrey 
Friedman's long-awaited documentary about gays 
and lesbians in Hollywood films.) 

But the 36-year-old director had already lived 
through one brush with "overnight success" and 
wasn't about to let the deal warp his thinking. 
"This script was written just when I was finishing 
my first movie, really to redeem myself from the 
horror of that experience," Solondz confesses, 
referring to his first feature, Fear, Anxiety, and 
Depression, released by Samuel Goldwyn six years 
ago. This was a project that, on the surface, looked 
like every film student's dream: Solondz's popular 
NYU short was screened in Los Angeles and 
caught the attention of Scott Rudin, then presi- 
dent of 20th Century Fox, who offered him a 
three-picture writing deal. This was quickly fol- 
lowed by a three-picture deal with Columbia. 
"The only thing I really liked about these deals 
was telling everyone I had them," Solondz 
quips. He squirms uncomfortably when talking 
about his first feature, produced by 
Propaganda Pictures. "Had I made the right 
choices, it could have been a good experience. 
1 don't blame anyone; sometimes these things 



One of the few documentaries in Toronto's line-up 
this year was Synthetic Pleasures, lara Lee's look at 
the ways we try to control our world today — from 
nanotechnology to indoor skiing and surfing rinks to 
smart drugs, virtual reality, and cyber sex. It was 
also the best merchandized film, offering mouse 
pads (pictured), clothing, bags, plus a Web site 
(http://www.panix.com/liao/sp/). 
Courtesy filmmakers 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 29 



ANN ARBOR 

FILM 

FESTIVAL 



MARCH 12-17, 1996 

CALL FOR 
ENTRIES 



16mm independent & experimental 
films of all genres: documentary, 
animation, narrative, & experimental 

JUDGES 

Craig Baldwin, San Francisco-based experi- 
mental filmmaker known for his work with 
archival footage; Robb Moss, documentary 
filmmaker and film department faculty member 
at Harvard University's Carpenter Center; and 
Christine Panushka, 
experimental animator and 
department chair of the Experi- 
mental Animation Program in the 
School of Film/Video at CalArts. 

ENTRY FEES 

For each film entered: 

$32 U.S. entries; $37 foreign & Canadian entries 

INFORMATION 

Call, write, fax, e-mail for brochure/entry form; 

Ann Arbor Film Festival 

P.O. Box 8232, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48107 
Phone: 313/995-5356 
Fax: 313/995-5396 
e-mail: vicki@honeyman.org 



FILM 

ENTRY 

DEADLINE: 

THURSDAY, 

FEBRUARY 

15, 1996 



In Cash 

Prizes 

Awarded 

SCAti/OMPIl!: FUUSiltV. KG JK!Mn 






just happen. Sometimes you can be a good direc- 
tor and somehow every choice you make is the 
wrong one," he says. "I felt better; [Dollhouse] 
made me feel I have something to share with other 
people, something to communicate" — about kids' 
ability to endure and to "exhume tenderness from 
this horrible cruel world. That's why [the main 
character, Dawn Weiner] doesn't slit her wrists." 
He adds, "It's a bleak picture, but it's funny at the 
same time." 

Six years older and wiser, with a long stint out- 
side the dream-machine industry teaching English 
to Russian immigrants, Solondz now says to film- 
school greenhorns, "My advice is to write a script 
you love. If it's a script that other people love and 
it's the right people, that's a wonderful situation to 
be in." 

Dollhouse does seem close to the director's 
heart, even though its lead is a girl. "I identified 
with many of my characters," admits Solondz, 
whose small physique and substantial glasses lead 
one to suspect a hidden history of geekhood that 
allies him with the main character, as well as with 
her brother, a young Bill Gates look-alike who 
plays clarinet in his garage band. 



Though it's a truism to "write about what 
you know," many of the strongest films — and 
other films' strongest moments — seem the 
result of some autobiographical touchstone. 
The abusive power dynamic between friends in 
sleepover, for instance, was based on a charming 
trouble-maker Sullivan knew growing up. "It's a 
big issue now, with teen-pack mentality," says 
Sullivan. "The hierarchy is run by the strongest 
in teen society, especially with fathers absent. 
At 17, I didn't know how to stand up to bullies 
or tyranny." 

But it's not only first films that benefit from 
an autobiographical link. Even To Die For was 
enriched by Van Sant's personal ties to ele- 
ments in the story, though on the surface it 
seems far removed from the director's experi- 
ence. To Die For tells the story of a dim but 
ambitious weatherwoman (Nicole Kidman) 
who seduces some high school students into 
bumping off" her husband (Matt Dillon) when 
he becomes inconvenient to her career. Written 
by Buck Henry from a novel by Joyce Maynard, 
which in turn draws from the real-life trial of a 
school teacher in New Hampshire, the story is 



30 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 




thrice removed from the Oregonian director. 
But Van Sant was attracted to the project 
because of similarities he saw between Darien, 
Connnecticut, where he spent 10 years of his 
youth, and the New Hampshire setting of To 
Die For. Both are former railroad towns on the 
New England coast with a similar class struc- 
ture — lower-class fishermen; middle-class 
Italians, who first arrived in the 1800s to build 
the railroads; and upper-class vacationers (now 
commuters). "Everyone went to school togeth- 
er and we all became close friends," Van Sant 
recalls, "yet there was always this humorously 
designed class structure." The pride and preju- 
dice of class is fully played out in Van Sant's 
rendering of the script; interestingly, it's the 
white-trash high schoolers who come off as the 
most sympathetic and least cartoonish. Van 
Saill agrees: "The kids were cast that way." 

There's also a hidden autobiographical link 
in Heavy, an accomplished first feature by 
James Mangold (who's now shooting a cop story 
set in New Jersey, under Miramax'^ wing). Set 
in upstate New York, where the 30-year-old 
director grew up, this restrained film follows an 



overweight, painfully shy pizza-maker through a 
personal tragedy and a first crush. "I was driven to 
make a movie about someone who was very big, 
but very unseen," Mangold explains. "Fat is a kind 
of ugliness that we're blamed for. It's a dramatical- 
ly potent place to be." 

And it's an experience the director admits 
knowing firsthand. "There was a period after I was 
under contract at Disney, when I was 21, a period 
after things kind of fell apart for a very early 
chance at having a very momentous career," 
Mangold recalls. "I gained a lot of weight and very 
much kept to myself. I suddenly was confronted 
with how visible I could be when this deal was 
made, and I had a big agent and was signed with 
the hottest studio — then how suddenly I could be 
completely invisible." He goes on, "There's just 
this feeling of transparency you have. When peo- 
ple do see you, they essentially see you as a target." 

Like Solondz, Mangold's stint with the studio 
system left him with a more sober view of the 
value of being "discovered" by Hollywood fresh 
out of school. "It's a myth, this whole idea that 
through a short film you can get a dream career 
out of Hollywood," he cautions. "You really have 
to come in stronger, with more momentum. And 
that entails — at least in the current set-up — mak- 
ing an independent feature that makes an impres- 
sion. Because they need to treat you with some 
respect. Essentially, if you've made a short film, 
they're giving you a monumental break, and they 
feel like they own you." 

Van Sant is a director who came to the studios 
more slowly, and on his own terms. By the time he 
made his first studio project, he already had Mala 
Noche ($20,000), Drugstore Cowboy ($4 million), 
and Even Cowgirls Get the Blues ($7.5 million) 
under his belt. So in his experience, the difference 
between making a studio film, like the $15 million 
To Die For, and shooting independently is negligi- 
ble/ except for the marketing clout a studio can 
muster. 

"I always throw it to a committee anyway," he 
says. "So far it hasn't been different from when it's 
a low-budget film I'm showing to my friends in 
Oregon. It's been actually harsher, because they're 
your friends. Here you are making a film with 
money you've saved for two years, and your 
friends, who are supposed to be sympathetic, are 
gossiping about your movie behind your back and 
telling each other, 'It doesn't work.' That's hard. 
The same thing happens when you've worked for 
a year-and-a-half — and got paid for it, however — 
at a small studio." 

But somehow, like the Everready bunny, these 
directors have found a way to keep going and 
going. It's a calling they've gotta really love. 

Patricia Thomson is editor o) The Independent. 



23rd 
Athens 

International 

Film& 

Video 

Festival 



Athens 

Intensive 

Media 

Workshops 



April 26 - 
May 3,1996 



Deadline for 

Entries: 

January 12, 1996 



telephone: 

614-593-1330 
fax: 

614-593-1328 
e-mail: 

rbradley@ohiou.edu 
write: 

Athens Center 
for Film & Video 
P.O. Box 388 
Athens, OH 
45701 



January/February 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 31 





FiGld 
Reports 




by James Shelton 



In October 1994, Mikhaila "Max" Adams 
attended the Austin Heart of Film Festival and 
Screenwriters' Conference with the same aspi- 
ration as so many others: to secure a deal. A 
former bartender and secretary, Adams man- 
aged to "do lunch" with producer David Valdes 
(A Perfect World, In the Line of Fire, and 
Unforgiven). Later while at a party, she was 
introduced to Barry Josephson, president of 
production for Columbia Pictures. Valdes and 
Josephson read Adams' script en route to Los 
Angeles and informed her upon their arrival 
home that she now had an agent and a pro- 
ducer. 

Excess Baggage is presently being rewritten 
by Adams, who has since moved from Utah to 
Los Angeles. The film, produced by Valdes, 
began shooting in November with star Alicia 
Silverstone. 

Adams's Cinderella story became the key 
inspiration for more than 300 participants at 
the second annual festival and conference, 
held from October 5 to 8. According to festival 
directors Barbara Morgan and Marsha Milam, 
the event is designed to fill a niche in the 
American film industry. "Our focus remains 
the contribution of the screenwriter to 
filmmaking.. .an integral element in the cre- 
ative process that we both celebrate and exam- 
ine," the directors explained in their welcom- 
ing letter to festival attendees. "Our aim is to 
bring acknowledged masters of the craft of 
writing, along with a variety of entertainment 
professionals, together with the emerging 
screenwriting talent that continually reener- 
gizes the film and television industry." 

In a swirl of panel discussions, seminars, 
"how-to" craft sessions, case studies, and one- 
on-one mentor programs, 100 industry profes- 
sionals along with more than 300 registrants 
converged on Austin's historic Driskill Hotel to 
share their expertise. But the imparting of 



Write'em, Cowboy 

Austin Heart / 

of Film Festival and 
Screenwriters' CZ^orxfe: 




knowledge came in a greater variety of forms, 
the most vital being the networking parties, 
which cultivated an informal atmosphere of 
mutual exchange between registrants and pro- 
fessionals. 

Tara Veneruso, who won a Silver Award at 
the Houston International Film Festival for her 
music documentary ]anis Joplin Slept Here, felt 
the festival "connected screenwriters and film- 
makers with real professionals. These weren't 
professors from some college, they make their 
careers in film, and it was magic." 

Many of these professionals suggested that 
the key to success is network-building in gen- 
eral and having access to a community of like- 



minded individuals. "Sometimes you find 
yourself getting bogged down and drifting," 
said Al Reinert (Apollo 13), "and you need 
feedback in order to get grounded again." 

Independent writer/director Steve Bilich 
(Ruta Wakenings) said, "There are a lot of 
people who just don't want to live in 
Hollywood, but they want to make movies. 
Connect with people in your area who have 
the same common goals, and you can see pas- 
sions increasing. Not to mention, these peo- 
ple can be a foundation for actually getting 
your film made." 

Writers got down to brass tacks during the 
various craft sessions that explored screen- 



32 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



writing on several different levels, from basic 
story structure and text formatting to the 
complexity of pacing in action and mystery 
films. There were a couple of case study ses- 
sions that involved the creators of two tele- 
vision series looking at their work: Fox's 
alternative animated hit The Tick by Ben 
Edlund and the Emmy-nominated dramatic 
series Sweet justice by John Romano. 
Writer/producer Anne Flett-Giordano and 
actress Peri Gilpin (Roz) also discussed the 




Emmy-winning episode of Frasier titled "An 
Affair to Forget." 

Other panels were equally weighted 
toward commercial Hollywood scripts. 
Shane Black (Letlud Weapon, The Last Action 
Hero), tor instance, explained the impor- 
tance of placing a "Wham-O" in action 
scripts every 10 pages — a "Wham-O" being 
anything that causes a spike in the emotions 
of a viewer and keeps them riveted to the 
screen. 

Although most ot the panelists were 
Hollywood writers, they managed to discuss 
and even promote films made outside the 



mainstream. 

"Independent filmmaking is something spe- 
cial," said writer/director/actor Barry Primus 
(Mistress, Final Stage, and television's Tribeca 
and Nine to Five). Primus avowed a belief in fol- 
lowing a specific vision, even with the knowl- 
edge that the project will never be financed 
through the mainstream. There is "a certain 
glamour in being an outlaw" in filmmaking, he 
said, adding that the point is nonetheless to 
ensure that your project gets made. 

"Don't try to make a Hollywood movie," 
Primus advised. "Make something that hasn't 
been done before, something odd or strange, 
yet expressly in your own voice." 

"Ideas are the commodity," said 26-year-old 
writer Christopher McQuarrie (The Usual 
Suspects). "L.A. is a vacuum of ideas right now, 
and all you need to do is be able to tell an orig- 
inal story." 

Writer/director Frank Pierson (Cool Hand 
Luke, Dog Day Afternoon, and Presumed 
Innocent) recommended searching today's 
headlines for real-life people and fictionalizing 
to pursue a larger moral/ethical truth than is 
present in the facts. "Look for those events that 
are a metaphor for life," Pierson suggested. 
Then begin "paring those events down" into a 
tangible, character-driven storyline. Cable is 
becoming a fast-growing home for independent 
works, but they are specifically looking for films 
that fit the times, he added. 

Similar words of encouragement were heard 
during the other panels that dealt more broad- 
ly with producing a film independently. 

Significantly, the speakers came from diverse 
backgrounds; there was a former security guard 
(McQuarrie, who wrote The Usual Suspects), a 
comic book writer/artist (Ben Edlund), novelist 
Sarah Bird (Don't Tell Her It's Me), and former 
journalists Bill Wittligg (Legends of the Fall) and 
Robin Swicord (Little Women). What they had 
in common was their success in the industry. 
The group's knowledge and stories of personal 
struggle inspired all attendees. 

M. Cevin Cathell, associate producer of The 
Return of the Texas Chainsaw Massacre and 
Cadillac Ranch, told participants to "get cre- 
ative" when attempting to produce a film. 
"Going to parties and talking to the right peo- 
ple is so important," she said. "You would be 
surprised who might partially finance, donate 
services, or physically work on a project with 
you. I met a great director ot photography who 
was able to secure certain services — film stock, 
processing, and equipment — at a substantial 
savings by promising to use those same compa- 



DIRECTING 
WORKSHOP 

DIRECT YOUR OWN SHORT 

FILMS IN OUR HANDS-ON 

INTENSIVE EIGHT WEEK 

TOTAL IMMERSION 

WORKSHOPS FOR 

INDIVIDUALS WITH NO PRIOR 

FILMMAKING EXPERIENCE. 

LEARN CONCEPTS OF STORY, 

DIRECTING, CAMERA, SOUND 

AND EDITING IN A COURSE 

DESIGNED & TAUGHT BY 

AWARD- WPWNING INSTRUCTORS. 

TUITION $4,000 

ANIMATION WORKSHOP 

■ Classic Oxberry Animation ■ 

■ Silicon Graphics 3-D • 

Computer Animation 

Eight Week Intensive 

Students will animate their work on 
the Oxberry Animation Camera, the 
professional standard for classic 
animated films from Walt Disney's 
Snow White and Fantasia to Bugs 
Bunny and Daffy Duck. Those who 
choose to include computer animation in 
their films will work with the Silicon 
Graphics computer work station with 
state of the art 2-D and 3-D software, 
the industry standard for major motion 
picture effects used in THE MASK, 
JURASSIC PARK, THE SHADOW, and 
WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT?, and 
countless television commercials. 

Students will also learn concepts 
of story writing, directing, 
cinematography, and editing as they 
apply to animation. Applicants should 
be prepared for a full time commitment 
to transforming their ideas into 
animated films. Start date is January 8. 
Space is limited. Tuition is $5,500. 



NEW YORK FILM ACADEMY 

100 EAST 17TH STREET NYC 10003 
TEL:- 212-674-4300 FAX: 212-477-1414 



January/February 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 33 




212.343-1850 

We now offer affordable Avid off-line 
editing in a private and comfortable 
atomosphere in soho. 

OPEN CITY FILMS, INC. 
198 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10013 



one-on-one Avid training available 
36 gigabytes of storage 
garden 



Bonjour! Monsieur Thomas Edison at your service. 

Death has not slowed me down. I've recently discovered 

that Hots Shots Cool Cuts has the most fantastique 

International location footage. From Tokyo to Timbuktu 

over 100 hrs. of landmarks, aerials, cityscapes, & culture. 

Around zee world, they've got it all. I heartily recommend 

Hot Shots Cool Cuts for all your international footage needs. 

Vive la stock cinematique internationale!!! 



HOT SHOTS 

PHONE: (212)799-9100 
FAX: (212) 799-9258 

The stock footage company whose stock footage doesn't look like stock footage 




nies on his next film," Cathell added. 

Writer/director Whit Stillman (Metro- 
politan and Barcelona) emphasized to aspiring 
filmmakers the importance of setting up a cor- 
poration, which limits personal liability. 
According to Stillman, the odds are 500-to- 
one that a film with a budget of $25,000 will 
return a profit. "If you are unsure about how to 
go about [incorporating], just borrow docu- 
ments from an existing business and substitute 
the names with those involved in your enter- 
prise," Stillman said. He also examined the 
special Screen Actors Guild (SAG) provisions 
for low-budget experimental films. 

Primus also recommended that filmmakers 
shoot five or six scenes on video first. This 
run-through can be used to fine-tune dialogue 
and action, and can also serve as a valuable 
"calling card" to possible investors interested 
in financing your project. 

Though only two years old, the conference 
has already tapped a deep well of aspiring 
screenwriters. Over 1,600 screenplays were 
received in this year's competition. The win- 
ners were divided into three categories: 
Children and Family (White Water by Jonathan 
Eig), Adult (Double Time by Polly Keny 
McAllister) and Student Short (Bing Yao's 
Twinkle Twinkle) . Winners of the Children and 
Adult categories each received $3,000 cash 
awards, while the Student Short screenplay 
netted $750. 

The festival also received 140 film entries 
for Best Short Film (Sean Gannon's 
Radioman), Best Guerilla Feature Film pro- 
duced for less than $50,000 (Seeking the Cafe 
Bob by Jeff Stolhand), and Best Feature Film 
for more than $50,000 (The Man with the 
Perfect Swing by Michael Hovis) . Each winner 
received a bronze award. 

Appropriately, Mikhaila Adams's good for- 
tune seems to have been perpetuated: festival 
staff confirmed that at least five screenplays 
from the competition were being optioned and 
are currently in negotiations. 

For information on next year's festival and 
conference, contact: Barbara Morgan, Austin 
Heart of Film Festival & Screenwriters' Con- 
ference, 707 Rio Grande, Ste. 101, Austin, TX 
78701; (800) 310-FEST; (512) 478-4795; fax: 
478-6205. 

James Shelton is an Austin-based writer and photogra- 
pher and the president of TEX-CINEMA Productions. 



34 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 




4 File Edit Bin Clip Timeline Output Special Tools Windows 




Castleway Entertainment 

We Want Your Concepts To Become Reality 

A ONE-STOP PRODUCTION CENTER, WE CAN HELP TO KEEP YOU WITHIN 
BUDGET BY KEEPING DOWN UNFORESEEN EXPENSES CAUSED BY HAVING 
A CONFUSION OF CONTRACTORS AND SUPPLIERS. 

• Total equipment availability 

• Seasoned, open-minded staff 

• Flexible pricing packages 

342 Marietta Street • Suite 6 • Atlanta Georgia • 30313 • (404)523-2302 • FAX(404) 523-0048 



wir) » 

A _ AVID t 


p 


rail 


ft 



AVID Av; 

VHS and 3/4" off-line 
editing also available 

947-8433 

(low rates) 

David Royle Productions 
330 West 42nd Street 
New York, NY 10036 




"Scriptware is the best!",, 

JL Screenplay 



The pro's choice! 

Professional script writers demand two things: 
They need to get their ideas onto the page 
easily and quickly-anything between your 
brainstorm and the paper kills your creativity. 
And they need their scripts in the proper for- 
mat-if it doesn't look right, your script ends up 
in some secretary's trash can instead of in your 
producer's eager hands! 

With Scriptware. your story Hies onto the 
page. And the Formatting that Hollywood 
expects happens instantly and automatically! 
All you need are your pinkies and the Tab and 
Enter keys to create a perfectly formatted script. 
It's easier than a typewriter! Type character 
names and scene headings with just one key- 
stroke. Scriptware does all the margin changes, 
spacing changes, capitalizing and page breaking 
for you! Make changes on page one and 
Scriptware makes sure the rest of your script is 
still just right. You just write-Scriptware keeps 
your script ready to print, submit and sell! 



Get exactly what you need! 

Scriptware Lite or Scriptware Pro. Both are 
full-featured word processors that get your 
story on the page and your name on the screen. 
Lite comes in two different versions-Film for 
movies and filmed TV shows (e.g. 1-hour dra- 
mas), and Sitcom for taped TV shows. Lite 
includes a 100,000+ word dictionary and it lets 
you import scripts you've already written. Pro 
lets you write in every format there is and lets 
you modify and create new formats, too. It also 
has a 1 20,000+ word thesaurus, revision han- 
dling. Notes and Outline features, instant Title 
Page creation, and other powerful writer's tools. 

■ 'I 




Rave Reviews! 

Scriptware is the software of choice at studios 
and production companies. Just listen to 
what the pros say about Scriptware: 

Scriptware is in a class by itself. The 

easiest to master. Others hardly compare'.' 

Tracy Clark 
The New York Screenwriter 4 95 

Simply the best there is. Just add words!' 

Larry Hertzog 

Nowhere Man,SeaQuest 

Nothing approaches it in ease of use!' 

Peter Coyote 
WriterlActor 

The best tool for scriptwriting, period'' 

Hv Bender 



Essential Software /or Writers 




Sinprwiire'i h\l\ Id \mi npt- nana wt//i ju\t tine hjStfokti '\ml tilth 
5( nphuire. kIuii you iee n h/w/ \oii ffli Si nplware */jch \ you ruji ll\ 
m lull \iwr m npt mi// lixii lilt when you pnnl il-pni;e hrml\. heikter\. 
foOUTt, PttisOU nhirL\. ASli ptlfci unit mure' Pull ittntn menm tinjion- 
te\t\enuti\e twlp mule using Stnptvmre's ptmerful/eiiiiire\ a hiee:e' 



The price is right! 

Order today and get Scriptware for a special 
price! Or try our demo for FREE [nomallj 
19.95). Experience Scriptware ami the freedom to 
create for as little as $129.95 with a 30-daj 
money-back guarantee!. To order, or lor more 
info. CALL TOLL-FREE 800-788-7090! 

Scnptwan-fTqwrr*: ]'«'• IHM a-mp«lih*r<ii«ijwtrt • K K \M • 

lXtS»m»>i; I ■« h.rtwt • 1 HD'V<vv Anrnl I futd *<%<■ ■ MoM .^«.«ui 
Cl'«M n*M*n \rx 1*«<i*O.M 5M Ha Da ' H\ »-*N2 



January/February 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 35 




On the Short Form 

Four Distributors TTalce Stock of 
tine Market for Shorts 



by Max J. Alvarez 

In spite of tremendous exhibitor apathy 
towards short films, thousands are produced in 
the United States every year by students and 
independents. Few if any of these ever see the 
light of a multiplex theater screen, though 
many will serve as filler programming at film 
festivals. Festivals, of course, tend not to pay 
for accepted submissions and in fact generally 
require registration fees from filmmakers. They 
also are designed to showcase feature-length 
films, a factor that prompted the establishment 
of prominent international festivals dedicated 
exclusively to the presentation of short films. 
Since the market for shorts exists primarily in 
television — and European television at that — 
some of the best entry points are the shorts fes- 
tivals in Europe, most notably Clermont- 
Ferrand in France (February 2-10, 1996); 
Tampere in Finland (March 6-10); and 
Oberhausen in Germany (tentatively sched- 
uled for April-May) . In this country, Sundance 
reigns supreme [see story pg. 40], though few 
shorts are bought outright; most of the buyers 
and agents packing the short programs there 
are looking for talent to nurture, not acquisi- 
tions. Other prominent U.S. festivals for shorts 
are the Aspen Short Festival (February 22-25, 
1996) and the New York Expo of Short Film & 
Video (November 1996). 

Still, the market for shorts does not neces- 
sarily have to begin and end at the festival cir- 
cuit. While both major and independent the- 
atrical distributors avoid shorts like the plague, 
small boutique distributors and dedicated non- 
profit organizations (such as Filmmakers 
Cooperative and Women Make Movies) take 
shorts very seriously. 

The Independent spoke recently with sever- 
al leading shorts distributors for views on the 
complex and undependable business of mar- 
keting short film productions. Most agreed that 
the shorts market has seen better days, yet 
there were ample indications that this predom- 



inantly television and nontheatrical- driven 
market was far from dormant. Opinions dif- 
fered as to the intensity of interest from over- 
seas TV markets, but the majority described 
the level of enthusiasm as significantly higher 
than the lukewarm reception generally accord- 
ed short films by U.S. broadcasters. 

Picture Start 

1727 W Catalpa Avenue, Chicago, IL 60640; 
(312) 769-2489. 

"I'm waiting for the market to surprise me, and 
every now and then it does," says Picture Start 
owner Jeffrey S. Hellyer, who has run the com- 




pany since 1981. 

Founded in 1979 by the late Ron Epple 
and six other film enthusiasts from the 
University of Illinois, Picture Start historical- 
ly has acquired between 200 to 300 shorts a 
year. At present, however, Picture Start is 
putting the brakes on new acquisitions in 
order to concentrate on its backlog of 2,000 
titles. "We've got a thousand submissions sit- 
ting here from the past eight months alone," 
Hellyer reports. 

The Picture Start library encompasses a 
range of films in all genre categories: anima- 
tion films by Sally Cruikshank, experimental 
classics by Maya Deren and Ed Emshwiller, 
quirky cinema verite shorts by Tony Buba, 



J. T. Walsh (I.) and 
Billy Bob Thornton 
play two inmates in 
an institution for the 
criminally insane in 
George Hickenlooper's 
Some Folks Call It a 
Sling Blade, one of 
Picture Start's 2,000 
titles. 

Courtesy Picture 
Start 



Some shorts make it into 
people's homes via the 

Start packages. 

Courtesy Picture Start 




36 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



satires by Ernie Fossellus, as well as dramas 
and political documentaries. The company is 
generally in a fragile financial state and has 
survived these past 16 years due to its volun- 
teer staff having outside jobs. 

"In all these years things have only altered 
slightly," Hellyer says. "Short films are just as 
second-class as ever." Hellyer reports a down- 
ward trend in licensing fees for shorts 
because television networks, realizing that 
independent filmmakers crave exposure, try 
to pay as little as possible. A broadcast offer 
of $100 per minute is considered a terrific 
(albeit uncommon) deal in the United States 
nowadays. "To be fair to the networks, short 
films come out of nowhere from unheard-of 
people and then disappear," says Hellyer. 
"They are not part of an ongoing series. 
People don't turn on their TV sets or go to 
video stores for 10-minute movies." This has- 
n't stopped Picture Start from offering 90- 
minute video collections, such as an annual 
Best of the Fests and Nice Girls... films by and 
about Women (with works by Emily Hubley, 
Ann Marie Fleming, Lidia Szajko, and eight 
other filmmakers). 

Hellyer finds very little signs of life left in 
the theatrical market for short fiction works. 
Compilation programs of shorts that occa- 
sionally land bookings in art cinemas (e.g., 
those centered around animation or gayAes- 
bian themes, such as the International 
Tournee of Animation package or Strand 
Releasing's Boys' Life) are considered esoteric 
exceptions. 

"I don't think Americans respect the short 
form, but in Europe people realize that it is an 
art form in and of itself," states Hellyer. 
Television in the overseas industrialized 
countries tends not to be locked into the 
standard 30- and 60-minute programming 
blocks and is more open to experimentation 
with films of various lengths. England and 
Canada are shorts enthusiasts; countries 
such as France, Germany, and Spain also pur- 
sue them at overseas film festivals. The lan- 
guage barrier has not presented much of a 
problem for Picture Start, since the overseas 
market is accustomed to the subtitling and 
dubbing of American programs. 

In the States, the reception for the kinds 
of quirky shorts favored by Picture Start has 
been chillier. The television networks, for 
example, have not expanded their short sub- 
jects needs. "It's been 10 years since we've 
made a deal with Saturday Night Live, because 
they just don't take anything that isn't in- 




house anymore," says Hellyer. Picture Start 
generally submits a group of 20 shorts (usually 
those with conventional narratives) to a net- 
work as individual entries rather than as a 
package (unlike home video), because TV buy- 
ers prefer to assemble their own programs, and 
one poorly received film in a package could 
taint the remaining titles. 

Hellyer praises the new independent movie 
channels for taking an interest in short films. 
Even so, he doubts they will be paying much 
money and predicts filmmakers will be utilizing 
these channels primarily for resume exposure. 
While Edge TV will he taking a riskier 
approach by acquiring experimental shorts, 
Bravo and its Independent Film Channel off- 
spring are searching for non-experimental nar- 
ratives. 

Picture Start is not currently accepting sub- 
missions. On a more positive note, the compa- 
ny is making its Avid postproduction editing 
system available to independent filmmakers 
without distribution strings attached and for 
wli.it Hellyer asserts are "ungodly low rates." 



Coe Film Associates, Inc. 

65 E. 96th Street, New York, NY 10128; (212) 
831-5355. 

A forerunner in the selling of short films to tele- 
vision since 1970, Coe Film Associates is the 
largest U.S. distributor of shorts to the TV mar- 
ket and boasts a library of some 2,500 titles, 
including TV specials, series, and performance 
films. Founder Bernice Coe estimates that her 
company screens 50 to 75 direct submissions 
each week, most of which are rejected. The 
company specializes in family and children's 
programming and periodically releases dramat- 
ic stories and documentaries. Coe's suppliers 
include the American Film Institute, 
Anthology Film Archives, the Australian and 
New Zealand film commissions, and the 
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Although 
Coe concedes the market tor short product is 
not as strong as it once was, her company has 
nonetheless managed to turn a profit. "The rea- 
son we make money is that we handle SO many 
films, and the reason the filmmaker doesn'l 
make much money is hecause he has just one 
film," says Coe. 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 37 



The premiere distribution 
cooperative for social 
issue media 

NEW DAY 
FILMS 

CELEBRATES 
" ^ YEARS 

of challenging 
social issue documentaries 
produced by our membership. 



New Days Films is now accepting 
applications for new membership. 

Call 914.485.8489 




Coe cites narrative fiction shorts, particular- 
ly those produced in film schools as audition 
projects, as being the toughest to market to 
television. Nonfiction works, on the other 
hand, offer greater possibilities, and in extreme- 
ly rare circumstances a dance performance film 
such as David Hahn's In a Rehearsal Room will 
be profitable for its filmmaker. Coe Film 
Associates enjoys relationships with cable 
giants Home Box Office and Discovery 
Channel and has sold packages of 50 to 100 
shorts to such services as Nickelodeon. The dis- 
tributor also has a representative assigned to 
handle sales to PBS and other specialty venues. 

Coe routinely sends agents to various 
European film markets in search of internation- 
al customers for short product. England has 
proven to be a viable market for Coe due to the 
Children's Channel, the BBC, and Channel 
Four, but in her experience, non-English-speak- 
ing countries are more apprehensive about 
English-language shorts unless the casts have 
recognizable names. 

Coe Films Associates accepts direct submis- 
sions from filmmakers. 



Cinema Guild 

1697 Broadway, Suite 50G, New York, NY 
10019; (212) 246-5522. 



"Don't quit your day job. It's virtually unheard 
of for anyone to make a living from the income 
you'll be able to generate from an educational 
film or video program," warns Cinema Guild 
president Gary Crowdus. 

Cinema Guild is celebrating its twentieth 
year as an independent distributor of documen- 
tary and how-to videos in the nontheatrical and 
home video markets. Cinema Guild occasional- 
ly handles features, but its focus is primarily on 



short productions. Each year the distributor 
acquires 30 to 40 documentary shorts and a 
maximum of six fiction shorts. Docu- 
mentaries are easier for Cinema Guild to 
market if the film can be targeted to univer- 
sity courses (e.g., ethnic or media studies 
departments). Short films based on literary 
classics periodically find a warm reception in 
language arts and English Lit courses at some 
universities. In addition, says Crowdus, "We 
have a package of short fiction pieces we call 
Short Stories, a video anthology which has 
gone to libraries and public schools. 

"As long as there's an academic commu- 
nity, it's a fairly stable market," he observes. 
While this market produces some nice royal- 
ty checks on occasion, Crowdus is quick to 
note that the revenue generated is seldom 
enough to support a filmmaker. 

Like Coe, Crowdus has doubts about the 
market value of film school "calling card" 
shorts, especially in home video. "If you're 
lucky you might do the occasional TV sale. If 
they're very short — 10 minutes or less — 
there is a market for what they call intersti- 
tial material." 

Filmmakers may pitch Crowdus directly 
over the phone. 

Pyramid Film & Video 

Box 1048, Santa Monica, CA 90406; (310) 
828-7577. 

The diminishing market and increased com- 
petition for fictional short product has 
prompted Pyramid to shift its focus to 
health-related acquisitions and productions, 
reports vice president Denise Adams. The 
company acquires 15 to 20 shorts a year and 
has a library of 500 titles, the majority of 




38 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 




which are 30 minutes and under. 

Pyramid did distribute Joan Gratz's 1992 
Oscar-winning short Mona Lisa Descending a 
Staircase, although this acquisition was large- 
ly an exception. Public libraries, once a 
dependable source of income for Pyramid's 
short product, have transformed themselves 
into mini-video stores with more conven- 
tional feature-length titles. "They don't buy 
anything unless it's under fifty dollars," 
laments Adams. 

"The international market is suffering, 
too. They, more than America, have a pres- 
sure for low cost," Adams continues. She 
also echoes Coe's comments about narrative 
shorts encountering translation problems. 
Cable television, which purchased a high 
volume of Pyramid shorts in the early eight- 
ies, now produces many of its own shorts and 
interstitials. 

Submissions to Pyramid may be sent to 
the attention of Pat Hamada, director of 
acquisitions. 

Tapestry International 

920 Broadway, New York, NY 10010; (212) 
505-2288. 

"I think, unfortunately, it's getting worse, not 
better," Tapestry president Nancy Walzog 
says of the shorts market. 

Tapestry has been in business since 1987 
and acquires approximately 10 to 12 shorts 
per year, mostly in the 30-minute range with 
very few exceptions. Walzog asserts that 
broadcasters offer "not more than a couple of 
thousand dollars tor shorts in general" and 
tend to favoi either extremely brief entries 
for interstitials or 30-minute programs. 
Tapestry has found that 12- to 18-minute 
films tend to be too long tor fillers and too 



brief for half-hour time slots. 

Tapestry recently marketed Claudia Silver's 
half-hour comedy Kalamazoo to a number of 
foreign territories, and its most successful short 
release to date has been Ted Demme and 
Gregory O'Connor's 22-minute drama The Bet. 

Interested parties may send VHS submis- 
sions to acquisitions staffer Anthony Latorella. 

HOW CAN THE SITUATION FOR SHORTS IN THE 
US improve? Picture Start's Jeff Hellyer makes 
a plea for shorts enthusiasts to support such 
films whenever they appear in theaters and on 
video store shelves, and to write fan letters to 
exhibitors and networks that program short 
works. HBO, for example, considers a major 
write-in campaign to consist only of three let- 
ters, and many public television stations regard 
a single telephone call as representing 1,000 
viewers. 

Film festivals offer no guarantees for ideal 
exposure. The British Short Film Festival (held 
the first week of September in London) report- 
edly scheduled 1 a.m. screenings for certain 
films; not surprisingly, attendance was sparse. 
On the other hand, the New York Expo of 
Short Film and Video goes out of its way to pro- 
vide opportunities for visiting filmmakers to 
meet Manhattan-based shorts distributors, 
hosting receptions and special screenings. 

Even as he stresses the importance of locat- 
ing a distributor to stand behind an indepen- 
dent short, Hellyer, like everyone else, cautions 
filmmakers against Utopian visions of break- 
even returns or profitability. "It's probably one 
film in a hundred that's really going to see a 
return." 

Max ). Alvarez is a freelance writer and independent 
filmmaker based in Belhesda, Maryland 




tyjf*^ 



presents. 



The source for all of your 
pre-production software 

800-9-SHEBANG 






rat 



table. 



can 



Everything!! 

From 

Storyforming 

to 

Actualizing 



1&& 7V6ale S6e&x*t$ is the East Coast dealer for 
Movie Magic, Storyboard Quick/Artist, 
screenwriting software, many more, all at 
UNBEATABLE PRICES. Call for our free catalog. 



email: info@shebang.com fax: 201-963-8563 
web site: http://www.shebang.com 



FEATURES 

COMMERCIALS 

TRAILERS 



' 



jjPF 



XURM 

HfTO 



C7 



isi 




DOable! 



35 mm & 16mm 

- 

ARR! BL IMII "NAGRA STC 
Grip/Electric Expendables 
Editorial Crew Locations 

DOable Films 

A Full Pioduction Company 
363 5th Ave. Suite #102 

San Diego, CA92101 
619.696.9007 



January/February 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 39 



.-"''" 





Field 

Reports 



\ 



/ 




Shorts Stories 
FROM SUNDANCE 



by Dana Harris 

Short films are festival standbys that 
rarely contain "market value." However, if 
there's any festival that could turn five minutes 
of 16mm film into gold, it's Sundance. 
Filmmakers who win a slot at the Big Kahuna 
of the American festival circuit may well 
expect more than just the bliss of finding an 
audience. Forget the feather in your cap — 
what about a three -picture deal in your back 
pocket? 

Ask a dozen filmmakers whose short films 
appeared at the 1995 Sundance Film Festival, 
and you'll get a half-dozen different answers. 
Everyone says it's a great place to meet people; 
some made valuable connections. Some film- 
makers found distributors, and others liked the 
free pair of jeans (courtesy of The Gap, the 
shorts program's sponsor), but there's a distinct 
absence of fame, fortune, or even one -picture 
deals. 



Reality check 

Sundance offers something valuable to any 
filmmaker: high-quality exposure. Shorts are 
screened three or four times to an audience 
hungry for new talent, and for some this oppor- 
tunity alone is enough. 

"I got a great response," says James Spione, 
the writer-director of Garden. "I met filmmak- 
ers and other people in the business. I set up a 
screening in L.A., had interest from TV pro- 
ducers, and I'm now negotiating making a 
short film for pay-per-view." 

Still, Spione says he can't attribute all his 
good fortune to Sundance. "I have an agent, 
and this made it easier for her. It helped that I 
had a second film there that I produced 
(Parallel Sons). That gave me higher visibility, 
and I was able to exploit that a little bit to 
cross-promote my work. Still, it's hard to gauge 
how much discussion Sundance can create 



about your work." 

Keith Thomson, who directed Cupidity, says 
his short's screening led to a production com- 
pany hiring him to shoot a feature. Dan Doyle's 
Burning Love was picked up by Good Machine, 
and filmmaker Terracino said that after Ira 
Deutchman's new production company saw 
M} Polish Waiter at Sundance, they asked him 
to do another short. 

However, as Doyle describes his experience, 
"I'm no richer. I met a lot of people and hooked 
up with producers, but as to whether or not 
any of it works out, I have no idea." 

The Sundance 
seal of approval 

One of the most frequently mentioned benefits 
is the magic of your short being suddenly trans- 
formed into A Sundance Film. Sundance paves 
a film's way to other festivals (often free of the 
usual entry fees and forms) and gives hope that 
a tape sent will actually be a tape watched. 

"It gave me instant credibility, a calling 
card," says Spione. "I know they won't immedi- 
ately throw my tape on the shelf." 

This transformation from short to valuable 
property can be disconcerting. "It's like The 
Wizard of Oz," says Thomson. "Give the scare- 
crow a diploma, and he's smart. You can go to 
Hollywood with the Sundance sheepskin. 
That's the effect and appeal of the festival, 
besides the skiing and free food." 

Barbara Heller, director of Little Women in 
Transit, compares Sundance to "going to an Ivy 
League college. It gives your film a pedigree 
that a lot of people care about." 

That cachet is the ethereal byproduct of the 
very practical John Cooper. He's the program- 
mer behind Sundance's shorts (as well as the 
creator of the shorts program) and is ultimate- 
ly responsible for deciding which of the more 
than 1,000 short film submissions will make 
one of the 50-odd festival slots. Cooper says 



the festival becomes a clearinghouse for 
many of the same short films that feed agents 
and producers' slush piles — only it's Cooper's 
team doing the grunt work. 

"We don't look for films that are calling 
cards," says Cooper. "A good film is one that 
has vision and tells a good story in an inter- 
esting way. Not interesting as in 'that's nice' 
or sitcoms; it needs to have some vitality. 

"The short film program has proven to be 
a very effective way to find new talent," says 
Cooper. "It filters through the thousands." 

Why do you think they 
call them "shorts"? 

Despite the concentration of talent and 
Cooper's passion for short films (most oft- 
heard phrase: "Cooper is terrific"), filmmak- 
ers say that shorts struggle for attention at 
Sundance. Filmmakers with shorts must pay 
their own way to the festival, and some found 
the attention underwhelming. 

"You're the fly on the wall," says David 
Ewing, director of Performance Anxiety. "I 
don't think Sundance is the kingmaking 
opportunity for shorts as it is for features. 
There's no one festival that's a launching pad 
for short films. Sundance can do that for a 
feature, but you'll never see people dying to 
get tickets for a short." (However, Cooper 
notes that the shorts programs "continue to 
be one of the most popular" and that most of 
last year's shorts programs sold out.)' 

When Michael LaHaie came to 
Sundance, he wasn't seeking industry atten- 
tion for his short, Critizen. He'd already 
secured a distributor and saw the festival as a 
bonus for what began as his senior project at 
San Francisco State University. However, 
that didn't dispel his feeling that having a 
short granted only second-class citizenship. 

"I didn't look for agents; I wanted to see 
the community," says LaHaie. "I was at this 



40 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 




great festival, but it was hard to see a film. It's 
not Sundance's fault; it's just too big. It did- 
n't feel like a true independent festival — 
more like a stepping-stone festival. It 
Sundance was a cool family's get-together, 
then I was at the kid's table. 

"After I got over that," he adds, "I had 
more tun." 

While Heller tound Sundance more hos- 
pitable, she also was startled to see that fea- 
tures definitely took the front seat. "Friend- 



told me that shorts aren't uppermost in people's 
minds, but I somehow couldn't believe it, 
because it was so important to me. They were 
right. It was kind of a rude awakening, bur the 
film was very well received. Cooper really takes 
care ot the short filmmakers. He's very accessi- 
ble, you're well-treated, and you have the same 
privileges as feature filmmakers. But it's a lot 
like high school. Everyone's trying to figure out 

who's cool." 

One filmmaker tound a high-school familiar 



solution. Says Mike Mitchell, director ot 
Chunks of Life, "We became very popular 
because we had transportation." 



The aftermath 

Most ot the filmmakers interviewed have sold 

or found distributors tor their tilms. Thomson, 
who had a number ot interested distributors, 
was able to recoup his (.osts bv selling Cupidity 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 41 



VIDEO POST PRODUCTION 



GteQiiDtt 



I D 



BETACAM SP Editing & 
A/B from Hi8 or 3/4 SP 

CALL FOR LOW RATE 



3/4" A/B Roll Editing still 

$45.00/hr with editor 

Addresstrack or audio TC 

Digital Effects, Switcher, GPI, 

Hi Res, Character Generator & 

VIDEO TOASTER 4000 

Animation, 2D & 3D Graphics 



SunRize STUDIO 16 
16 bit Digital Audio Editing 



TC striping, Windowdubs, Copies 

Transfers from HI8 & S-VHS, Dubs 

Studio & Location shoots 



Tel: 212 219-9240 
Fax: 212 966-5618 



NEW YORK 

INTERNATIONAL 

INDEPENDENT 

FILM & VIDEO 

FESTIVAL 



Producers, Managers, Agents, 

Distributors, and Financiers are invited, 

plus Press, Critics, 

and of course, NYC audiences. 



CALL 212.777.7100 

M - F 2pm - 6pm 

Eastern Standard Time 

for applications 



Features, Shorts, Animation, 

Documentaries, 35, 16, Video, 

Multi - Media 



From Michael LeHaie's Critizen, 
which came to Sundance '95 with 
distribution already secured. 
Nonetheless, the filmmaker felt the 
festival's pecking order: "If Sundance 
was a cool family's get together, then 
I was at the kid's table." 
Courtesy filmmaker 




to European TV stations. Spione's Garden got 
an offer from Bravo, and Terracino's M31 Polish 
Waiter will be handled by Lakeshore Pictures. 

However, to further dispel fantasies that 
Sundance has the Midas touch, many filmmak- 
ers had deals before they came to Sundance, 
and those who earned them afterward give 
Sundance only partial credit. 

For example, David Koepp, director of 
Suspicious, has just finished shooting an $8.7 
million picture for Universal from his own 
script — but he'd already written several scripts 
for the studio prior to going to Sundance with 
his short, and he is one of the writers on the 
new Tom Cruise vehicle, Mission Impossible. 

Still, Koepp says Suspicious was key to closing 
the deal on his own film. "The short definitely 
played into being able to do this. Doing a short 
film means a lot to a studio, because it shows 
you're entrepreneurial, rather than stepping 
into existing entities like sitcoms." 

Heller had signed her short with producers' 
representatives In Pictures pre-Sundance, 
which subsequently sold Little Women in Transit 
to Bravo/Independent Feature Channel and to 
Channel Four in England. Yet when it comes to 
the feature she's currently co-writing, she 
expects to go out and raise the funding herself. 

"At Sundance, people wanted to know what 



my plans were, did I have a script, please 
send it, and some of them [said] keep in 
touch," says Heller. "But I know people who 
waited 'in development' for four years. I want 
to skip the waiting around. No one's going to 
give you a project to direct unless you create 
it yourself." 

Sundance do's and don'ts 

None of these filmmakers saw being selected 
for Sundance as a passport to Nirvana (or 
Hollywood) , but all of them saw that there 
were rules of the road — and some regretted 
not following them. 

• You are the pursuer, not the pursued. "It's 
99 percent pursuit," says Thomson, a first- 
time filmmaker. Spione, who won a student 
Academy Award for his first short eight years 
ago, agrees. 

"The first one went to my head too 
much," says Spione. "My biggest mistake was 
thinking, 'It's going to do something for me.' 
It's not going to. Drawing attention to the 
film is my responsibility." 

Ewing, whose film won the Critics Week 
award at Cannes, suffered a similar pride - 
before-fall at Sundance. "I got a little big for 



42 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



my britches," he admits. 
"After Sundance I made 
the classic mistakes. I did- 
n't think it played as well 
on cassette as on a big 
screen, so I called agents 
and set up screenings 
instead of sending out 
cassettes. They don't have 
time to come to screen- 
ings." 

• If you want to shoot a fea- 
ture, have a script under 
your arm. "People are 
much more accessible at 
Sundance than in their 
daily lives," says Ewing. 
"You've got to show some- 
thing when people are 
receptive. You can win all 
the festivals in the world, 
but without another pro- 
ject there's not much they 
can do for you." 
Ewing adds that time is of 
the essence. "People's 
attention spans are limit- 
ed, and the excitement of 
seeing something you 
really like wears off. I was approached by an 
established producer who 'had' to have me 
direct, and two weeks later he wouldn't return 
my phone calls." 

• Have your own network. While Sundance !• 
offers more players per square inch than any 
other festival, it only lasts 10 days. All the 
power in the world does no good without the 
talent and support to harness it. 

"It depends on what level you're at," says 
Spione. "I was ready for something that good to 
happen. I was in control of my craft, I was at a 
point where I had the resources to follow up, 
and I already had an agent. What I needed was 
to get my foot in the door. I kept asking myself, 
'How am I going to make this work for me? 
How am I going to use this?' " 

• Send Sundance your film. Nothing eke. 
When your short gets to the Sundance office, it 
must go it alone. "Phone calls, faxes, articles— 
I don't look into them," says Cooper. "I have 
select people whose opinions I respect, and 
they only call it they've seen something they 
really like. When it gets down to it, it's the 
film." 

Dana Harris is a freelance film journalist and a film- 
maker in Nurwalk. CT 



AVID RENTAL 212.463.7830 




41 Union s q uare west suite 1228 NYC 1 0011 



msassmimmmmBi 



Show off your shorts with Prime Time. 

Right now, Prime Time Productions are after short films for a programme to be 
screened on Australian commercial television. 

The films should be from 10 seconds to 7 minutes in length. They can be funny, 
they can be animated, but above all, they must be entertaining and accessible to a 
mainstream audience. 

If your short film is chosen for the programme, you will be contacted for approval, 
clearance and to negotiate a fee. 

Naturally, you will receive full on-screen credit for your contribution. 

Ultimately, the aim of the programme is to show off the creative excellence of 
short film makers from around the world. 

And that could include you. ^ '°^ 



Please send your submission for 
preview on VHS cassette to: 

Prime Time Productions. 

Third Floor. 

627 Chapel St. 

South Yarra, Victoria 3141 

Australia 



Further enquiries to Matt Preston or Paul Harrington. 
Tel 613 9827 9855, Fax 613 9827 9655 



PRIME 
TTM!= 



Di 9jr 



FILM SOUND 



sound design, editing, and SFX 
Foley, ADR, and voice-over 
recording 



original music and scoring 
library music selection 
and licensing 



• competitive rates 



Dig IT i 



^ 



mm Mi 



4 NYC 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 43 




TIANANMEN: 




by J erry White 



Critics Clamor at 

The Gate of 

Heavenly Peace 

Carma Hinton and Richard Gordon have spent the bet- 
ter part of their careers documenting life in modern China, so 
it was inevitable that they turn their attention to the student 
democracy movement and Tiananmen Square massacre in June 
1989. The result is The Gate of Heavenly Peace, a scrupulously 
researched investigation of the bloody standoff between stu- 
dents and government officials. Unlike the news reportage of 
the day, the three -hour documentary digs deep, revealing 
where the movement's roots lie: we're shown the history of pre- 
vious student movements in China, the government's fickle shifts in policy towards political reform, and the catalytic impact of reformer Hu Yaobang's 
funeral. And unlike more recent documentaries, The Gate of Heavenly Peace takes great pains to tease out the various strands on both sides, reveal- 
ing the internal factions within the government and student leadership in a way that vastly complicates and more accurately reflects the course of 
events. 

Proof of the film's evenhandedness has come in the form of denunciations both from leaders within the pro-democracy student movement and 
from the Chinese government. But the controversy that surrounded it for so many months — culminating in China's retaliation by blocking director 
Zhang Yimou from attending the New York Film Festival — should not overshadow the value of Hinton and Gordon's research. Their work has made 
available an entirely new body of primary material on the student uprising — including extensive interviews, Chinese government newscasts, home 
videos, and music videos — all of which bring to life facets of the event that few in the West had bothered to consider. 

Carma Hinton occupies an unusual place as a cultural intermediary between East and West, having been born in China to American parents 
(Chinese is her first language) and living there until age 21, when she moved to the United States to attend the University of Pennsylvania. Her 
father, William Hinton, is a prominent China scholar, and before starting a filmmaking career she accompanied him on his visits to Long Bow, a rural 
village that served as the microcosm through which he examined China's land reform in his books Fanshen and Shenfan. Carma Hinton would later 
return to Long Bow as a filmmaker, where she and husband Richard Gordon made all their films prior to The Gate of Heavenly Peace. Beginning with 
Stilt Dancers of Long Bow Village (1981), Gordon, who was trained as a still photographer, has acted as primary cinematographer on all their films, 

44 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



while Hinton conducts the interviews. 

The epic political struggles depicted in Gate are a departure from 
Hinton and Gordon's more intimate portraits in One Village in China 
(1987), a film trilogy that examines the life of a Catholic village doctor 
(To Taste One Hundred Herbs) , the status of women in Chinese society 
(Small Happiness), and the de-collectivization of land in the mid-eight- 
ies (All Under Heaven) . Each delves into cultural, economic, and spiri- 
tual issues in great detail, using interviews, voiceover narration, and lyri- 
cal photography to create a portrait of a Chinese people during a time of 
enormous change, when the past collides with the future. But none 
approaches the ambitious scale of The Gate of Heavenly Peace. Nor had 
the two filmmakers tackled an archival project previously, let alone one 
this size. 




Hinton and Gordon began thinking about doing a film as soon as 
the monumental events of May 1989 began unfolding. "It was not an 
easy decision to get into something like this," Hinton admits. "I knew 
that any documentary — to say nothing of something of this scale, 
between the funding and the research and the actual making of the 
film — would probably take years of our lives. Once we decided, it really 
did take five or six years." A grant from the National Endowment for the 
Humanities "to push the frontier of scholarship," Hinton recalls, is what 
got the project moving. "We had to work with scholars to do original 
research on all fronts," Hinton recalls. "That's impossible to do without 
the kind of support we got from the NEH." Hinton also credits crucial 
startup monies from the Ford and Rockefeller foundations. Funding 
from the Independent Television Service came in at a later stage. 

Universal Pictures also provided $150,000 in seed money, and that 
has complicated the distribution picture. According to the filmmakers, 
their contract with the studio states that if any company other than 
Universal distributes the film to commercial theaters, the money must 
be paid back. Since few distributors willing to pick up a three-hour doc- 
umentary on China would provide an advance that large, it's Universal 
or no one for theatrical distribution. And Universal passed after seeing 



a 30-minute clip (Hinton notes that "to revise it for their standards would 
make it unacceptable to our standards"). So the film will probably be con- 
signed to nontheatrical distribution and nonprofit art houses. Hinton also 
points out that "paying them back is not the only hurdle for theatrical 
release." There's also the matter of licensing fees for all that archival 
footage, which mounts considerably when theatrical rights are added. 

Their primary goal was to create a credible record of the confusing and 
still widely contested facts of the uprising, one that draws on a truly 
diverse pool of subjects. "The number-one concern we had was for the 
film to be a forum for a range of different voices talking about what China 
needs," says Hinton. Those voices were largely absent from Western news 
coverage of the uprising. "One thing that struck me was that hardly any 
Chinese got to really speak, Hinton recalls. "Mainly it was American 
anchors or reporters explaining what the Chinese wanted or did and did- 
n't do.... You could hardly hear any Chinese 
voices finish an idea, or even a sen- 
tence." Any time a Chinese person 
started to speak, Gordon says, the 
anchors tended to "look for a cut- 
"JimJl away." Gate features 

,/ interviews with stu- 
dent leaders, 
union leaders, aca- 
demics, former 
government offi- 
cials, the par- 
ent of a 
slain 
student, 
and a pop 
star from 
Taiwan who 
took part in the 
h u n g e r 
strikes on 
the square, 
among others. 

While many of the key players go before the duo's camera (including 
union leader Han Dongfang, literary critic Liu Xiaobo, and reformist 
politician Wu Guoguang), Gordon notes that "We talked to a lot of dif- 
ferent types of participants, people who are not well known and didn't 
have anything to gain or lose by what they said. And often times those 
are the best sources." 

In trying to make sense of the diverse array of testimony, Gordon says, 
"The first level was to get the facts straight. That took years." Finding out 
what really happened turned out to be far more difficult than either had 
anticipated. "We found there's just a huge amount of disinformation," 
says Gordon, "so we had to talk to as many people as we could, because 
often times people would make self-serving statements. In other cases, 
people would say things that I think they genuinely believed to he true, 
but we found by reconstructing events on video from several different 
perspectives that they were not true." 

They also wanted to avoid sensationalism and present a sober, even- 
handed portrait of the uprising. "We didn't want to tell a simple cb 

logical story where the drum heats Lister and taster as you approach the 
oighl ot June V says Gordon. They also wanted to dispel the impression 
that the army shot their way "all the way to the center ot Tiananmen 
Square," says Hinton, and "slaughtered then way to the monument, 



Photo: AP/World Wide; all photos courtesy 
Long Bow Group 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 45 



"The first level was to get the facts 



where thousands of students were." She adds, "The reality was much 
more complicated." The film has been criticized for being too nice to the 
government, but as Hinton responds, "Just because they opened fire on 
peaceful protesters doesn't mean that you can say anything." 

Filming in China on a topic still so sensitive to the government pre- 
sented many difficulties. (The Chinese government still refuses to discuss 
the June 4 massacre and denies that anyone other than soldiers were 
killed.) Not the least of these obstacles was getting people to talk on 
camera, since there still is the fear of reprisal from the government. But, 
according to Hinton, many people are "courageously staying in China 
and trying to push the limits of free speech, of intellectual debate. They 
were very open and above board about what they believe in, and they feel 
it's their duty to speak out." Anyone who appeared on camera or gave 
them footage was free to back out at almost any stage. In a few cases, 
Hinton recalls, it was the filmmakers who pulled the plug. "Even though 
the person was willing to go on the record, we thought the situation was 




a little too precarious and decided not to do it." Gordon summed up 
their attitude by saying, "We have always believed that people's ongoing 
lives were more important than the development of our film." 

Assembling the miles of film and video footage was a massive organi- 
zational task. "We were a bit naive when we started," Gordon confesses. 
"We thought we could go through about seventy to one hundred hours 
of material, both network and home video. It turned out we had to go 
through almost four times that." Some of the most striking footage was 
taken with consumer-grade video cameras, especially shots during the 
bloodiest and most chaotic parts of the massacre. "Because of the [eco- 
nomic] reforms," Hinton explains, "there were some cameras in private 
hands, whereas that was unheard of before." Nonetheless, this was not 
easy material to locate. "There's no one place to go," says Gordon. "We 
just tried to put out as wide a net as possible." 

In trying to gain access to network news broadcasts and other archi- 
val footage, the filmmakers found many common assumptions to be 

unfounded. Take, for exam- 
ple, the ease of dealing with 
American versus Chinese TV 
networks. According to 
Gordon, "It's much easier to 
function in China than 
amongst capitalist barracud- 
as." He cites their chief bogey- 
man as being CNN, saying 
they were "just a nightmare to 
deal with." Ultimately, the 
archival research took on a 
truly transnational character, 
with research also being con- 
ducted in Russia and Spain. It 
was a Spanish TV crew that 
shot the most interesting 
footage the night of June 3, 
when the Chinese army was 
ordered to recapture Tian- 
anmen Square. "It took liter- 
ally months to get access to 
their material, just because 
they're so disorganized," says 
Gordon. "We had to send 
people into Spain to work 
with them personally, because 
you can't work from a dis- 
tance." 

Altogether Hinton and 
Gordon amassed about 400 
hours of footage, making 
theirs the largest single 
archive on this subject. The 



46 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1996 



straight. That took years. 



future of this material remains in question, although Gordon is enthusi- 
astic about its potential. "We have a lot of the extant material on stu- 
dent demonstrations, so that one could, later on, provide that to schol- 
ars." Unfortunately, says Gordon, "A lot of the best footage.. .we can't 
distribute, because it's shot by network crews and protected by interna- 
tional copyright." Again, the Chinese material is far easier to distribute, 
since they are not signatories to the Berne Convention, an internation- 
al copyright agreement, and therefore do not have as many restrictions 
on what cannot be copied and redistributed. Despite Hinton and 
Gordon's aspiration to create an archive of the footage they amassed, it 
remains in dry dock. "One of our hopes is that, since we had spent so 
much time with it and databased it and in many cases translated it," says 
Gordon, "we can find some good homes for it. We're really hoping that 
we can find an enlightened foundation or patron to allow us to make it 
accessible to literally thousands of potential users." Their de facto 
archive contains not only footage of demonstrations (reaching back to 
the twenties), but Chinese newscasts, music videos, and other images 
that, as Gordon says, build up a sense of the fabric of Chinese life. 



Criticism of The Gate of Heavenly Peace first started to hit the 
fan a good five months before its premiere at the New York Film Festival 
last September. The filmmaking duo have been fighting battles of one 
kind or another ever since. 

The first wave of controversy centered around their depiction of the 
divisions within the student camp and how one faction, led by Chai 
Ling, were pushing for a confrontation with the Army despite the 
inevitably deadly consequences. An especially prickly point concerns a 
TV interview given days before the massacre by Chai Ling in which she 
says, "What we are actually hoping for is bloodshed... Only when the 
square is awash with blood will the people of China open their eyes." 
(Chai, who currently lives in Boston, refused the filmmakers' repeated 
requests for an interview.) A debate ensued in the New York Times over 
the exact translation of this statement. It began with a New York Times 
article on April 30, 1995, about Chai and the dissidents six years after 
the event. Journalist Patrick Tyler quoted the statement and questioned 
some of the student leaders' tactics. Chai claimed in a letter to the edi- 
tor published the following week that the English equivalent of her 
statement is not "hoping for bloodshed" but "what we can expect next 
is bloodshed." Hinton, who included this interview in the film, wrote to 
the Times, "The Chinese word 'qidai' can only mean 'hoping for' and any 
native speaker of Chinese would agree"; her letter, however, was not 
published. 

Just a few days before this skirmish, Chai published an article attack- 
ing the as-yet-unfinished film in World Journal, a North American, pro- 
dissident Chinese language newspaper. It was reprinted in several dissi- 
dent newspapers as well as the Hong Kong journal Ming Pao Monthly. 
She wrote, "Certain individuals, for the sake of gaining approval of the 
[Chinese] authorities, have racked their brains for ways and means to 
come up with policies for them. And there is another person with a pro- 



Communist history [Hinton] who has been hawking [her] documentary 
film for crude commercial gain by taking things out of context and trying 
to show up something new, unreasonably turning history on its head and 
calling black white." 

This was the start of a "virtual mini-mountain" of condemnations of 
the film by Chinese student dissidents, according to Geremie Barme, one 
of the film's scriptwriters and author of an upcoming book In the Red: 
Studies in Contemporary Chinese Culture. Significantly, these all came long 
before The Gate of Heavenly Peace had been completed. Hinton and 
Gordon both point to the sad irony — that the proponents of democratic 
reform are using inflammatory and defensive rhetoric to stifle opposition 
to anything they do. Hinton's Chinese Communist education taught her 
that compromise is bad, she explains, so people do not believe one can be 
critical of something that is in some ways positive. The students defam- 
ing the film "are the children of the Communists," Gordon notes. "They 
have become what they hate." 

Next, the Chinese government condemned the film, "almost as could 
be predicted," Hinton wryly notes. Again these statements came before 
the film was finished, without anyone in the government having seen it. 
When Chinese officials caught wind that Gate was to be shown in the 
New York Film Festival, an official from the Chinese Consulate in New 
York went to program director Richard Peiia and demanded that the film 
be removed. When Pena flatly declined, the government urged director 
Zhang Yimou to stay home rather than accompany his film Shanghai Triad 
to the festival, where it held the prestigious opening night spot. Zhang, 
dependent on government support to keep working, quietly agreed. 

Overnight, The Gate of Heavenly Peace became a cause celebre. While 
both filmmakers seem grateful for the incredible amount of publicity gen- 
erated, they are philosophic about the Chinese protests. "Certain officials 
were doing this for other officials to see," Hinton speculates, noting that 
it was important within Government circles to appear belligerent and 
uncompromising towards the perceived enemy. Gordon points out, "It's 
not clear they were responding to our movie. They have not seen our 
movie." Rather, they were acting more on an assumption that they 
wouldn't like it, which, Gordon chuckles, "was a pretty good guess." 

Despite the furor surrounding the film, The Gate of Heavenly Peace is a 
thoughtful, serious work that maintains a sense of credibility and histori- 
cal tentativeness. The facts of Tiananmen Square in June 1989 are still 
not fully known, say Hinton and Gordon, and may not be lor many wars 
to come, possibly until China undergoes yet another major political 
mutation in the post-Deng era. Until then, one must turn to the dis- 
parate, contradictory voices of the Chinese participants. The overall 
effect is not a neat historical package, but it makes real the experience as 
lived by individual people. And like all of Hinton and ( iordon's work, this 
sense ot firsthand experience, of intimacy, is what it's all about — even tor 
a subject as epic as this. As Hinton says, "History is made by numerous 
individuals wrestling with their personal decisions. .And that's the mosl 
important thing for us." 

Jerry White is on the program staff of the Neighborhood Rfrn Video Proja t and the 

Philadelphia Festival oj World Cinema. 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 47 



A GUIDE TO 9f 

The Secrets to Many Happy Returns 




In SOME CIRCLES, OUR FEATURE FILM BROTHER'S KEEPER IS MORE FAMOUS tacts, and know-how. The battle for that box office gross was hard-won, 

for its self-distribution effort than for the film itself. After all, it earned and it took more than a year of our lives. Would my partner, Bruce 

almost $1.5 million at the box office — an impressive box office gross for Sinofsky, and I do it again, knowing what we know now? Definitely. After 

any independent film, let alone one without the benefit of a marketing all, upon the conclusion of our theatrical release, Brother's Keeper went 

and sales campaign waged by an established distributor with clout, con- on to a successful home video release (Fox Lorber), was broadcast on 



48 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 




PBS's American Playhouse (our primary source of postproduction financ- 
ing), and was televised in 17 countries worldwide. 

Before we began showing Brother's Keeper on the festival circuit, the 
film might not have seemed a likely candidate for theatrical distribution. 
First of all, it is a nonfiction film — yes, a documentary. For years docu- 
mentaries have been viewed as even more noxious to distributors than 
foreign films. For instance, Variety reported that documentary features 
account for only one-tenth of one percent of the total 1994 national box 
office receipts. Second, the film is about a small rural community in 
upstate New York and four illiterate dairy farmers, one of whom was 
accused of murdering his elderly bed-mate and brother. At first look, this 
is not an auspicious scenario for boffo box office. 

In January 1992, the film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival 
where it won the coveted Audience Award. Then when it received 
extensive feature coverage and glowing reviews in such publications as 
Variety, the Hollywood Reporter, Premiere, and the New York Times, we 
fully expected to walk away with a sweet distribution deal and a nice 
chunk of change as an advance. Some distribution offers were made, but 
respectable advances were not part of the proposed deals. In general, 
distributors offered us piddling advances or none at all. And most of 
those distributors wanted to release the film in 16mm, which would 
automatically ghettoize the film to a limited number of art houses. 

Most important, no one seemed to have a concrete, specialized mar- 
keting plan to handle our odd little film. Some distributors acquire a 
large number of independent films relatively cheaply and indiscrimi- 
nately. They then toss them out into the marketplace, and it is sink or 
swim: the movies that immediately generate good box office are fol- 
lowed up on and nurtured with strong advertising campaigns and 
aggressive bookings. The rest are abandoned to their fate — and box 
office oblivion. We feared that without tender loving care, our film 
might be pulled by a distributor before it had time to find its audience. 

It became obvious that if Brother's Keeper were to succeed in the mar- 
ketplace, self-distribution was the only way to go. Bruce and I knew that 
only we would give the film the passionate, personal marketing and sales 
campaign that the film needed in order to find its audience. As with the 
production of the film itself, our self-distribution of Brother's Keeper was 
an unlikely success story of overcoming the odds without help. We pro- 
duced the film on weekends and evenings while holding down full-time 
jobs, and we did it without any financial assistance or co-production 
monies (until American Playhouse stepped in with completion funds after 
seeing a rough assembly of dailies). With self-distribution we believed 
that our enthusiasm and determination more than compensated for our 




January/February 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 49 



lack of distribution experience and know-how. 

What follows are some lessons and thoughts provoked by our particu- 
lar experience with Brother's Keeper. When writing this, I used the fol- 
lowing guideline: "Gee, I wish I had known this when we started." For us, 
the process of self- distribution involved reinventing the wheel because 
information is closely guarded. By and large, we set out on this journey 
without a road map. Perhaps the lessons outlined below can help you 
make a more informed decision than we did. 

Distributors Can Be (and Often Are) Dead Wrong 

The single most important factor in the success of self-distribution is your 
deep, strong, and unshakable belief in your film. The fact that distribu- 
tors and, later, some theaters pass over your film does not mean that it is 
not marketable. The history books bulge with stories of films that dis- 
tributors thought were duds but went on to critical and box office suc- 
cess. Conversely, innumerable "sure-fire hits" have bombed at the box 
office, creating ulcers and unemployment for many a distribution execu- 
tive. The lesson: It is almost impossible to predict success, so if you real- 
ly believe in your film, do not accept a lousy distribution deal. 

Self-distribution should not be considered a last resort. You should 
think of it as a viable option, along with (one hopes) other distribution 
offers. If you want a bigger advance, or if you feel that the distributor does 
not really understand or appreciate your film, or if the marketing plan is 
not consistent with your vision of the film, then self- distribution might 
be the way to go. 

There Are (Much) Easier Ways to Make a Living 

Before you turn down those no-advance distribution offers, however, be 
forewarned: there are easier ways to make a living than self- distribution. 
In fact, putting the funding together to get your film made might seem 
like a piece of cake in comparison. Self-distribution is not for everybody. 
The established distribution system is ruthless to low-budget, offbeat 
films. You are the first to be pulled off the screen by the theaters, and you 
are the last to be paid. Prints, advertising, and professional promo mate- 
rials are expensive. And the work is all-consuming. 

Before you dive into self-distribution, ask yourself if you are willing to 
expend the time and energy needed. Bruce and I spent literally a solid 
year distributing Brother's Keeper to the exclusion of all other work. 
When the critical success of Brother's Keeper began to attract offers to 
direct new projects, we needed tremendous will power to turn them 
down. We had to take ourselves out of production just as the time was 
ripe for us to sign new deals. In order to succeed, we devoted ourselves 
one hundred percent to distribution. We hoped that those offers to direct 
new projects would still be around in a year. It is a risk you should be pre- 
pared to take. 

Why do it, then? If a distribution deal does not materialize, there is no 
choice — self-distribute or give up the idea of a theatrical release. For oth- 
ers (as with us), self- distribution is better than accepting a bad deal. It 
assures you creative control over every aspect of your film's marketing 
and promotion. This control was especially important and gratifying for 
us. From poster design to trailers to press releases, our imprint — for bet- 
ter or worse — was on everything. Self-distribution is also a great way to 
learn the distribution game. You will be much more savvy the next time 
you sit down to hammer out a distribution deal. 



Image Is Everything 

The most successful self-distribution effort begins long before the film is 
finished. Thinking about marketing even before you expose your first 
frame of film will pay off with valuable dividends — either landing you a 
better distribution deal, or giving you the tools to launch a successful 
self- distribution effort. 

Here are some ways to think about marketing right from the start. 



f O * • T I M « IIJI* N » T I O N W I O I 



"SUPERB. REMARKABLY RICH. HAUNTS THE MIND." 

-TWO THUMBS UPS ONE OF THE BEST MOVIES OF 
THE YEAR (EBERT). AS RIVETING AS ANY MYSTERY 
HOLLYWOOD HAS MADE UP (SISKEL)." 

-M«nu * *St«T 

"**•* INSPIRED & ELOQUENT." 

tMGWRsr RATIM.i .mid MIMMNM, H4KM! 



BROTHER; 
KEEPER 

inuitJOk BtatUSGC* »t> BRt CE STCOFSIO 

A Heartwarming Tale of Murder 

(«UMtt IH! lilt MCMIITMT x 
WTKHUllOllDHHnW HWrOMHUKimaciKU J 




2 col x 3.5" ■ T 



BROTHERS 
KEEPER 



Iff! 

■mm 
inttt 



1001X1**1 



BROTHERS 
KEEPER 



t 

mm- 



au« 



"SUPERB. REMARKABLY RICH. 
HAUNTS THE MIND." 

-VIMCKtf? I A.NW, V* TVWr* 

"TWO THUMBS UPr 

■jumuei * em rr 

BROTHER 
KEEPER 

A Heartwarming Tale of Murder 

inn JH nuvawBU vv»no 




1 col x 2* = 2' 



• Title: Some film titles just grab you. Others are a bore, or are so per- 
sonal that they have no meaning to the viewer. Try to come up with a 
snappy title that takes on a life of its own. The title Brother's Keeper came 
to me early in the production. I had been dragged to synagogue by my 
father-in-law one beautiful September morning during the High Holy 
Days. Since my Hebrew is less than perfect, I was flipping through the 
Bible to keep the boredom at bay. I just happened to come across the pas- 
sage about Cain and Abel and immediately realized that Brother's Keeper 
was a perfect title. It felt right, and Bruce and I never seriously consid- 
ered another option. 

• Tag line: Almost as important as the title is the movie's tag line. In a 
few short words, you have another chance to tease your potential ticket- 
buyer into seeing the movie. Most people loved our choice of "A 
Heartwarming Tale of Murder." Although the tag line did draw audi- 



50 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



ences, it also elicited some strong reactions from viewers who thought it 
was misleading — that it implied Delbert Ward had, indeed, murdered 
his brother Bill. Our belief is that the tag line suits the film well; both 
are full of ambiguity. After all, murder is generally not considered a 
heartwarming activity. So, the tag line could imply that Delbert is guilty 
or innocent — or both. It conveys both the tenor of the film (heart- 
warming) and the "plot" (murder) . And frankly, a little bit of contro- 
versy is good for publicity. 

• Stills: While you are shooting your film, take plenty of stills. Bring a 
photographer along (and make sure you appear in some of the pictures) . 




Left: The ad slicks pro 
vided by Sinofsky and 
Berlinger came in a vari- tne mm 
ety of standard sizes, 
with a blank space for 
theaters to list show- 
times. 



The stills should be as evocative (if not more!) than 



Above.- Advertising, 
Manhattan-style. When 
Brother's Keeper 
reopened in New York 
City after a five month 
hiatus, up went the 
posters with a 'back by 
popular demand' sticker. 



• Behind-the-scenes footage: As long as you are 
taking stills, do yourself a favor and grab some B-roll 
of you and your crew working (a consumer Hi-8 
machine will do). If your film has a special angle, 
and you have success in getting television press for 
your film during its release, you will be glad to have 
this footage. With the proliferation of EPKs 
(Electronic Press Kits), segment producers have 
come to expect behind-the-scenes footage. It could 
mean the difference between landing a story and 
losing one. With our B-roll in hand, we ended up on 
CNN's Show Biz Weekly and on Entertainment 
Tonight, among others. 

• Press Kits: Start creating the elements for your press kit from Day 
One. Think carefully how to position your film in the press materials. 
We were surprised to see just how much of our written material was 
picked up and reported — in some cases verbatim — by the press. If your 
press release, synopsis, bios, and director's statement are well-written, 
editors and reporters will be more likely to feature your film in their pub- 
lication. Try to get any press you can about the making of your film — 
even from hometown papers — and include clips in your press packets. 

• Logo and stationery: Your logo is one of the most important elements 
in your marketing campaign. You do not, however, have to spend a lot 
ot money on graphic designer fees to come up with an effective logo. 
One day while flipping through my typeface book, I discovered a type 
called Caslon Antique that evoked antique type used 200 years ago. 
That discovery led us to use our title Brother's Keeper as the star of the 



logo. It was a simple, easy, and inexpensive solution that served us well. 

A couple of years ago I attended the IFFM (Independent Feature Film 
Market) as a buyer. The marketing literature that landed in my box was 
appallingly amateurish: sloppy handwritten flyers, out-of-focus photos, 
and press releases with typos and grammatical errors. It was a real turn- 
off. I could not help but wonder how good the films could be if the mar- 
keting was so bad. 

While not every filmmaker can be a marketing expert, you must make 
sure that everything you create conveys a professional image — from press 
releases to flyers, from logo treatments to postcards. You want the world 
to take you seriously. As a self-distributor, you have no track record and 
your film is an unknown quantity, so many theaters will ask for some 
promo materials before they decide to book your film. Therefore, the 
more professionally you present yourself, the more confident a theater 
will feel, and the more likely they will be to book you. 

You Need an Organizational Structure 

As simple as it sounds, many people who ask my advice have not thought 
about creating an organizational structure to service their release. It does 
not have to be fancy — after all, we started marketing Brother's Keeper in 
my small Brooklyn apartment, and we cleaned and shipped prints from 
Bruce's house in New Jersey. Eventually, we moved into an office as our 
release expanded and we knew we could pay rent. 

Like any small business, you should determine areas of responsibility 
for each member of the company. Bruce, Loren Eiferman (my wife), and 
I worked full-time with a part-time assistant (who later became full-time 
once the release was in full swing). The hours could be absolutely gruel- 
ing. At the height of the madness, there were many nights when we rolled 
into bed near dawn. 

How are you going to keep track of which theaters you have contact- 
ed? Who will negotiate the terms of the bookings? Who will take care of 
contracts and bookkeeping? How will you do your photocopying? What 
about a phone system — will you have a simple voice mail system or some- 
one who will answer the phone during business hours? 

How will you handle print and poster shipping? Will you hire a service, 
or will you do it yourself? We chose to do it ourselves because we wanted 
to be in control of what marketing materials were shipped and to know 
at all times where our prints were. We felt we would maximize our print 
collection by handling the shipping ourselves. Shipping can be a night- 
mare — be prepared to track down lost prints and posters. 

It is also crucial that you develop a plan to get paid and to track 
money. You must create professional invoices and send them regularly. 
You need to figure out how to deal with not getting paid, which unfortu- 
nately happens more than you will like. In fact, the aggressive pursuit of 
money due you is perhaps the most unpleasant task of distribution. Two 
years after the theatrical release of Brother's Keeper ended, we are still try- 
ing to collect our share of the grosses from a number ol theaters. As you 
struggle to collect monies owed you, the hills will mount. I lien you, in 
turn, have to juggle paying your creditors. 

Expect to Reinvent the Wheel 

The first decision you will have to make is whether to book the film sour- 
sell or lure an independent booking agent. The advantage "t an ageni is 
that he/she presumably lias connections and a track record, and you can 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 51 



he free to work on marketing and publicity. (If you do decide to go with 
a booking agent, make sure you check carefully that the agent can indeed 
deliver what he/she promises.) The major downside to a booking agent is 
that you are giving up a sizable piece of the pie, since the booking agent 
will want a percentage of your revenue. Because there were two of us — 
and we are control freaks — we decided to book the film ourselves. We 
were able to share responsibilities. I tended to focus on marketing and 
publicity, and Bruce tended to focus on booking and transport — although 
we swapped hats on many occasions. 

A small handful of distribution executives were very generous with 
their advice when we started doing our homework. However, by and 
large, distributors tend to hang on tight to their information. Therefore, 
you have to do your homework, and you will often feel like you are rein- 
venting the wheel. 

Do not despair! The information is out there. When we could not find 
a list of theaters that play art films, we made weekly trips to a specialty 

magazine store that carries out-of-town 
papers, purchased newspapers from other 
cities, and looked at the movie page to 
determine which theaters were playing 
our kind of film. Then, we'd call the 
theater to find out who owned it and/or 
booked it (information is often in the 
ads) and then called the bookers. 
At the risk of stating the obvious, all 
theaters/markets are not alike. In 
some cases you will be required to 
pay for all the marketing and adver- 
tising. Some theaters require less 
investment and carry less risk. 
They take care of the bulk of the 
advertising, but the payout will 
not be as good. 

Some theaters are calendar hous- 
es — they set 
their schedule 
months in 

advance and 
print detailed 
and unchange- 
able schedules. 
Even if your 
film is doing 
extremely well, 
a calendar 

house cannot 

The fruits of their labors: bookings in Chicago, Los Angeles, extend your run 
Manhattan, upstate New York, and many theaters in (unless thev have 

between. 

du * f i a i tu * e* u r> ^ ii' more than one 

Photo of Landmark Theater: Stephen D. Cannerelli, 

Syracuse Newspapers screen). 

Most theaters 

operate with open engagements and respond to the demands of the mar- 
ketplace. Theoretically, they will hold on to your film as long as it keeps 
selling tickets. One of the frustrations of self- distribution, however, is 
that even if your film is doing well in an open engagement, the estab- 
lished distribution companies will often demand that the theater pull 
your film prematurely to make way for their films. The theater, not want- 




ing to offend a regular supplier, usually acquiesces, thus denying you the 
chance to exploit fully that particular market. 

Theaters can be very territorial. If they do not premiere a film in their 
city, they might not take it as a "move-over," and if they also have 
screens in other cities, they might not book the film at all because of the 
snub in their home market. For instance, when we decided to open 
Brother's Keeper in New York City at the Film Forum, we alienated a 
booker for another New York theater who also books more than 30 the- 
aters nationwide. We had a good run in New York, but we lost quite a 
few good venues elsewhere because of our decision. 

You cannot make sweeping generalizations about theaters. 
Independent art houses are not necessarily kind-hearted and nurturing 
places for filmmakers; nor are theater chains always cold, unsympathet- 
ic, and bureaucratic. We encountered some theater chains that were ter- 
rific. The Nickelodeon in Boston — part of the Loews Theater chain at 
the time — was one of our best venues. They were great to work with, 
they gave our film attention and care, and they paid us promptly. 

On the other hand, some privately owned small art houses were hor- 
rible and, to this day, we are still trying to collect from some of them. By 
and large, however, most art houses get high marks from us — they are 
usually in the business because they love good movies. 

Plan Ahead 

Self-distribution requires a lot of lead time. Calendar houses book at 
least four to six months in advance, so give yourself plenty of time to 
pitch the movie, close the deal, and get the dates you want. Outline a 
strategy for release. We started out by releasing the film in New York and 
San Francisco. New York is the crucial venue. If you do not develop an 
audience in New York (and get some good reviews), you will probably 
have a hard time building momentum in other cities. In fact, if you bomb 
in New York, that could be the death knell for your self-distribution cam- 
paign. On the other hand, doing well in New York gives you immediate 
clout in the marketplace. Many theaters in the smaller markets read the 
ads religiously in the Village Voice to gauge how the independent films are 
faring. 

If you don't want to take the calculated risk of opening in New York, 
you can try to begin your release in smaller cities and build toward the 
major markets. And if you do well, it might help you secure better 
venues in the bigger cities. Ultimately, though, in order to have a signif- 
icant self- distribution release, you must open — and succeed — in at least 
one of the major markets: New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, and, to a 
lesser degree, Washington, D.C. 

Festivals can be an important adjunct to your self-distribution effort. 
They can generate reviews before you begin your release. Those reviews, 
in turn, can be used to sell the picture. If your festival screening imme- 
diately precedes your release in that particular city, the festival press cov- 
erage can boost your own marketing. Be careful, however, not to get lost 
on the festival circuit. First of all, with the proliferation of festivals 
worldwide, the circuit can be a drain of time, money, and energy. Also, 
be aware that in some markets, the press coverage that accompanies fes- 
tival screenings might eliminate all possibilities for additional coverage 
when you release the film theatrically at a later date. By that time, your 
film will be old news. So, in some markets it is better to pass on festival 
press coverage and to hold out for your theatrical release if the release 
date does not coincide with the festival dates. 



52 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



Turn a Negative into a Positive 

As a self-distributor you will be operating with several strikes against you 
before you even get started, especially if your film is a documentary. Use 
your ingenuity to transform those obstacles into advantages. 

For instance, it is likely that you will be working with a minuscule 
budget, which means that paid advertising beyond the minimum level 
that some theaters require — especially in big cities — is prohibitive. 
Unless you are going to spend tons of money, most advertising is like 
whistling in the wind. 

Many theaters require that you do some advertising with small dis- 
play ads and/or by inclusion in group ads or co-op listings. But after 
those minimal expenditures, spend your money wisely by doing grass- 
roots marketing, which is labor intensive, but cheap. Identify groups that 
will find your film interesting. For instance, we marketed Brother's Keeper 
to professional associations and community groups: from law schools to 
advocacy groups for older people, from psychology associations to rural 
organizations and civil liberty groups. Recruit some interns to pass out 
flyers at other theaters and to post flyers in university hangouts. Create 
a buzz by having friends stand in line for other movies and loudly talk up 
your film. The downside of grassroots marketing is that it is very labor 
intensive. Therefore, the number of cities you can handle at any one 
time will be limited, which can significantly slow down the momentum 
of your release. 

Create lots of "homecoming" screenings — go back to your childhood 
town, your cinematographer's college, your leading man's summer 
camp — and relentlessly pursue that local angle. I grew up in Chappaqua, 
New York, went to Colgate University in upstate New York, and lived in 
Brooklyn. My parents were living in Florida. Bruce's childhood home 
was in Newton, Massachusetts; he attended college in Amherst; and 
during filming he lived in Montclair, New Jersey. That gave us seven 
excuses to create homecoming events surrounding our openings in those 
markets. 

If I have not driven this point home yet, I will say it again: press, press, 
and more press. Feature articles, blurbs, photos and captions, reviews, TV 
appearances, radio interviews — they are all better than paid advertising, 
and they are free. Hire a publicist for the more routine tasks like setting 
up press screenings and distributing press kits. You should, however, 
make sure that you take a very active part in creating your own spin on 
the film. Figure out a unique, catchy angle on how your project came 
about. For us, it was the now overused story of weekend no-budget film- 
makers financing a film on credit cards. Every film has a story — you 
must find it and exploit it. 

Know When to Spend Money 

Even though your budget is small, there are certain items that you 
should not skimp on: film prints, posters, and trailers. 

• Prints: 35mm prints are more expensive than 16mm, but infinitely 
more useful. 1! you shot on 16mm, seriously consider blowing it up to 
35mm (a major expenditure — about $40,000 in our case). If you try to 
distribute with 16mm, you are relegating yourself to a limited number of 
art houses — approximately 70 nationwide — which limits your potential 
gross. On a purely practical note, 16mm prints net damaged more easily 
than 35mm prints do. But, ot course, a 16mm print is one-third the cost 
of a 35mm print. 



Only strike as many prints as you will need, but do not skimp. It takes 
solid planning to figure out your print schedule, and you do not want to 
lose a date for lack of a print. Prints do get lost or delayed in shipping, so 
you should have one or two extras for back-up. We started out by strik- 
ing 5, and then upped it in increments of 5 to 10, 15, and 30 prints. At 
$1,600 a pop, that is another $50,000 investment. 

• Posters: We lost some important dates early on because we did not 

have good movie posters. Theaters 
want and expect standard- 
size posters, and frequently 
they will not book the film 
without them. When we 
first started the release, we 
printed half- sized posters to 
save money, but we quickly 
discovered that our cost- 
saving measure had actu- 
ally lost us money. For 
instance, a prestigious 
theater in Providence, 
Rhode Island, was 
ready to book Broth- 
er's Keeper until they 
found out that we did 
not have the right size 
posters. We did open in 
New York without pos- 
ters. As a result, I ran 
around putting together 
make-shift displays that 
did not quite look profes- 
sional and needed to be 




redone by hand at the start of 



each engagement — a big waste of time. 



• Trailers: Most theaters ask for trailers. If effective, they can be one of 
the best means of promoting your film. A trailer is like a free two-minute 
commercial shown to your target audience. By the time we realized we 
needed a trailer, our negative was tied up with the 35mm blow-up, so we 
had to act fast and creatively. It occurred to me that a testimonial from 
Spalding Gray might work. He had presented the Audience Award to us 
at Sundance, and in his speech he related an anecdote that later became 
the makings of our trailer. In his signature style, he explained that 
Brother's Keeper had enthralled him so much that he couldn't even leave 
the theater to go to the toilet despite desperately needing to pee. 

So when we had to produce a trailer quickly, we contacted Spalding 
and asked him if he would relate the anecdote again on film. Shot in oui 
"documentary" style in his writer's studio in the Hamptons, the trailer 
itself became a cult mini-film and generated its own buzz. 

Develop a Thick Skin 

This is as much of a life lesson as a distribution lesson: everyone says no. 
Therefore, do not take it personally. And perseverance pays. 

As an example, we urged Karen Cooper, the head ot Film Forum, to 
present Brother's Keeper. We screened the film tor her in New York, and 
she gave us a firm no. Although thai could have been the end ot the story, 



January/February 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 53 



Better than paid 
advertising is 
free press. 
Here, the direc- 
tors and Ward 
brothers get 
quality time on 
the Maury 
Povich talk 
show, broadcast 
nationally. 



FPfgMffH^ 


—I ~J — „ _ j! — | — ( 1 TBfc 


^KKKSKmlmm^ 1 ^ jMBKM^^ 



when the 

film screened at the Berlin Film Festival, we persuaded Karen to watch it 
again, this time with an audience. The energy of the crowd (who loved 
the film) convinced Karen to take it on, and as a result, Brother's Keeper 
began its theatrical life at Film Forum — in our opinion one of the very 
best venues in the country. 

The Spectrum Theater in Albany seemed like a good bet for Brother's 
Keeper. Munnsville, New York (the village of 499 that is the locale of the 
film), is only 100 miles away, which gave the film a strong local appeal. 
The theater presents a well-balanced mix of Hollywood movies and spe- 
cialized independent films. One of the owners proved to be a very nice 
guy, but he did not believe that Brother's Keeper would find an audience. 
We worked hard over an extended period of time to convince him that 
he should give the film a shot. We talked with him on the phone fre- 
quently, sent him reviews, sent box office results from other markets, and 
eventually he relented and agreed to book it. As it happened, Albany 
turned out to be one of our best cities. We played there for seven weeks, 
and on a per capita basis it was one of our strongest markets. 

In one instance we played David to Disney's Goliath. The battle 
ground was the Coolidge Corner Cinema in Brookline, Massachusetts. 
When the theater split the screen between Brother's Keeper and Aladdin, 
Disney flexed its muscle and demanded that Brother's Keeper be pulled. 
(A split screen is when the theater schedules two different films at alter- 
nating times for the same screen on the same day.) For once the little guy 
won when Coolidge Corner stood up to Disney and refused to abandon 
Brother's Keeper. 

You will run into similar battles all along the way with theater owners, 
managers, and bookers. Since there are more films than ever and screen 
space is always at a premium, other distributors ruthlessly negotiate for 
bookings. Theaters will sometimes treat you and your film poorly because 
they do not want to offend distributors who provide them with a steady 
flow of desirable films. 

Unfortunately, many theaters will take months to pay or will never pay 
at all. Again, do not take it personally. Keep your cool, continue to send 
invoices, and make frequent phone calls. 

Nothing Beats the Personal Touch 

When Brother's Keeper opened in New York at the Film Forum, for the 
first three weeks Bruce and I showed up at the two main evening shows. 
We talked to the audience at the end of the screenings, answered ques- 
tions, and exhorted them to spread the word about the film. We firmly 
believe that our personal appearances significantly increased interest in 



the film. 

Some of the best moments were when we brought the stars of the 
film — the Ward Brothers themselves — to screenings. Because we did not 
want to exploit them and we feared they would not enjoy the limelight, 
we decided not to bring them to the New York City opening. But as the 
film rolled into upstate New York where the Wards had become local 
celebrities, the brothers themselves expressed interest in appearing at 
screenings within a two-hour radius of their home. Even though they did 
not speak much, the Wards' presence drew big audiences and made the 
screenings into "events." After a five-month hiatus, Brother's Keeper 
reopened in New York City, back by popular demand. By this time the 
Wards were enjoying their public appearances so much that we brought 
them to New York, giving the press a new excuse to write about the film 
when it otherwise would have been treated as old news. 

With each personal appearance, we enhanced our marketing efforts 
by selling hats, T-shirts, buttons and posters. As long as they are of good 
quality, these items serve as excellent marketing tools, and they generate 
ancillary income. 

Most important to remember is that the bigger markets (New York, 
Los Angeles, Boston, Chicago) are not necessarily more lucrative than 
the smaller markets. College towns are great places for specialized films, 
and the college press is eager to write big feature articles if you are will- 
ing to show up in town and do a Q & A session. Treat Boise like New 
York City. Tender loving care in the smaller markets can result in sub- 
stantial box office numbers. We earned more at the box office in Albany 
then we did in Los Angeles. And 20 percent of our total box-office came 
from the hinterlands of upstate New York where art films rarely appear, 
let alone do well. In the two nearest theaters to Munnsville — Oneida to 
the north and Hamilton to the south — Brother's Keeper has the all-time 
house record, out-grossing E.T., Star Wars, and Jurassic Park- 
in its 13 months of theatrical release, Brother's Keeper played more 
than 250 cities across the country and grossed nearly $1.5 million at the 
box office. As exhausting and challenging as it was, our self- distribution 
campaign allowed us to: 1) learn the distribution business inside-out; 2) 
get to know our audiences directly — a unique and fulfilling experience; 
and 3) earn a respectable profit through our own hard work. We often 
wonder what kind of business Brother's Keeper would have done in the 
care of one of the major independent distributors (e.g., Miramax, Fine 
Line, Goldwyn) with their infinitely larger P&A (prints and advertising) 
budgets. But, while more established distributors might have gotten 
higher grosses, they probably would not have marketed the film with as 
much enthusiasm, determination, or ingenuity as we did. 

Joe Berlinger and Bruce Sinofsky's next nonfiction feature, Paradise Lost:The Child 
Murders at Robin Hood Hills, will be screened at Sundance 1 996. The filmmakers 
plan once again to self distribute the film theatrically after its June premiere on HBO. 



This article is reprinted from The Next Step: Distributing Independent 
Film and Video, edited by Morrie Warshawski and available through its 
publisher, the Foundation for Independent Video and Film [see page 17 
for book orders]. 

An upcoming issue of The Independent will feature the essay 
"Stepping Out: The Art of Publicity," by film publicist Karen Larsen, 
also from The Next Step. From soup to nuts, Larsen details what's need- 
ed to develop, budget, and carry out an effective publicity campaign for 
a film launch. 



54 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



More Power to fcu 

The rvledia lOO 
TNTonlinear Editing System 




By Rob Rownd 



The Dream Machine 

The dream machine is a box that sits on a 
desk in the back of my mind, spitting out edit- 
ed, broadcast-quality video and freeing me 
from having to beg for low-cost editing time. 
With this mythical device I never have to 
stop editing personal projects to write grants 
for completion funds or watch my profits from 
a commercial job go up in smoke as a client 
ponders a 30-frame dissolve. This imaginary 
machine would join the SRII and the Nagra 
package as the third leg of true independent 
production. I could make the payments on it 
for the cost of one day of on-line time a 
month; I would be able to charge more for my 
work and keep the costs in-house; and best of 
all, since it would sit next to the fax machine 
in the room off the kitchen, I could roll out of 
bed at 3:00 a.m. and try out that great new 
idea for scene 28. 

The Real Machine 

The Media 100 V2.0 from Data Translation, 
running on a Power Mac 8100, comes pretty 
close to making the dream a reality. The two 
boards that digitize the video and audio infor- 
mation install in about an hour. Just watch 
the 45-minute instructional videotape a cou- 
ple of times, hose in either composite, com- 
ponent, or S-video, and all the basic com- 
mands can be learned in an afternoon. 



The Software 



The simple intuitive interface looks like a 
standard off-line editing bay: preview moni- 
tor on the top left, program monitor on the 
top right. A series of windows displaying clip 
bins, time lines, four tracks of audio, and tran- 
sitions can be opened and closed along the 
bottom third of the screen. 

Like all good Mac software, Media 100 




provides the user with multiple ways to give 
commands. Using the mouse, the editor can 
find the standard editing terms in the scroll- 
down menus. When this method becomes too 
time-consuming, pick up the manual and find 
the function key equivalents. (The exhaustive 
manuals aren't quite as dry as the ones that 
arrive with a new stereo, but aside from the 
tutorial, their utility is pretty much limited to 
hunting tor command sequences you can't fig- 
ure out otherwise.) Fortunately the learning 



curve on the program is shallow from start to 
finish. Even for someone whose computer 
know-how is limited to a handful of well-known 
programs, after one session the Media 100 is 
faster than off-lining with a tape-based system. 
.Alter three sessions it's much faster still. 

A hidden advantage ol digital editing is that 
once images and sound are loaded onto a hard 
drive, they are locked in place. The NTSC 
corkscrew (a holdover from the transition of 
black-and-white in color television, m which 



January/February 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 55 



BETA SP COMPONENT ON-LINE 



♦ ADO/Chyron Superscribe (optional) 

♦ Hi-8 Transfers 

♦ Duplication From All Formats 
Special Night Rates 



AVID 



On-Line 

♦ AVR27 - Component, in & out 

♦ 3D Real Time Effects 

Off-Line 

♦ MC-800 w/4 ch. Audio Playback 

Editor Training Available — Mac Graphics 

» # Great Support * 



on track video 

104 W. 29th St., 12th Floor (212)645-2040 



Krasnogorsk-3 16mm! 



Availab le hi Super 16mm 

HE2lS33£^S9H[ Standard 



Motorized! 

Crystal Sync Version 




Standard 
MMaa>M ^ M Wind-up Version 

u S ,$l,199! Ju s t $499! 



'Sophisticated optics, solid 
construction" - New York Times 
'A steal at twice the money" 

- Jack Watson Moviemaker Magazi 




The crystal sync K-3 camera comes with 
the standard set of accessories (see 
description at right) and 17-69mm lens. 
Thecamerawillrunat12,24,48fpsatsync 
and with the addition of an Aaton style 
speed crystal control all speeds between 
6 and 60f ps are possi ble. With the addition 
of the sync motor the K-3 is the ideal 
camera for music videos, second unit, or 
stunt camera work, at less than the cost of 
a traditional crystal sync motor alone. 
Motor made in USA. 

Tel 212 
Fax 212 



Mia 




Motion 
Picture 
Equipment 



All cameras come with a complete set of 
accessories including 1 7-69mm zoom lens, 
pistol grip, shoulder brace, five glass filters 
(ND, UV, Lightand Dark Yellow, #2 Diopter), 
cable release, case, warranty, and more! 
The camera utilizes a rotating mirror reflex 
finder, and an operating range from 8- 
50fps with single frame. Made of solid 
aluminum construction and coated optics. 
Find out for yourself why the K-3 is the 
most popular camera in America. Call 
today for a free brochure. 

-219-8408 1 06 Franklin St. #2 

219-8953 New York, NY 10013 



M heast Negative Matchers, Inc 

"Setting New Standards In Negative Cutting" 

Negative Cutting to Film or Video Workprint 

SPECIALIZING IN VIDEO MATCHBACK TO THE AVID FILM COMPOSER 

□35mm □ Super 16mm Q^mm 






25 Riverview Terrace • Springfield, MA 01 108 • 413/736-2177 • 800/370-CUTS 
North Miami Office 305/940-8878 



56 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



the color picture information is wrapped 
around the black-and-white picture informa- 
tion to yield an unruly and fickle signal) stays 
put as a series of digital Is and Os that don't 
shift in color or brightness. As a result, you 
spend your time editing rather then tweaking 
TBCs (Time Base Correctors) and juggling 
sound levels in a tedious attempt to match a 
previous edit session. This may seem like the 
computer equivalent of an auto iris to the 
more digitally inclined, but this absence of 
technical worries allows one to concentrate 
on the content of images and sounds them- 
selves and pushes the editing process further 
into the right-brain hemisphere. 

While some of this increased speed is the 
nature of the digital beast plus increased pro- 
ficiency with the command vocabulary, a 
larger part comes from the organizing tools 
incorporated into the software. The video 
and audio clips entered into the machine are 
identified by single frames of video or wave- 
forms of audio which resemble the preview 
thumbnails of Adobe PhotoShop or 
Illustrator. These clips can be identified by 
short narrative descriptions and timecode 
numbers and then assigned one of five colors. 
By combining a multiple sizing option with a 
malleable color coding feature, it is easy to 
•J look at a lot of footage a lot of different ways 
in a short amount of time. These features 
don't negate the need to bang four or five 
shots together and see what happens, but 
they make it very easy first to locate the keep- 
er takes, arranging those into sections, and 
then to organize the sections into types of 
shots and audio clips, all done without log 
sheets, post-it notes, or squinting around the 
edges of the timecode box of a window dub. 
In addition to speeding up the manual tasks 
of editing, Media 100 helps speed up the 
thought process as well. 

Another key advantage of the Media 100 
software is the ease with which one can shift 
between different compression rates and 
image qualities. Better pictures require larger 
files, which in turn require more space on 
your hard drive. With Media 100, broadcast- 
quality images can be stored at about three - 
and-a-half minutes per gigabyte. At this rate, 
a four- to five -gig hard drive gives you more 
than enough room to fine-cut a music video, 
commercial, standard-length corporate piece, 
or 10-minute short. (It's nowhere near 
enough space to deal with four cores' worth 
of dailies or even a 30-minute Betacam SP 
cassette, however.) Media 100 allows you to 



T 


H 


E 




A 


S S 


o c 


1 A T 


1 





N 




O 


F 




1 


D 


1 
E 


N 


D E 


P E 


N D 


E 


N 


T 


E 


R 




V 





& 


F 1 


L M 


M 


A 


K 


S 




iverse, committed, 
opinionated, and 
fiercely indepen- 
dent — these are the 
video and filmmak- 
ers who are mem- 
bers of AIVF. 
Documentary and 
feature filmmakers, animators, experi- 
mentalists, distributors, educators, 
students, curators — all concerned 
that their work make a difference — 
find the Association of Independent 
Video and Filmmakers, the national 
service organization for independent 
producers, vital to their professional 
lives. Whether it's our magazine, The 
Independent Film & Video Monthly, or 
the organization raising its collective 
voice to advocate for important 
issues, AIVF preserves your indepen- 
dence while letting you know you're 
not alone. 

AIVF helps you save time and money 
as well. You'll find you can spend 
more of your time (and less of your 
money) on what you do best — getting 
your work made and seen. To succeed 
as an independent today, you need a 
wealth of resources, strong connec- 
tions, and the best information avail- 
able. So join with more than 5,000 
other independents who rely on AIVF 
to help them succeed. 
JOIN AIVF TODAY! 

Here's what membership offers: 

THE INDEPENDENT FILM & 
VIDEO MONTHLY 

Membership provides you with a 
year's subscription to The Independent. 
Thought-provoking features, news, 
and regular columns on business, 



technical, and legal matters. Plus fes- 
tival listings, funding deadlines, exhi- 
bition venues, and announcements of 
member activities and new programs 
and services. Special issues highlight 
regional activity and focus on subjects 
including media education and the 
new technologies. 

INSURANCE 

Members are eligible to purchase dis- 
counted personal and production 
insurance plans through AIVF suppli- 
ers. A wide range of health insurance 
options are available, as well as special 
liability, E&.0, and production plans 
tailored for the needs of low-budget 
mediamakers. 

TRADE DISCOUNTS 

A growing list of businesses across the 
country offer AIVF members dis- 
counts on equipment and auto 
rentals, film processing, transfers, 
editing, and other production necessi- 
ties. Plus long-distance and overnight 
courier services are available at spe- 
cial rates for AIVF members from 
national companies. In New York, 
members receive discounted rates at 
two hotels to make attendance at our 
programs and other important events 
more convenient. 

CONFERENCE /SCREENING 
ROOM 

AIVF's new office has a low-cost 
facility for members to hold meetings 
and small private screenings of work 
for friends, distributors, programmers, 
funders, and producers. 



INFORMATION 

We distribute a series of publications 
on financing, funding, distribution, 
and production; members receive dis- 
counts on selected titles. AIVF's staff 
also can provide information about 
distributors, festivals, and general 
information pertinent to your needs. 
Our library houses information on 
everything from distributors to sample 
contracts to budgets. 

WORKSHOPS, PANELS, AND 
SEMINARS 

Members get discounts on events cov- 
ering the whole spectrum of current 
issues and concerns affecting the 
field, ranging from business and aes- 
thetic to technical and political top- 
ics. Plus: members-only evenings with 
festival directors, producers, distribu- 
tors, cable programmers, and funders. 

ADVOCACY 

Members receive periodic advocacy 
alerts, with updates on important leg- 
islative issues affecting the indepen- 
dent field and mobilization for collec- 
tive action. 

COMMUNITY 

AIVF sponsors monthly member get- 
togethers in cities across the country; 
call the office for the one nearest you. 
Plus members are carrying on active 
dialogue online — creating a "virtual 
community" for independents to 
share information, resources, and 
ideas. Another way to reach fellow 
independents to let them know about 
your screenings, business services, and 
other announcements is by renting 
our mailing list, available at a dis- 
count to members. 



MEMBERSHIP CATEGORIES 

Individual/Student Membership 

Year's subscription to The Independent • Access to all plans and discounts • Festival/ 
Distribution/Library services • Information Services • Discounted admission to seminars • 
Book discounts • Advocacy action alerts • Eligibility to vote and run for board of directors 

Supporting Membership 

All the above for two individuals at one address, with 1 subscription to The Independent 

Non-profit Organizational/Business & Industry Membership 

All the above benefits, except access to health insurance plans • 2 copies of The Independent 
• 1 free FIVF-published book per year • Complimentary bulk shipments of The Independent 
to conferences, festivals, and other special events • Special mention in The Independent • 
Representative may vote and run for board of directors 



Library Subscription 

Year's subscription to The Independent only 



JOIN AIVF TODAY 



'V 



Membership Rates 

□ $25/student (enclose copy of student ID) 

□ $45/individual 

□ $75/supporting 

Q $75/library subscription 
Q $100/non-profit organization 
Q $150/business & industry 
Q Magazines are mailed Second-class; add $20 
First class mailing 

Name(s) 



for 

$ 



Organization 

Address 

City 

State 



ZIP 



Country 

Weekday tel. 
Fax 



Acct # 



Foreign Mailing Rates 

Q Surface mail 

(incl. Canada &. Mexico) - Add $10 
□ Air mail 

— Canada, Mexico, Western Hemisphere- 
Add $20 

—Europe - Add $40 

— Asia, Pacific Rim, Africa - Add $50 

Membership cost 

Mailing costs (if applicable) 

Contribution tO FIVF (make separate tax-deductible check payable to FIVF) 

Total amount enclosed (check or money order ) 
Or please bill my □ Visa □ MC 



Exp. date I II I 



Signature_ 



AIVF, 304 Hudson St., 6th fl., NY, NY 10013; (212) 807-1400; fax (212) 463-8519 



save footage in a draft mode (which looks 
about the same as VHS) at 20 to 28 minutes 
per gigabyte, depending on the amount of 
audio information included. Once the draft 
mode footage is rough cut, you can redigitize 
the selected takes at broadcast quality and 
have the machine do a frame-accurate recut. 
If all the camera original is on one cassette, 
you can even leave the room while the 
machine is working. This is a big advantage 
for cost- conscious consumers. 

For all the benefits of the basic and inter- 
mediate functions of the program, there is a 
slight reluctance on the part of more sophisti- 
cated users to declare the Media 100 a perfect 
tool. Many animators and online editors agree 
that the $40,000 Media 100 had much better 
picture quality than the $70,000 Avid 900. 
Furthermore, animators rave about Media 
100's real-time rendering capability. 

However, the program is a little cumber- 
some in its advanced applications. Patrick 
Seimer of Chicago's H-Gun Media Labs sums 
up the general feeling that the Media 100 is 
somehow "less elegant to drive than the 
Avid." The difference between the two is most 
often described in organic terms. The Avid 
software is currently the sixth version of the 
original (Avid 900 v6.0). The Media 100 is in 
its second incarnation (Media 100 v2.0). 
With a four-generation head start, the Avid 
has had some time to grow into itself and 
become comfortable following some compli- 
cated commands. By contrast, the Media 100 
is a young program and lacks a certain refined 
grace under fire. 

In response to these mild criticisms from 
high-end users, Data Translation recently 
released version 2.5 of the Media 100 soft- 
ware. The upgrade is more supple than ver- 
sion 2.0 and has incorporated real-time color 
effects that are great fun but still require an 
animator's level of patience to fine-tune 
beyond the presets. Perhaps the best thing 
about the new version is what it says about the 
manufacturer. Data Translation listened to 
customer complaints, then went out and 
made some, il not all, ot the appropriate 
changes. It you spend $},000 on their 
Platinum Technical Support Deal, version 2.5 
and all subsequent upgrades are free. 

The Hardware 

As glowing .is the review of rhi- software is, 
the system environment on which it runs is 
still a bit murky. Just nine months after Data 
Translation released Version 2.0 of the Media 



100, Apple replaced the Power Macintosh 
(PM) 8100 with three newer, faster models. 
Unfortunately, the Media 100 boards that fit in 
the 8100 won't work in the new machines. 

A dilemma for consumers, there is nonethe- 
less a good reason for the change in configura- 
tions: a computer is only as fast as its slowest 
component. In the case of the first generation 
of Power Macs and the Quadra line of 68040 
machines, the bottleneck lies in the Nubus 
architecture of the expansion slots holding the 
boards that digitize video and audio and drive 
the Media 100 software. Nubus is based on 
technology implemented in 1990 and allows 
information to enter the machine in 32-bit 
chunks. While these chunks enter the machine 
at well nigh the speed of light, the width of 
these chunks determines the quality of the 
input. The PCI system, which replaced Nubus 
in the Power Mac 7500, 8500, and 9500, fea- 
tures a 64-bit architecture. Wider chunks of 
picture information can move through the 
machine at a given point in time. The 7500, 
8500, and 9500 are priced according to speed, 
so you get what you pay for. 

Data Translation has chosen to deal with 
this situation by offering a version of the Media 
100 for both Nubus and PCI architectures. 
Both versions are available as incremental 
modules that range in price from $9,000 for the 
entry level system to $24,000 for the whole - 
deal package, with the ability to input and out- 
put component video. This upgradeable system 
has also been devised to function with variable 
amounts of RAM and hard drive space. A 
decent Power Mac 8100- or 7500-based entry 
level system will set you back between $8,500 
and $9,000 for the hardware (with 48 megs of 
RAM and a four to five gigabyte 7200 spin 
hard-drive) and video support (NTSC monitor 
and speakers). The same system on a Power 
Mac 8500 and 9500 runs about $1,000 and 
$2,000 more, respectively, but to take full 
advantage of the increased speed, you need to 
increase your RAM to 80 megs (another 
$1,000) and get an eight to 10 gigabyte disk 
array. (A collection of hard drives thai the 
computer thinks is one drive will cost about 
$6,000.) 

Alternatives to official Macintosh hardware 
are available, now that Apple has licensed its 
operating system to other manufacturers. As oi 
this writing, Power Computing, Prism 
Technology, and Radius are offering mail-order- 
only clones ot the 8100 thai can he customized 
as platforms tor the Media 100. More choices 
will surely follow. It they live up to then specs, 




fejAfiwstj FILM 
SCHOOL 



with Dov S-S Simens 



LOS ANGELES: 
Dec 2-3 or Feb 3-4 

WORLDTOUR 



MELBOURNE Jan 13-14 
SYDNEY: Jan 20-21 
SAN FRANQSCa Feb 10-11 
LONDON: Feb 17-18 
SEATTLE: Feb 24-25 
DENVER: Mar2-3 

NEW YORK Mar 9-10 
PHOENIX: Mar 15-17 

Call for additional dates 



If you haven r Directed, Produced 
or Distributed an independent 
feature film... 
...You haven't taken this course! 

Can't Attend? Can't Wait? 
Audio Tapes Available 



CYBERSPACE FILM SCHOOL™ 
http^/www.hollywoodu.com/Mi/ 



HR, P0 Box 481252, LA, CA 90048 



800-366-3456 



only 

$289 

HoarwooB 

W 

INSTITUTE 



CAMERAMAN WITH 
SONY BETACAM SP* 

595. 

A DAY 

2000 FOR A WEEK 

Test Spots-Interviews- Anything 
INCLUDES 

ARRI HMI'S, MOLE TUNGSTEN 2K's, IK'S. 
SENNHEISER SHOTGUN MICS, WIRELESS 
COMPLETE GRIP, C-STAND, FLAGS, NETS 

CALL INTERMITTENT PICTURES 

203.254.7370 

*OrArri16mm camera with Nagra 
D-Vision Nonlinear Editing also! 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 57 



»i€»WI9S« SI»1?CIAI, 





Our Thanks To AIVF Members 

Receive 20% off all services 

FOR THE MONTHS OF JANUARY & FEBRUARY 1 996 



on track video 

1 04 W. 29th St., 1 2th Floor (21 2)645-2040 



Micro-Finder! 



The Ultra Compact Director's Viewfinder 

Just $299.00! 

Special introductory offer. 




Specifications, 
Range mm: 
*f§mffl 
35mm 

Ariamorphic 
JL23" Video 
1" Video 



8.5 to 47mm 
18 to 100mm 
36 to 200mm 
7.3 to 40mm 
10 to 58mm 



MKA is proud to introduce the first affordable high 
quality director's finder, the Micro Finder. The Micro 
Finder features solid aluminum construction, coated 
glass optics, and compact design. Unlike most directors 
finders which are large and bulky the Micro Finder can 
be worn all day without neck strain. The Micro Find] 
offers the most commonly used focal lengths for bo 
16mm, 35mm, 35mm anamorphic, and video use in a 1 
variety of aspect ratios - 1.33, 1.66, 1.85,2.35. Each 
finder comes with four drop in masks, strap, padded 
carry case, and six month warranty. 

Motion Tel 212-219-8408 

SLn. Fax 212-219-8953 




m\M 



106 Franklin St. #2 
New York, NY 10013 




SONY 



BerACAMElJi 



212-714-3550 
292 5th Ave, 4th fl. 



A/E3 Roll $55/hr 

Straight cuts $75/hr 

Window dubs/transfers 

Auto conform from CMX EPL's 

MEDIA Macintosh 

^T^^P"" b a s e d nonlinear 

1 I I I I editing system 

$1000/wk includes 

9 gigabyte hard drive 

PAT storage backup 

Photoshop/Cosa After Effects 



all three would be a improvement on the PM 
8100, but due to the inherent limitatios of 
Nubus architecture, they probably won't be as 
versatile or as fast as the 8500 or 9500. 

Low Cost Little Brother 

Just as this article was going to press, Data 
Translation announced plans to bundle their 
custom PCI Video Card, the Vincent, with 
Adobe Premier 4-2 for under $5,000. This 
low- cost introduction to digital video will be 
named Media 100 qx and will be the first PCI 
device designed for Quicktime users. Premier 
is not great software compared to the Avid, 
Media 100, or even Cosa After Effects. 
However, running out of the same card that 
drives the Media 100 on a PCI machine, it 
should provide the same high quality video 
and audio that put Media 100 on the map 
with a reasonable rendering speed. Since it is 
untested, the strongest praise I can give for 
the product is that it contains the exact same 
board that works so well with the Media 100. 
Also, Data Translation will offer a software- 
only upgrade path to the Media 100 that 
makes the Vincent-Premier bundle worth 
consideration sight unseen. 

Endnote 

The Media 100 v2.0 and the recently 
released v2.5 are both great cost-effective 
nonlinear digital editing systems for the 
Power Mac. The young, robust software is 
perhaps a bit inelegant for the most sophisti- 
cated users, but the proprietary digitizing 
hardware delivers unrivaled picture quality in 
real-time. The current versions are both 
native to the Power Mac, and the improve- 
ments in the recent upgrade should make it 
more attractive to high- end users. 
Furthermore, the commonsense solutions, 
candor, and superb technical support offered 
by Data Translations suggest that the 
advanced operating features will continue to 
improve with subsequent software upgrades. 
Given the speed advantages of PCI over 
Nubus, the second generations of Power 
Macs are worth the additional expense to 
anyone intending to expand their nonlinear 
editing system as this technology evolves, 
even if it means upgrading the modular 
Media 100 package in stages rather than buy- 
ing the complete system as one piece. 

Rob Rownd (rhrjr@delphi.com) is a writer and film- 
maker living in Chicago. 



58 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



Cue&A 

^X^itH Jonathan 
Stack 



The lives of a number of Harlem youths are inti- 
mately portrayed in Jonathan Stack's Harlem 
Diary: Nine Voices of Resilience (35 mm, 96 

min.). The filmmaker, a one-time Harlem resi- 
dent, was inspired by the work of sociologist Terry 
Williams, who had a group of Harlem kids docu- 
ment their experiences in personal journals, subse- 
quently published in his book The Uptown Kids: 
Struggle and Hope in the Projects. Joining up 
with Williams, Stack chose to expand on this work 
by putting video cameras in the hands of the sub- 
jects and allowing them to directly articulate the 
ways in which they liad met the challenges of grow- 
ing up in Harlem. Stack, the producer of the 
Emmy-award winning documentary on censorship 
Damned in the USA, was fortunate enough to 
land a production agreement with the Discovery 
Channel for this project, his first as director. The 
film will air on the channel on February 27, fol- 
lowing a theatrical release. 

Harlem Diary, Jonathan Stack, Gabriel Films, 
457 Washington St., New York, NY 10013; (212) 
941-6200, fax (212) 941-6203. 

Q: How did the Discovery Channel come to be 
involved with the Harlem Diary project? 

A: Discovery president Greg Moyer was inter- 
ested in setting up some informal meetings to 
build relationships with independent filmmak- 
ers. Janet Carlson, Discovery's director of 
acquisitions and development, contacted me 
because we'd worked together previously at the 
Margaret Mead Film Festival. Moyer met with 
Terry Williams and me for dinner one evening, 
and the offer of support came immediately; the 
project was greenlit, in principle, by the end of 
the meal. 

Q: What kind of support did the Discovery 
Channel give you.' 

A: It was exactly what you would hope for: For 
someone to believe in you and give you the 
resources to realize your dream as best you are 
able. It there are any problems with Harlem 
Diary, I can only blame myself, because I bad 
complete control over the project. They sup- 
ported and encouraged the kind of work I was 
doing, even though it took considerably longer 




than a normal television production schedule per- 
mits; they allowed us more than two years, 
because we needed that time, and they had made 
the commitment to support our work. 

Q: What kind of funding did Discovery give you, 
and what kind of control did you have over the 
budget? 

A: I can't divulge the specific dollar amount ol the 
budget, but it was a good level of funding for this 
kind of film. It's not like there's endless amounts 
of money, but they were quite flexible. So much of 
this has to do with the relationship you develop 
with the sponsor: If they trust you, you have more 
freedom. They trusted I was doing all I could, so 
nobody was on me about any wrong choices I 
made. The key was to deliver, which I did. 

Q: Did you retain control over the final cut? 

A: This is bizarre: The only restriction was in 
length, but that's always the case. In terms of the 
creative aspects, I was ultimately responsible tor 
every point. I don't know it I'll ever have a situa- 



tion like that again. It was so terrific it's almost 
strange. This was the first film I'd ever directed, 
and on a documentary especially there are so 
many unpredictable variables. That makes it all 
very exciting, but to do your best work you need 
the freedom to make mistakes and the flexibility to 
take risks. In this case I was lucky — I'd even say 
blessed — to have that. 

Q: What kind of theatrical release terms did 
Discovery give you? 

A: Harlem Diary was initially conceived as a tele- 
vision project, so a theatrical release was not our 
first impulse. But when they realized how the film 
truly mattered, how it could be used as a tool to 
help the community, they agreed with me that it 
would be worthwhile to create a film print for the- 
atrical release. They went out of their way for this 
extra step, setting up a Los Angeles premiere 
screening to benefit a South Central L.A. teen 
leadership organization. 

Q: How else have they worked to get the film into 
the community? 

A: After a premiere at the Apollo Theater in 
Harlem, the film has continued to play at the 
Victoria there. We've also started showing the film 
at halfway houses, community centers, and 
schools with some of the participants present, and 
the reception has been terrific, uplifting. You can 
see that there's a real use for it. Discovery is also 
licensing rights back to me for future screenings at 
schools and other community venues, so the film 
will be able to go beyond just showing on televi- 
sion, which can be frustrating. 

Q: Were you able to retain copyright control? 

A: No. I think it'll become harder and harder to 
retain rights, because there's a new understanding 
that recorded images have potential long-term 
value, and that's where the profit may lie. As long 
as you want to get someone to fund your project, 
it may be tough to hold on to the rights. 

Q: What suggestions do you have lor filmmakers 
considering similar kinds ol funding? 

A: Don't simply assume a given network is not 
into what you want to do. Try it out on them, 
because it just might interest them. At least let 
them say no; don't let your perception ol the cir- 

cumstances limit your options. In any event, you 
will need to be patient and persistent, because il 

takes a long time. 

— Adam Knee 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 59 




listings do not constitute an endorsement, 
since some details may change after the maga- 
zine goes to press, we recommend that you 
contact the festival directly before sending 
preview cassettes. deadline for submitting a 
call for entries in the festival column is the 
1st of the month two months prior to cover 
date (e.g., jan. 1 for march issue). all blurbs 
should include: festival dates, categories, 
prizes, entry fees, deadlines, formats & con- 
tact info. to improve our reliability and make 
this column more beneficial, we encourage 
all mediamakers to contact fivf with changes, 
criticism, or praise for festivals profiled. 

Domestic 

ANN ARBOR FILM FESTIVAL, March 1247, 
MI. All cats & genres in ind. filmmaking are eligible 
for 34th edition of Ann Arbor: doc, animation, 
experimental, narrative. $9,000 in cash prizes award- 
ed. Awarded films & highlights are programmed into 
4 hr program that tours colleges & film showplaces 
across U.S. for 4 mos. following fest, w/ rental fee of 
$l/min. per tour stop. Entry fee: $32. Format: 16mm 
(no video accepted for prescreening) . Deadline; Feb. 
15. Contact: Ann Arbor Film Festival, Box 8232, 
Ann Arbor, MI 48107; (313) 995-5356; fax: 5396; e- 
mail: vicki@honeyman.org. 

ASIAN AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL FILM 
FESTIVAL, June, NY. Sponsored by Asian 
Cine Vision, NYC-based nat'l media arts center, this 
noncompetitive fest, created in 1977, is country's 
oldest showcase for works by Asian & Asian 
American filmmakers. Fest seeks to heighten under- 
standing & appreciation of Asian 6k Asian American 
cinema art. After its NY premiere, fest embarks on 
10-month tour of N. America. Films produced, 
directed 6k/or written by artists of Asian heritage eli- 
gible. Features & shorts in all cats accepted. Entries 
must have been originally produced on film; no 
. video-to-film transfers accepted. Formats accepted: 
35mm, 16mm; preview on cassette. Entry fee: none. 
Deadline: early March. Contact: Festival Director, 
Asian American International Film Festival, Asian 
Cine Vision, 32 East Broadway, 4th fl., New York, NY 
10002; (212) 925-8685; fax: 8157. 

ATHENS INTERNATIONAL FILM & VIDEO 
FESTIVAL, April 26-May 2, OH. 23rd edition of 
fest focuses on ind. film & video. Fest looks for works 
"that evidence a high regard for artistic innovation, 
sensitivity to content & personal involvement with 



the medium." Entries prescreened by committee 
comprised of filmmakers, videomakers & other 
artists associated w/ Athens Center for Film & 
Video. Cash prizes awarded to competition winners 
in each cat; cats incl narrative (traditional 6k exper- 
imental), doc (traditional 6k experimental), experi- 
mental 6k animation. Entry fee: $25 plus pre-paid 
return shipping/insurance. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 
3/4", 1/2".. Deadline: Jan. 12. Contact: Athens 
International Film 6k Video Fesetival, Athens Center 
for Film 6k Video, Box 388, Athens, OH 45701; 
(614) 593-1330; fax: (614) 593-1328; e-mail: 
rbradleyl@ohiou.edu. 

BIG MUDDY FILM AND VIDEO FESTIVAL, 

late Feb./early March, IL. Founded in 1978, this 
competitive fest for ind. film 6k video is organized 6k 
run by students 6k provides ind. film/videomakers w/ 
opportunity to present works "that challenge tradi- 
tional boundaries of visual media." 3 ind. filmmakers 
present their works 6k serve as judges, awarding 
$3,000 in cash prizes. Approx 70 entries (chosen 
from annual entries of 200-280) are in official com- 
petition. Entries must have been completed after 
Dec. of preceding 2 yrs. Special community outreach 
program incl. screenings at detention centers, nurs- 
ing homes, women's shelters, schools, etc. Formats 
accepted: 16mm, 3/4", 1/2". Entry fee: $30-40. 
Deadline: early Feb. Contact: Fest Director, Big 
Muddy Film and Video Festival, Dept. of Cinema 6k 
Photography, Mailcode 6610, Southern Illinois 
University, Carbondale, IL 62901; (618) 453-1482; 
fax: (618) 453-1005. 

CAROLINA FILM AND VIDEO FESTIVAL, 

April 3-6, NC. Held at U of North Carolina, fest, 
now in its 6th yr, has goal of showcasing best student 
6k ind. film and video in all genres, incl. animation, 
doc, experimental 6k narrative, as well as works that 
cross cat boundaries. Last yr, 49 works were screened 
in competition. This yr's awards expected to match 
or exceed $2,500 in cash and Kodak filmstock. A 
non-refundable handling fee of $20 for students and 
$30 for independents required per entry. To receive 
full consideration, entry form, work 6k fee must be 
received no later than Feb 15. Formats: 16mm, 3/4", 
1/2". Contact: Shane Nye, Carolina Film and Video 
Festival, Broadcasting/Cinema Program, 100 
Carmichael Building, UNCG, Greensboro, NC 
27412-5001; (910) 334-5360; fax: (910) 334-5039. 

CHARLOTTE FILM AND VIDEO FESTIVAL, 

May, NC. Competitive fest "seeks to foster 6k 
encourage art of ind. film & video makers, especially 
those with unique point of view." Ind film 6k video- 
makers working in US eligible for fest, which awards 
$7,000 in cash prizes About 50 works (9% of the 
entries) are screened, 6k all accepted work is paid 
cash. Features 6k shorts completed since Jan. 1 of 
previous 3 yrs accepted. Cats: doc, narrative, experi- 
mental 6k animated. Exhibition sites incl. Mint 
Museum of Art, Spirit Square Center for Arts 6k 
Education, Afro-American Cultural Center, Public 
Library of Charlotte 6k Mecklenburg County, the 
Light Factory Photographic Arts Center 6k the 
Manor Theater. Choice Cuts, traveling exhibit of 
work selected from fest, goes to selected venues in 
US; filmmakers whose work is chosen receive rental 



By Kathryn Bowser 

fees for each additional screening. Formats : 35mm, 
16mm, 3/4", 1/2", Beta, CD-ROM. Entry fee: $30. 
Deadline: early March. Contact: Robert West, 
director, Charlotte Film 6k Video Festival, Mint 
Museum of Art, 2730 Randolph Road, Charlotte, 
NC 28207; (704) 337-2019; fax: (704) 337-2101; e- 
mail: mintfilm@aol.com. 

CINE ANNUAL GOLDEN EAGLE FILM AND 
VIDEO COMPETITION, August, DC. CINE 
competition for nontheatrical films 6k videos 
(except TV ads 6k spot announcements) now enter- 
ing 36th yr. Golden Eagles awarded in amateur, agri- 
culture, economic development, animation, chil- 
dren's films, art, business/industry, doc, education, 
entertainment, shorts, feature (made for TV), 
music, environment, history, medicine, motivation- 
al, news, people, public affairs, public health, sci- 
ence, sports 6k travel cats. Entries must be U.S. pro- 
ductions. Award winners entered in foreign festivals 
6k also eligible for Academy Awards nominations. 
Entries judged by various juries comprising over 700 
film/video professionals. Entrants should send appli- 
cation and entry fee first and send tapes when 
instructed. Formats accepted: 1/2". Entry fee: $45- 
75 amateur/$100+ professional. Deadline: early 
Feb. Contact: Joy Parisi, director, CINE 
Competition, CINE-Council on International Non- 
Theatrical Events, 1001 Connecticut Avenue, NW, 
ste. 638, Washington, DC 20036; (202) 785-1136; 
fax: 4114. 

FIRSTGLANCE 2: PHILADELPHIA INDE- 
PENDENT FILM & VIDEO FESTIVAL, March, 
PA. Fest billed as "Philadelphia's original under- 
ground festival" is in 2nd yr. Mission is "to bring 
together the best 6k brightest young film 6k video 
makers to exhibit their work to the community in a 
festival atmosphere." Fest is 5-day multiple venue 
event; highlights incl. student film competition 
judged by TV 6k film professionals, gala 1st night 
benefit. Cats incl. doc, narrative, animation, music 
video 6k experimental; 10 sec- to feature-length 
works accepted. Contact: Sharon Pinkenson, 
Firstglance 2, Greater Philadelphia Film Office, 
1600 Arch St., 12th Fl., Philadelphia, PA 19103; 
(215) 686-2668; fax: (215) 686-3659. 

FLORDDA FDLM FESTIVAL, June, FL. 10 day 
event featuring American ind. films (feature, short, 
doc, narrative, experimental, animation), seminars, 
Florida student competition, celebrations 6k special 
guests. Held at Enzian Theatre, major ind. nonprof- 
it cinema 6k media arts center, fest has evolved from 
exhibition- only fest to juried competition. In each 
cat there is Jury Award, Audience Award 6k 1 other 
award at jury's discretion. Entries must have at least 
51% US funding. Features must be 60 min. or more; 
shorts under 10 min. Video accepted for animation 
6k student competition only. Fest also sponsors sev- 
eral curated sidebars, special events, seminars, 
workshops 6k receptions. Formats accepted: 35mm, 
16mm. Entry fee: $15-$30. Deadline: early March. 
Contact: Sigrid Tiedtke, executive director, Florida 
Film Festival, Enzian Theatre, 1300 S. Orlando 
Avenue, Maitland, FL 32571; (407) 629-1068; fax: 
6870; 
e-mail: filmfesti@gate.net. WWW: http://www. 



60 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



magicnet.net/enzian/. 

HOMETOWN VIDEO FESTIVAL, July, CA. 
Sponsored by Alliance for Community Media (for- 
merly National Federation of Local Cable 
Programmers), a national, nonprofit membership 
organization committed to assuring access to elec- 
tronic media, this competitive fest, begun in 1977, 
recognizes outstanding local program produced 
for/by local orgs & PEG access operations. In 1995, 
fest received over 1,750 entries from US & Canada. 
Awards: 4 special awards for overall excellence in 
PEG local origination programming; finalists, hon- 
orable mentions & winners in 36 categories. Some 
cats: performing arts; ethnic expression; entertain- 
ment; sports; by/for youth; live; municipal; reli- 
gious; educational; instructional/training; informa- 
tional; innovative; international; by/for senior citi- 
zens; PSA; doc; profile/event/public awareness; 
video art; music video; local news; magazine for- 
mat; original teleplay. Entries must have been pro- 
duced vil in previous yr. Awards ceremony held dur- 
ing Int'l Conference Trade Show of Alliance for 
Community Media. Formats accepted: 3/4", 1/2". 
Entry fee: $20-$50. Contact: Randy Van Dalsen, 
Hometown Video Festival, The Buske Group, 3001 
\) Street, Ste 201, Sacramento, CA 95816; (916) 
441-6277; fax: 7670. 

HOUSTON INTERNATIONAL FILM AND 
VIDEO FESTIVAL/WORLDFESTHOUSTON, 

April, TX. Large fest vil many competition cats. 
New Remi Award is the Grand Prize of Worldfest, 
going to top festival winners. Associated film & 
video market for features, shorts, doc, video 
ind./experimental & TV productions ($300 entry 
fee). Student Awards Program offers $2,500 cash 
award for grand prize &. $500 cash award for best 
student film in each cat of high school, college & 
graduate. Scripts &. screenplays also have competi- 
tion cat. Cats: theatrical features (animated, doc, 
comedy, dramatic, fantasy/horror, first feature, for- 
eign, ind., low budget, major studio/distributor, out 
of competition, feature made for tape/cable 
release); TV & Video Production (animated, analy- 
sis/background of single current news story, contin- 
uing news story coverage, feature made for TV, 
individual on camera talent, ind. video, cul- 
tural/historical information segment or program, 
interviews, investigative journalism, local public 
service, local TV programming, news and doc pro- 
gram-directing, editing/graphics, videography, 
research/writing, pilots, program/individual/techni- 
cal achievements, public affairs, religious, TV series 
&. specials); Film & Video Production (advertising, 
agriculture, arts/culture, biographical/autobio- 
graphical, children's corporate image/orientation, 
doc, ecology/environment/conservation, educa- 
tional children 6k adult, ethnic/cultural, flight/ 
space travel, fundraising, instructional, history/ 
archaeology, human sexuality, industrial/technical, 
inhouse productions, insurance, leisure/recreation, 
medical/ health/fitness, substance abuse, medical, 
motivational, nature/wildlife, nuclear/energy issues, 
performance arts, political/international issues, 
public relations, public service, public health, 
reuniting/career guidance, religion/ethics, safety 
first aid, sailing/watesports, sales/marketing, scien- 
tific/research, social/economic issues, sports, travel, 
training, underwater/marine science, women's 




IMAGE 
LIBRARY 



"" 



£ 



Images for Great Ideas 



Largest collection of original film 

available for licensing in all formats 

and subjects. FREE CATALOG. 

Order your CD-ROM today. 

1-800-IMAGERY 

! EAST COAST: 212/686-4900 fax 212/686-4998 

J WEST COAST: 818-508-1444 fax 818-508-1293 

Energy Productions, 404 Park Avenue South, Suite 1 304, New York, NY 1 001 6 



No budget for the "Big Houses"? 

R,G, Mdeo offers iiigh production value 

to independent projects 

without compromising the quality. 

-.'>- Avid on-line, off-line 

bigitmjirw VHS 

>~ Interformat on-line editing 

w/2 eh. Abefa0?&4%iialefficts, Chyron iNFiNiT! 

>r Duplication services availably l$r all format! 

>^ Beta SP/Hi-8 camera packages 

Ikegami HL-S5A Beta SP, Canon LI '-A Hi-8 

w/orw/ocrew 

••• Call for deiriid reel 




R. G. Video 

21 W. 46th Street 

New York, NY 10036 

Tel: (212) 997-1464, Fax: (212) 827-0426 



Non-Linear ^^ Prd-Tddls III 

Editing .m^^. Sound Editing 
$75D/week >^ ^ & Mixing 
Film & Video ^^m*r^^ Scoring 

DFF-LINE - DN-LlNE ^^^^ SYNCHING 

AVID - DVision Pro 
Rental and Sales 


Cyclops Pictures 

(2 1 2) 533-0330 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 61 




tl Beta On-Line 



AVID 



mi 



A IV/lUlVij 



666 Broadway New York City 

212-982-1101 

■■■■.■■:■■■■■ ■:■■■ ; ■ ■■■ ■ ............... ........ . ■ . ■ _ ..... ...................... 

Hi-8 Component Transfers 




OFF-LINE 
AVID 4000 
SONY 3/4" 
DUPLICATION 

G6NIX 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK, 10012 
FAX 212 941 5759 





Video 


Rentals 


Location 


packages 


j 


BetaSP/Hi8mm/Audio/Lighting/Crew or rental 


Editing 






S-VHS location rentals or on-site 


Reasonable rates 




Great packages 






212 


260 7748 



issues); short subjects films & videos; TV commer- 
cials; experimental films & videos; 
filmstrips/slide/multimedia programs; student films 
& videos; super 8mm film & videos; screenplays; 
music videos; new media; print advertising awards; 
radio advertising awards.. Formats accepted: 
35mm, 16mm, 3/4", 1/2", super 8 (on videotape). 
Entry fee: $50-$200. Deadline: early March. 
Contact: J. Hunter Todd, festival director, Houston 
International Film and Video Festival/Worldfest- 
Houston, Box 56566, Houston, TX 77256; (713) 
965-9955/(800) 524-1438; fax: (713) 965-9960. 

IMAGES ON THE CAPE FEAR, March 22-23, 
NC. Fest shows work on 35mm, 16mm, super 8 & 
video. Entry fee: $10. Deadline: Feb. 23. Contact: 
Twinkle Doon, 4326 Market St., ste. 174, 
Wilmington, NC 28403; (910) 251-7667. 

MIDWEST INTERNATIONAL DOCUMEN- 
TARY FESTIVAL, April, IL. 2nd edition of juried 
fest which seeks to bring the art of doc filmmaking 
to wider audience. Fest co-sponsored by Columbia 
College 6k IDA 6k includes screenings 6k panel dis- 
cussions. Certificates of Merit awarded; student 
entries encouraged. Entry fee: $10. Formats: Hi8, 
3/4", 1/2". Deadline: Feb. 15. Contact: Midwest 
International Documentary Festival, c/o Docu- 
mentary Festival, 600 S. Michigan, Chicago, IL 
60605; (312) 663-1600 x5306 or x5788. 

I MONITOR AWARDS, October, NY. Sponsored 
by Int'l Teleproduction Society, this competition 
honors excellence in electronic production 6k post- 
production. Cats 6k craft areas incl TV series; TV 
specials; theatrical releases; music video; national 
commercials; local commercials; promotions; chil- 
dren's programming; sports; docs; short subjects; 
show reels; corporate communication; opens, clos- 
es and titles; transitions; logos 6k IDs. Awards: best 
achievement honors to producers, directors, edi- 
tors, etc. in each cat. Entries must have been pro- 
duced or postproduced w/in previous calendar yr 6k 
entries originating on film must be postproduced 
electronically. Formats accepted: 3/4". Entry fee: 
$130-$170. Deadline: Early Feb. Contact: Julia 
Hammer, International Monitor Awards, 350 5th 
Avenue, Ste. 2400, New York, NY 10118; (212) 

1 629-3266; fax: 3265. 

NATIVE AMERICAN FILM AND VIDEO 
FESTIVAL, April, NY. Showcases best new ind, 
doc 6k animated works produced by 6k about 
Native Americans 6k Native Hawaiians. 1995 festi- 
val featured film, video and radio works produced 
since 1992 from North, Central and Latin America 
6k Hawaii. Formats accepted: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4"; 
preview on cassette. Entry fee: none. Deadline: 
early March. Contact: Erica C. Wortha'm, Native 
American Film and Video Festival, Film and Video 
Center of the National Museum of the American 
Indian, George Gustav Heye Center, One Bowling 
Green, New York, NY 10004; (212) 825-6894; fax: 
8180. 

NEW YORK VIDEO FESTIVAL, July, NY. 
Noncompetitive fest aims to present latest in elec- 
tronic arts. Over past yrs, High Definition TV 6k 
CD-ROM work have been presented in addition to 
video. Originally presented as a special event of the 
New York Film Festival since 1992, this year an ind. 



62 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



project that will take place in conjunction w/ 
Lincoln Center Festival '96. All videos shown single 
channel, projected in Film Society's 268 seat Walter 
Reade Theater at Lincoln Center. No cats/no 
awards. Average of 44 works presented in 14 pro- 
grams 6k over 3,600 attend. There is coverage in the 
New York Times and the Village Voice, and some out- 
of-town and international coverage. Submitted 
works should be recent (w/in past 2 years) ; NY pre- 
mieres preferred but not required. Formats accept- 
ed: 3/4", 1/2", Beta, CD-ROM, HDTV; preview on 
3/4", 1/2", CD-ROM. Entry fee: none. Deadline: 
early March. Contact: Marian Masone, Film Society 
of Lincoln Center, 70 Lincoln Center Plaza, New 
York, NY 10023; (212) 875-5610; fax: 5636; e-mail: 
masonem@aol.com. 

RETIREMENT RESEARCH FOUNDATION 
NATIONAL MEDIA OWL AWARDS, May 15, 

IL. Competitive fest for outstanding films, video & 
TV series "that address aging issues, capture images 
of older persons 6k illuminate challenge 6k promise 
of an aging society." Entries must deal w/ concerns 
of aged or those workin in field. Cats: ind. films, TV 
nonfiction 6k training/educational awards: 1st prize 
$5,000, bronze statuette; 2nd prize $2,000 6k 
plaque; honorable mentions $1,000 6k plaques; 
community video award (TV nonfiction only) 
$2,000 6k statuette. Entries must have been pro- 
duced in US 6k released or initially copyrighted dur- 
ing 1995. No entry fee. Deadline: Feb. 1. Contact: 
Ray Bradford, project director, National Media Owl 
Awards, Retirement Research Foundation, 1440 N. 
Dayton St., Chicago, IL 60622; (312) 951-0678; 
fax: 5717. 

RIVERTOWN INTERNATIONAL FILM FES- 
TIVAL, April, MN. Estab. in 1983, this non-com- 
petitive fest of fests, sponsored by Univ. of 
Minnesota Film Society/Minnesota Film Center, 
annually presents more than 100 feature films from 
over 35 countries, as well as number of shorts. 
Programs held at various venues throughout Twin 
Cities. Fest now largest fest in Upper-Midwest 
region. Program incl features, selected shorts or fea- 
turettes, contemporary int'l films, US ind. film work 
(incl. Emerging Filmmakers jury competition 6k 
Screenwriters Workshops); different nat'l cinema 
each yr 6k commercial features for opening 6k clos- 
ing. Schedule incl. some US premieres 6k occasion- 
al world premieres, as well as largest group of 
Scandinavian film titles in any US fest 6k showcas- 
es focus on films from Eastern European countries. 
Votes cast for "Best of Fest" in several cats, incl. fea- 
ture, short 6k doc; winners are based on audience 
poll. Limited funds available for transportation 6k 
accommodations of directors. World Wide Web: 
http://wvvvv.umn.edu/nlhome/g02 3/filmsoc/ 
ufilm.html. Formats accepted: 35mm, 16mm. Entry 
fee: $30. Deadline: mid-Feb. Contact: Al Milgrom, 
test director/Boh Strong, fest coordinator, 
Riveitown International Film Festival, University of 
Minnesota Film Society, Minnesota Film Center, 
425 Ontario Street, SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; 
(612) 627-4431; tax: 1111; e-mail: filmsoc@go!d. 
tc.umn.edu. 

ROCHESTER INTERNATIONAL FILM FES- 
TIVAL, May, NY. Sponsored by Movies on a 
Shoestring group ol western New York film buffs, 



fest was founded in 1959 6k is open to films 6k videos 
of all genres. Out of about 140 entries each year, fest 
programs 24 entries (8 screenings a night). Entries 
should be under 40 min. Awards incl. Certificates of 
Merit, Honorable Mentions 6k Shoestring Trophy. 
Held at the International Museum of Film 6k 
Photography in Rochester. Selected films from each 
year's festival bought for nonprofit traveling collec- 
tion "Best of Festival" program, which travels New 
York State. Formats accepted: 16mm, super 8, 1/2". 
Entry fee: $20. Deadline: early March. Contact: 
Josephine Perini, Rochester International Film 
Festival, Movies on a Shoestring, Inc., PO Box 
17746, Rochester, NY 14617; (716) 288-5607. 

SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL LES- 
BIAN AND GAY FILM AND VIDEO FESTI- 
VAL, June, CA. Founded in 1976, this is one of 
world's largest 6k oldest events of its kind, "commit- 
ted to showcasing the best 6k most diverse work by or 
about lesbians 6k gay men." Many works premiered in 
fest go on to be programmed or distributed national- 
ly 6k internationally. In prescreening process, 3 ind, 
diverse screening committees review submissions 
from Nov.-March, accepting works at ratio of 1:3. 
Rough cuts 6k working versions of unfinished work 
accepted for preview if submitted on 3/4" or 1/2". 
Festival especially encourages applications from 
women 6k people of color. Entries must be San 
Francisco Bay Area premieres. Awards: Frameline 
Award, Audience Award, Absolut Auteur Award. 
Fest produced by Frameline, nonprofit arts organiza- 
tion dedicated to exhibition, distribution, funding 6k 
promotion of lesbian 6k gay media arts. Formats 
accepted: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4", 1/2", multimedia, 
installations. Entry fee: $20. Deadline: late Feb. 
Contact: Boone Nguyen, director of programming, 
San Francisco International Lesbian 6k Gay Film 6k 
Video Festival, Frameline, 346 Ninth Street, San 
Francisco, CA 94103; (415) 703-8658; fax: (415) 
861-1404. 

SEATTLE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, 

Mid May/Early June, WA. Founded in 1974, fest is 1 
of largest non-competitive festivals in US, presenting 
more than 160 features 6k 75 short films to audience 
of over 100,000 filmgoers each yr. Known for its 
eclectic programming which encompasses all genres 
6k styles from latest in contemporary world cinema to 
premieres of American ind. 6k major studio releases. 
Special programs include New Directors Film 
Showcase, Independent Filmmakers Forum, Golden 
Space Needle Awards given in cats of feature film, 
director, actress, actor, doc 6k short story. 
Presentation at fest qualifies participants for entry in 
Independent Feature Project's Independent Spirit 
Awards. Formats accepted: 35mm, 16mm; preview 
on 1/2". Deadline: early March. Contact: Carl 
Spence, Seattle International Film Festival, Egyptian 
Theater, 801 E. Pine Street, Seattle, WA 98122; 
(206) 324-9996; fax: 9998; e-mail: cinemaseattle^ 
film.com. 

SILVER IMAGES FILM FESTIVAL, May 16-18, 
IL. This fest, now in its 3rd edition, programs selec- 
tion of best int'l 6k US films 6k videos — narrative, 
doc, experimental — that "honor and celebrate the 
lives ><f older adults." Filmmakers of all ages encour- 
aged to enter work; fest especially encourages film- 
makers 65 and older to enter (these films do not nee- 



mfA 



NON-LINEAR 

EDITING 



MEDIA 100 SYSTEM 

• True broadcast-quality 

• "Off-line" and "On-line" with 
"All-On-One"™ mastering 

• Multi-track, 16-bit, 44.1kHz 
(CD-quality) audio mixing 

• CG, Color FX, Motion FX 

• BetaS P Deck 



PLUS... 

ANIMATED 
GRAPHICS, 
KEYS& 
COMPOSING 



Adobe 




AFfER 
EFFECTS] 




INC. 



(212)226-1152 

• COMPETETIVE RATES 

• CALL FOR FREE CONSULTATION 



^Vf$A I^^^^SI 



PASS 

Digital Audio 

for 

Video/Film 



16*track Lock to 
Betacam SP & 3/4" 



COMPOSER REFERRAL 



ADR. Foley. SFX, Mixing, ADAT, 

Time Code DAT. MIDI, Soundtools. 

DINR-- Digidesign Intelligent Noise 

Reduction, Protools 3.1 

LOW RATES/GREAT ENGINEERS 



Studio PASS 


a program of 


HARVESTWORKS 


5 96 


Broad 


way, #602 


NYC 


10012 


212-431-1 1 30 



Call for class brochure! 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 63 



essarily have to concern aging or older adults). Fest 
held in several venues throughout Chicago & is pub- 
licized in local & national media. Events incl opening 
night gala, screenings for older adult groups, screen- 
ings tor gerontology professions 6k public screenings. 
Fest is noncompetitive except for Visionary Award, 
given to int'l or American feature film chosen for its 
exemplary portrayal of older adults. Deadline: Jan. 15 
(extensions given). Contact: Becky Cowing, Silver 
Images Film Festival, Terra Nova Films, 9848 S. 
Winchester Ave., Chicago, IL 60643; (312) 881- 
8491; fax: (312) 881-3368. 

SLICE OF LIFE FILM & VIDEO SHOWCASE, 

July 12 & 14, PA. Held at Penn State Univ., 14th 
annual edition of Slice of Life features competitively 
chosen observational doc films 6k videos, incl. those 
using experimental techniques. Fest "brings high- 
quality doc work from around the coutnry to large, 
intelligent, appreciative central PA audiences." 
Narrative works 6k works longer than 30 min. not 
accepted; shorter entries encouraged. Fest screening 
happens twice, same show. Winners' producers 
receive cash prize 6k certificate. Entry fee: $25. 
Formats: 16mm, 3/4"; preview on 16mm 6k 1/2". 
Deadline: April 1. Contact: Sedgwick Heskett, direc- 
tor, Documentary Resource Center, 106 Boalsburg 
Rd., RO. Box 909, Lemont, PA 16851; (814) 234- 
1945; fax: (814) 234-0939. 

SOUTH FLORIDA BLACK FILM FESTIVAL, 

April, FL. One week event showcasing feature films 
6k shorts in Miami 6k S. Florida area. Films fall under 
headings of Africa Night, Independent Features, 
International Night, Black Women Make Movies, 
Classics and Shorts. Each yr featured guest dialogues 
w/ audience about film industry. Oscar Micheaux 
Award Competition recognizes best video produced 
by student at local college. Founded in 1989, fest is 
invitational 6k showcases about 16 films each yr. 
Formats accepted: 35mm, 16mm. Entry fee: none. 
Deadline: early Feb. Contact: Monica Freeman, exec- 
utive director, South Florida Black Film Festival, 
5787 W. Sunrise Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33311; 
ph./fax (305) 571-9754. 

TAOS TALKING PICTURE FESTIVAL, April, 
NM. A multicultural celebration of cinema artists, 
their art and its audience. In conjunction w/ 
Conference on Media Literacy, fest serves as a ren- 
dezvous where people meet to trade ideas 6k inspira- 
tion in an atmosphere conducive to clear conscien- 
tious thought — a unique context in which to view 6k 
discuss art of film 6k ways in which media shape our 
lives. Focus of fest includes the best in new ind. films, 
media literacy, Native American 6k Latino filmmak- 
ers. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, video 6k multimedia. All 
lengths 6k genres. Entry fees from $15-$25. Deadline: 
Feb. 1. Contact: Kelly Clement, Events Director. 
Submissions must be on 1/2" VHS. For entry forms 
send SASE to: Taos Talking Pictures, 216M N. 
Pueblo Rd., #216, Taos, NM 87571; 
taosfilm(§4aplaza.taos.nm.us. 

USA FILM FESTIVAL, April, TX. Fest has 3 major 
components: noncompetitive feature section (now in 
25th yr); National Short Film 6k Video Competition 
(in 17th yr); 6k KidFilm (held in mid Jan, for new and 
classic live and animated features and shorts). 
Feature section programmed by artistic director 6k 
incl premieres of major new films, new works from 
ind. 6k emerging filmmakers, special film tributes, incl 



Great Director award 6k retrospective, panel discus- 
sions w/ filmmakers from around world. To enter, 
send preview cassette w/ publicity 6k production info. 
Short film 6k video competition showcases new 6k sig- 
nificant US work. Entries should be under 60 min., 
completed after Jan. 1 of the preceding yr. Cash prizes 
awarded in cats of narrative (fiction, dramatized 
events 6k adaptations of literary or dramatic works - 
$1,000); nonfiction (docs or portraits of actual per- 
sons or events - $1,000); animation (incl animation 
of graphics or 3D objects - $1,000); experimental 
(works that explore personal experience or film 6k 
video forms in innovative ways 6k can employ ele- 
ments of animation, narrative or doc - $1,000); Texas 
Award ($500); Student Award ($500); 
advertising/promo award (music videos, industrials, 
commercials, PSAs or other commissioned work 
exhibiting creativity 6k innovation); Family Award 
(dedicated to Charles Samu) of $500; 4 special jury 
awards ($250). Grand Prize Winner flown to Dallas 
to receive cash 6k award 6k present winning 
film/video. Formats accepted: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4", 
1/2". Entry fee: $40. Deadline: early March. Contact: 
Alonso Duralde, artistic director/Ann Alexander, 
managing director, USA Film Festival, 2917 Swiss 
Avenue, Dallas, TX 75204; (214) 821-6300; fax: 
6364- 

WASHINGTON DC INTERNATIONAL FILM 
FESTIVAL, Late April/early May, DC. Ninth season 
of this fest, which brings "best in new world cinema" 
to nation's capitol. Known as Filmfest DC, fest is non- 
competitive, presenting over 60 feature premieres, 
restored classics 6k special events. All Filmfest pre- 
sentations are Washington, DC premieres 6k pro- 
gramming consists of fiction, doc, animation, family 
6k children's programs, educational panels 6k work- 
shops. Festival "attempts to represent the broad geo- 
graphical diversity of world cinema-the newest films 
of emerging countries and the latest work from newly 
recognized young directors." Attendance last edition 
totaled over 22,000; fest is District-wide event which 
brings together city's major cultural institutions, incl. 
Smithsonian Institution (Public Services Program 6k 
Hirshhorn Museum), Library of Congress, American 
Film Institute, Black Film Institute, University of the 
District of Columbia, DC Public Library, National 
Archives 6k commercial movie theaters. Films shown 
throughout the city 6k several events presented free 
of charge. Special programs include Filmfest DC for 
Kids, series of family- oriented programs in libraries, 
hospitals 6k community centers; Global Rhythms, 
series of music films; 6k Cinema for Seniors. Formats 
accepted: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4". Entry fee: $30 features, 
$15 shorts. Deadline: early Feb. Contact: Tony 
Gittens, fest director, Washington DC International 
Film Festival, PO. Box 21396, Washington, DC 
20009; (202) 274-6810; fax: (202) 274-6828; film- 
festdc@ aol.com. 



Foreign 

BANFF TELEVISION FESTIVAL, June, Canada. 
Founded in 1979, fest has 3 components: int'l pro- 
gram competition, which awards coveted TV prize, 
the Banff Rockies; conference for TV professionals w/ 
important resource people; 6k informal environment 
in which to develop business relationships. Cats: TV 



features, limited series, continuing series, short 
dramas, TV comedies, social/political docs, popu- 
lar science programs, arts docs, performance spe- 
cials 6k children's programs. Competition entries 
must be made for TV (films in theatrical release 
ineligible). Entries originally in English or French 
must have TV premiere after March of preceding 
yr. Producers of best programs in each of 12 cats 
receive "Rockies" sculptures. Grand Prize, incl 
$5,000 Cdn. awarded to film or program judged 
Best of Fest. Jury may also make 2 Special Awards, 
incl $2,500 Cdn. for outstanding achievements. 
"On demand" screening facilities for all TV pro- 
grams invited or submitted to fest, in or out of 
competition. Formats accepted: 3/4". Entry fee: 
$200. Deadline: early Feb. Contact: Jerry Ezekiel, 
president/fest director, Banff Television Festival, 
The Banff Centre, 204 Caribou Street, #306, Box 
1020, Banff, Alberta, Canada T0L 0C0; (403) 
762-3060; fax: (403) 762-5357. 

CANNES INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTI- 
VAL, May, France. Cannes is largest and most 
well-known int'l film fest, attended by over 35,000 
guests, incl. stars, directors, distributors, buyers 6k 
journalists. Intensive round-the-clock screenings, 
parties, ceremonies, press conferences 6k one of 
world's largest film markets are fest hallmarks. 
Screening or award at Cannes can provide fame 6k 
prestige. Selection committee, appointed by 
Administration Board, chooses entries for Official 
Competition (about 20 films) and for Un Certain 
Regard section. Films must have been made w/in 
prior 12 mos, released only in country of origin 6k 
not entered in other film fests. Official component 
consists of 3 sections: In Competition, for features 
6k shorts competing for major fest awards: Palme 
d'Or, Special Jury Prize, Best Director, Best Actor, 
Best Director, Jury Prize. Special Out of 
Competition accepts features ineligible for compe- 
tition (e.g. by previous winners of the Palme d'Or). 
Un Certain Regard, noncompetitive section, is for 
films of int'l quality that do not qualify for 
Competition, films by new directors, etc. Parallel 
sections incl. Quinzaine des Realisateurs (Directors 
Fortnight), main sidebar for new talent, showing 
fiction feature films, sponsored by Association of 
French Film Directors (deadline mid April); La 
Semaine de la Critique (International Critics 
Week), selection of 1st or 2nd features and docs 
chosen by members of French Film Critics Union 
(selections must be completed w/in 12 mos prior to 
fest) 6k Perspectives on French Cinema. Film mar- 
ket, administered separately, screens film in main 
venue and in local theater. Top prizes incl. Official 
Competition's Palme d'Or (feature 6k short) and 
Camera d'Or (best first film in any sectipn). For 
info 6k press accreditation from U.S., contact: 
Catherine Verret, French Film Office, 745 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, NY 10151; (212) 832-8860; 
fax: (212) 755-0629. Additional contact informa- 
tion: Quinzaine des Realisateurs, Societe des 
Realisateuts de Films, 215 rue du Faubourg St. 
Honore, 75008 Paris, France; tel: 011 33 1 45 61 
01 66, fax: 011 33 1 40 74 07 96. Semaine 
International de la Critique, 73, rue de Lourmel, 
75015 Paris, France; tel: 011 33 1 45 75 68 27. 
Cannes Film Market, attn: Marcel Lathiere, 99 
boul. Maalesherbes, 75008 Paris, France; tel: 011 
33 1 45 61 66 09; fax: 011 33 1 45 61 97 59. 



64 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



Formats accepted: 35mm, 16mm. Entry fee: None . 
Deadline: early March. Contact: Cannes Inter- 
national Film Festival, 99, Boulevard Malesherbes, 
75008 Paris, France; tel: Oil 33 1 45 61 66 00; fax: 
Oil 33 145 61 97 60. 

GOLDEN ROSE OF MONTREUX TELEVI- 
SION FESTIVAL, Late April/early May, 
Switzerland. Organized jointly by Swiss Broad- 
casting Corporation and City of Montreux under 
auspices of European Broadcasting Union, this is 
Europe's largest fest for light entertainment tv pro- 
grams, now in its 36th yr & attended by 1,000 tv 
professionals from over 30 countries. Broadcaster, 
producer & distributor entries compete against 
each other in cats of comedy, music & general light 
entertainment, w/ each cat having its own int'l jury. 
Broadcasters 6a ind producers eligible to compete. 2 
awards in each cat: Silver Rose, Bronze Rose. In 
comedy cat, 1st prize is Special Prize of City of 
Montreux. 3 1st prizes submitted to Grand Jury for 
Golden Rose of Montreux award for best entertain- 
ment program of all cats, w/ cash award of SFr. 
10,000. Fest also awards Prix UNDA to program 
which best reflects human values, Press Prize & 3 
additional prizes at jury's discretion. Entries must 
have been completed w/in previous 14 mos, w/ run- 
ning time of 20-60 min. Complimentary Videokiosk 
screening facility where attendees can view latest in 
int'l light entertainment programming. Heavy int'l 
press coverage. Entry fees are payable only if the 
program is selected by pre-selection jury. Formats 
accepted: Beta, Beta SP; 1/2" for VideoKiosk. Entry 
fee: SFr. 500. Deadline: mid-Feb. Fest address: 
Pierre Grandjean, secretary general, Rose d'Or de 
Montreux, Television Suisse Romande, 20 Quai 
Ernest Ansermet, CH- 1211 Geneva, Switzerland; 
tel: 01 1 41 22 708 89 98; fax: 01 1 41 22 781 52 49. 
US contact: John E. Nathan, North American rep- 
resentative, Golden Rose of Montreux Television 
Festival, 488 Madison Avenue, Suite 1710, New 
York, NY 10022; (212) 223-0044; fax: (212) 223- 
4531. 

HAMBURG INTERNATIONAL SHORT/NO 
BUDGET FILM FESTIVAL, June, Germany. 
Forum for ind produced short films & videos under 
20 min. Int'l short film competition awards 
Hamburg Short Film Award (Major Award), donat- 
ed by Premiere; Jury's Special Award, Award for 
Best Animation, Premiere Prize (purchase of TV 
rights by Premiere & Canal +, France &. Spain) &. 
Viewers' Award. Fest also incl No Budget 
Competition, tor films which have been produced 
w/out public subsidies or private sponsorship; their 
foremost feature should be "realization of an idea," 
ck technical quality is lit secondary importance. No 
Budget Award (jury award) & Viewers' Award. 
Another fest feature is Three Minute Quickie com- 
petition, under different theme each yr (1995 
theme was "back door"). Entries in this cat should 
he 3 min. max. In 1995 fest inaugurated Int'l 
Hamburg Short Film Market, opportunity to see all 
films and videos submitted to fesi as well as films in 
ShortFilmAgency's video archive. 1995 test also 
debuted "i Hgjtal Video" section for entirely digital' 
ly produced videos w max length of 20 min. 
Formats accepted: 35mm, 16mm, 8mm, 3/4," 1/2," 
Beta SP Fntrv tee: None, Deadline: early March. 
( ' hi n i: Fesi I hrei tor, I lamburger Kurzfilmfestival 
No-Budget, KurzFilmAgentur Hamburg e.V, No 




rave 



NOlM IINEAR EDITING K)R 

FILM • VII)IO*MULIIMll)IA 

SOUND DESIGN • SYNCING * MIXING 

PROTOOLS 



EXTENSIVE SAMPLING + SOUND LIBRA!) 
BETA SP ACQUISITION ♦ LOCItt 
CROSS PLATFORM MULTIMEDIA + WEB AUTHORS 



SoHo TELE FAM 212:925:7759 

br.ivcC'i ngress.com 



1996 

CHARLOTTE 

Film & Video 

Festival 




May 2 -12, 1996 

Last year $8,000 in Artists Fees & Awards 

Entry Deadline: March 1, 1996 

Jurors: Vivian Kleiman and Brian Springer 

Contact: Robert West, Mint Museum of Art 

2730 Randolph Road, Charlotte NC 28207, (704) 337-2019, 

FAX (704) 337-2101 Email: MintFilm @aol.com 

Photo: Cuz It's Boy, Catherine Saaifieid 



*40N-|_INEA« CURE ALL 




off-line and transfers * 









Avid On-line 



MC 8000 with all the bolls and whistles. 




January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 65 



CODE 16 

16 MM EDGE NUMBERING 

^ Codes Every 16 Frames 

^ Prints on 4// 1 6 MM Stock 
Including Polyester 

& Clearest, Easiest to Read 
Numerals Anywhere 

Lowest Prices Anywhere 

Price per ft $.015 

1000 ft $15.00 

(212)496-1118 



Same day service - 
Weekends & rush hours possible 



262 W. 91 st St. 
NY, NY 10024 

Monday - Friday 10-5 



Beta SP to Beta SP 

3/4"SP interformat 

Character Generator 

Hi-8 transfers. Window dubs 

CMX EDL import & export 

24 hour access 

With editor 
S 55/hr 

Yourself 

$ 40/hr 
$ 300/day 
$ 150/night 




1 123 Broadway, Suite 814 
New York, New York 10010 

212-228-4254 



Budget-Buro Glashuttenstrasse 27, D-20357 
Hamburg, Germany; tel: 011 49 40 43 44 99; fax: 011 

49 40 430 27 03. 

KRACOW INTERNATIONAL SHORT FILM 
FESTIVAL, Late May/early June. Founded in 1963, 
this is one of longer running European competitive 
short film fests, providing presentation opportunity 
for any films, up to 30 min., released around world 
btw. successive festival events. Genres of films pre- 
sented during fest range from straightforward docs to 
cartoons; all are considered. Fest's preference is docs, 
especially ones that reflect changes in human condi- 
tion and environment at turn of the century, which 
"provide inspiring insight into social, political or 
national makeup of society at large." About 150 short 
films programmed each yr. Awards incl Grand Prix, 
Golden Dragon, Silver Dragon & Bronze Dragon. 
Formats accepted: 35mm, 16mm, 1/2", Beta. Entry 
fee: None. Deadline: mid-Feb. Contact: Festival 
Director, Kracow International Short Film Festival, 
Miedzynarodowy Festiwal Filmow Krotko- 
metrazowych W Krakow, Apollo Film, Ul. 
Pychowicka 730-364 Krakow, Poland; tel: 011 48 12 
67 23 40; fax: 011 48 12 67 15 2. 

LAON INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 
FOR YOUNG PEOPLE, Late March/early April. 
Fest for "high grade youth cinema promotion." 
Accepts feature-length films made for children & 
young people for competition, which shows about 10 
films; entries should not have been released in 
France. No selection of short films. Awards: Grand 
Prize (50,000FF) offered by Ministere de la Jeunesse 
et des Sports; City of Laon Prize (30,000FF); La Poste 
(20,000FF, and La Caisse d'Epargne (20,000FF); 
CIFEJ Prize. All of these prizes are offered to the 
French distributor. Formats accepted: 35mm, 16mm. 
Entry fee: None. Deadline: mid-Feb. Contact: Marie- 
Therese Chambon, festival director, Festival 
International du Cinema Jeune Public de Laon, 
Maison des Arts et Loisirs, Place Aubry, B.P 526, 
02001 Laon Cedex, France; tel: 011 33 23 20 38 61; 
fax:01133 23 20 28 99- 

MELBOURNE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTI- 
VAL, June, Australia. FIAPF-recognized fest cele- 
brates its 45th anniversary in 1996 as one of 
Australia's 2 largest, and its oldest, fests. Fest director 
programs eclectic mix of ind work, with special inter- 
est in feature docs & shorts. Each yr substantial pro- 
gram of new Australian cinema programmed. Int'l 
short film competition is important part of fest, w/ 
cash prizes in 7 cats: Grand Prix City of Melbourne 
Award for Best Film ($5,000); & $2,000 each in best 
Australian, experimental, animated, doc 6k fiction 
film cats. Additional special awards incl: Kino 
Cinemas Award for creative excellence in Australian 
short film ($2,500); AN ZAAS/Science works award 
for outstanding film or video dealing w/ science -relat- 
ed subject ($1,500); Melbourne International Film 
Festival Awards for outstanding achievement in 
video production & best student production. Entry 
open to films of all kinds, except training & advertis- 
ing films. Films 60 min. or less eligible for Int'l Short 
Film Competition; films over 60 min. can be entered 
in non- competitive feature program. Video 6k super 8 
productions considered for "out-of-competition" 
screenings. Entries must have been completed w/in 
the previous yr 6k not screened previously in 
Melbourne or broadcast on Australian TV. Fest is 



useful window to Australian theatrical 6k nonthe- 
atrical outlets, educational distributors 6k new 
Australian television networks interested in buying 
shorts. Formats accepted: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4," 1/2," 
super 8. Entry fee: $20. Deadline: mid-March. 
Contact: Tait Brady, festival director, Melbourne 
International Film Festival, 207 Johnston Street, 
EO. Box 2206, Fitzroy 3065 Australia; tel: 011 61 3 
417 2011; fax: 011 613 417 3804. 

MIP/TV INTERNATIONAL TELEVISION 
PROGRAM MARKET, April, France. One of 
busiest int'l TV markets, held at Cannes' Palais des 
Festivals 6k considered 1 of largest 6k most impor- 
tant program markets for buying 6k selling of pro- 
gram rights 6k setting up co-production agreements 
6k joint ventures. Several thousand TV buyers 
(public 6k commercial), distributors, programmers, 
producers 6k other media professionals from over 
100 countries attend. In 1995 there were 833 regis- 
tered exhibitors, 2,245 companies registered, and 
over 10,000 attendees. Market publishes 2 maga- 
zines 6k guide which encompass themes of market. 
Listings in market publication incl major trends, 
calendars of events, seminar programs, new compa- 
nies, new services 6k lists of leading buyers at MIR 
Other services incl MIP-TV News, special reports 6k 
9,000 copies of MIP-TV Guide (a who's who). 
Market receives major attention in int'l trade press. 
Participation w/out stand possible; that service incl. 
admission for 3 employees, use of participant's club 
6k listing in MIP-TV guide. Formats accepted: 
35mm, 16mm, 3/4". Entry fee: varies. Deadline: 
early March. Contact: Jacques Gibout, internation- 
al sales director, MIP/TV International Television 
Program Market, Marche International des 
Programmes de Television, Reed Midem 
Organisation, 179 avenue Victor-Hugo, 75116 
Paris, France; tel: 01 1 33 1 44 34 44 44; fax: 01 1 33 
1 44 34 44 00. US contact: International Exhibition 
Organization, 475 Park Avenue South, 30th fl., 
New York, NY 10016; (212) 689-4220; fax: (212) 
689-4348. 

MONS INTERNATIONAL SHORT FILM FES- 
TIVAL, March, Belgium. Founded in 1976, this 
competitive fest annually showcases about 150 
35mm short film productions over 3 days, before 3 
international jury 6k audiences of over 1,000. Young 
filmmakers especially welcomed. Entries must have 
been completed w/in previous 2 years. Awards incl 
Gold Monkeys, Special Prizes 6k cash awards. 
Formats accepted: 35mm; preview on cassette. 
Entry fee: None. Deadline: early February. Contact: 
Alain Cardon, president Mons International Short 
Film Festival, Festival International du Film Court 
de Mons, 106, rue des Arbalestriers, 7000 Mons, 
Belgium; tel: 011 32 65 31 81 75; fax: 011 32 65 31 
30 27. 

OBERHAUSEN INTERNATIONAL SHORT 
FILM FESTIVAL, April, Germany. Founded short- 
ly after WWII under annual theme Way to the 
Neighbor, this important fest on int'l short film fest 
circuit showcases innovative ind. 6k experimental 
short 6k doc films of all genres. It has always been 
known as place of debates 6k controversial films 6k 
fest is committed to following new trends in media 
6k technology, forms 6k expressions featured in 
short film, aesthetical developments in video works 
6k specific artistic approaches to computer-generat- 



66 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



ed images. FIAPF-recognized competitive event 
programs social doc, new developments in anima- 
tion, experimental & short features, student films 
(especially from film schools), first films & works 
from countries throughout world. Different sec- 
tions & int'l competition screen films 6k videos up 
to 35 min., completed after Jan 1st of preceding 2 
yrs. Awards: Grand Prize of Town of Oberhausen 
(DM10,000); 2 Principal Prizes (DM5,000 each); 
Special Prizes (DMl,000-5,000), inch Eulenspiegel- 
Preis (Owlglass Prize) for Most Humorous 
(DM1,000); Alexander Scotti prize to best film on 
"Old Age and Death" (DM2,000); Best Film on 
Educational Politics (DM5,000); Fipresci Prize 
(DM2,000); Prize of Catholic Film Association 
(DM2,000). Special programs also part of fest, as is 
German Competition, retrospective of film school, 
Filmotheque of Youth & Children's Cinema 
Competition, which awards prize of DM3,000, 
decided by jury of children. Fest also has a concur- 
rent market. Formats accepted: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4", 
1/2", Super 8, Beta, Pal, 8mm. Entry fee: None. 
Deadline: mid-Feb. Contact: Angela Haardt, 
Oberhausen International Short Film Festival, 
Internationale Kurzfilmtage Oberhausen, Grillo- 
strasse 34, D-46042 Oberhausen, Germany; tel: 
011 49 208 807 008; fax: 011 49 208 825 5413; 
kurzfilmtage. oberhausen(«' uni.duisburg.de. 

SYDNEY FILM FESTIVAL, June, Australia. This 
major FIAPF-recognized Australian film event is 
one of world's oldest (over 40 years old) 6k leading 
international showcases for new work. Its stated 
purpose is to create 6k maintain interest in cinema 
by discriminating audience, to present films which 
otherwise might not have been shown in Sydney, to 
gain attention 6k publicity for films shown 6k to 
assist in their wider Australian distribution 6k to 
promote better understanding among nations 
through film medium. Noncompetitive int'l pro- 
gram incl. features 6k docs from around worl 
experimental works; retrospective; competition for 
Australian short films; special nights featuring par- 
ticular country or region; late shows offering some- 
thing out of ordinary; as well as series of forums 6k 
lectures w/ visiting directors. Many of selected films 
shared w/ Melbourne Film Fest, which runs almost 
concurrently. Fest director attends number of int' 
fests each yr as well as working w/ several film insti- 
tutions around world to solicit entries. Most 
Australian distributors 6k TV buyers attend. Fest 
has enthusiastic 6k loyal audience 6k is excellent 
opportunity tor publicity 6k access to Australian 
markets. Fesl is held at State Theatre, 1929 picture 
palace acknowledged as one of finest fest venues in 
world; other city venues also used, lest conducts 
audience survey, w/ results provided to participat- 
ing filmmakers; results have good deal oi influence 
w/ Australian distributors. Entries must have been 
completed w in previous 18 mos 6k be Australian 
premieres. Formats accepted: 70mm, 35mm, 
16mm, 1/2". Entry fee: None. Deadline: mid- 
March. Contact: Paul Byrnes, festival director, 
Sydney film festival, P.O. Rox 950, Glebe, NSW 
Australia; tel: 011612 660 3844; tax: 011 61 2 692 
8793. 

TORONTO WORLDWIDE SHORT FILM 
FESTIVAL, Late May early June, Canada. All- 
sIh>[(s competitive fesl solicits int'l entries tor pro- 



An Edit Room with windows?!? 
YES! 

New AVID Media Composer 4000 

System 5.2 w/ AVR-27 & 18 GB 

Available in our Sunny SoHo studio or delivered to you. 
• Office space available • 



JBk» 



contact Rob Lawson at: 
Lovett Productions, Inc. 



(212)242-8999 




JURAS GRAPHICS 

What do you want in an animation? 
You want it to look good and believable. 

*We don't just simulate it. < We ma/^e reaCity. 
If you think it should be believable too, give us a call. We 
have the expertise and equipment like the big labs do. 

Call (708) 265-8811 

January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 67 




non-Linear editing \>or Independents 



<& 212.254.4361 



Video Duplication 

READY NEXT DAY- Mon-Fri 

3/4" U-matic & 1/2" VHS or Beta II Copies 

FROM 3/4", 1/2" VHS MASTER Add $25.00 per ONE INCH Master 

FROM ONE 20 MINUTES 30 MINUTES 60 MINUTES 1/2" VHS/Beta II 
MASTER 3/4" 1/2" 3/4" 1/2" 3/4" 1/2" 90 MIN. 120 MIN. 



One Copy $4.00 $4.00 $6.00 $5.00 $9.00 $8.00 $11.00 $14.00 

2-4 Copies 3.50 3.00 5.50 4.50 8.00 6.00 8.00 9.00 

5-9 Copies 3.00 2.50 4.50 3.50 7.00 5.00 7.00 8.00 

10-19 Copies 2.50 2.00 4.00 3.00 6.00 4.50 6.00 7.00 

1-4 RUSH Dubs. $8.00 $11.00 $17.00 $22.00 $28.00 

TC Burn In $10.00 $14.00 $26.00 Inquire for LABELING 

Window Dubs 5.00 7.00 13.00 & SHRINK WRAP 

PRICES ARE PER COPY- STOCK NOT INCLUDED. ASSEMBLY CHARGES ARE ADDITIONAL. 



EQUIPMENT: 3/4" Sony, 1/2" Panasonic 2 ch. industrial recorders and Grass 
Valley & Videotek distributors. Time base correction, optional, with Microtime 
and Tektronix equipment. TITLING & EDITING FACILITIES AVAILABLE 

3/4" & 1/2" EDITING Evenings & 24 Hour Access 
With and Without an Editor Instructions Available 
CHYRON TITLER AVAILABLE 
ONE LIGHT FILM TO TAPE TRANSFERS 
FILM STOCK. VIDEO TAPE, AUDIO TAPE, LEADER & SUPPLIES 

(212)475-7884 

814 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK, NY 10003 




24 Digital Tracks 



MERCER STREET 



Sound Design 



s 



Original Music 



DIGITAL AUDIO 
- PRODUCTION - 

for Film and Video 
and Multimedia 



Sound Effects 



Voiceover and ADR 



MIDI Room 



Protools/Fairlight/ADAT 



Discount rates for independents 



133 MERCER ST. NYC 10012 • 212.966-6794 • E-mailmercerst@aol.com 



gram. Purpose of fest is "to broaden people's per- 
spective on short films so as to view them on an 
artistic and commercial level.. .to help educate and 
expose the culturally diverse audience to the short 
film genre." Awards: best animated short, best 
short doc, best dramatic short, best short comedy, 
best experimental short. Spafax Airline Network 
presents award for films that will be selected to air 
on Air Canada. Sections of fest inch Galas, 
International Program, Visions Canada, First 
Nations Productions (for submissions from aborigi- 
nal filmmakers from around world), Established 
Directors First Short, and Award Winning Shorts. 
Entries must not exceed 40 min. and must have 
been produced w/in last 2 yrs. Fest receives over 
100 entries from throughout world; also sponsors 
short film market. Formats accepted: 35mm, 
16mm. Entry fee: $8. Deadline: mid-March. 
Contact: Brenda Sherwood, executive director, 
Toronto Worldwide Short Film Festival, 1240 Bay 
Street, Suite 305, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5R 
2A7; tel: (416) 966-4846; fax: (416) 966-4743. 

! TRENTO INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF 
MOUNTAIN AND EXPLORATION FILMS, 

Late April/early May, Italy. 1996 marks 44th edi- 
tion of this competitive fest devoted to mountain 
films (which contribute to knowledge 6k conserva- 
tion of mountains by exalting their symbolic values 
& representing their historical, social & environ- 
mental reality); exploration films (which broaden 
& examine discovery 6k/or study of territories, 
water & space, incl. outer space & related physical, 
anthropological, ethnological, natural & faunistic 
phenomena); & mountaineering, adventure 6k 
sports films (which examine man's resources in 
action in natural mountain environments, particu- 
larly in sport & mountaineering) . Long, medium & 
short films & telefilms (fiction & doc) eligible for 
competition. Awards: Gran Premio "Citta di 
Trento" (Gold Gentian & 10,000,000 lire); Silver 
Gentians & 3,000,000 lire each to best fiction fea- 
ture film, best film on mountaineering, best film on 
exploration and/or environmental conservation, 
best film on adventure, including RAI Award for 
best electronically created film. Special Jury Prize 
for Italian director & Special Prize for best photog- 
raphy. Films may also be shown out of competition. 
Deadline: early March. Contact: Gian Luigi Bozza, 
festival director, Filmfestival Internazionale della 
Montagna e dell'Esplorazione, Via S. Croce 67, 
38100 Trento, Italy; tel: Oil 39 461 98 61 20; fax: 
Oil 39 461 23 78 32. 

TURIN INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF 
LESBIAN AND GAY FILMS, April, Italy. 1995 
marked 10th edition of fest, making it one of 
longest-running int'l gay & lesbian events. Entries 
should be by lesbian/gay filmmakers or address les- 
bian/gay themes & issues. 1995 edition showed 
about 150 titles. Competition section divided betw 
3 juries: doc, long feature 6k short feature. 
Panorama section features new int'l productions. 
New award named after the late Ottravio Mai, who 
co-founded the festival, is presented to best screen- 
play for short film w/ gay theme. Formats accepted: 
35mm, 16mm. Entry fee: None. Deadline: early 
February. Contact: Elisabetta Humouda, program 
coordinator, Turin International Festival of Lesbian 
and Gay Films, Da Sodoma a Hollywood, Via T 



68 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



Tasso 1 1, 10122 Torino, Italy; tel: 01 1 39 1 1 534 888; 
fax: Oil 39 11 535 796. 

VERONA INTERNATIONAL CINEMA 
WEEK, April, Italy. Annual fest, founded in 1970, is 
devoted to the film production of one nation (or 
nations w/ common geographic & cultural tradi- 
tions), which is usually distributed in Italy only par- 
tially or is limited to certain directors. 
Countries/regions have incl. Africa, Poland, Canada, 
Belgium, Greece, India, Brazil, Turkey, Japan, 
Australia, Russia, etc. Parallel sections feature, e.g., 
works of renowned director from guest country 6k 
int'l round table at end of week in which themes 
emerging from films are discussed. In 1995, fest was 
devoted to British Cinema; new productions direct- 
ed by emerging talents running for award "Stefano 
Reggiani" for best recently-produced film, retro sec- 
tion devoted to Laurence Olivier; & a section 
inspired by Romeo 6k Juliet's myth. Nat' and int'l 
coverage is extensive, w/ fest covered in up to 70 
magazines, papers 6k networks. About 30 films show- 
cased each yr. Formats accepted: 35mm. Entry fee: 
None. Deadline: mid-Feb. Contact: Pietro Barzisa, 
festival director, Verona International Cinema Week, 
Settimana Cinematografica Internazionale, Via S. 
Giacomo alia Pigna 6, 37121 Verona, Italy; tel: 011 
39 45 8006778; fax: 01 1 39 45 590624. 

VUES D'AFRIQUE, Late April/early May, Canada. 
Along with FESPACO in Ouagadougou, fest found- 
ed in 1983, is impt showcase for films from Africa 6k 
African diaspora. Over 55,000 people attend screen- 
ings. Cats of exhibition incl. Panorama du cinema 
africain, Images Creoles, Televisions africaines, 



Regard canadien, Ecrans Nord-Sud, and new section 
Franco-Sud. 1995 festival incl. section on historical 
colonial cinema 6k initiated Prix du Public 6k Prix 
video-clips. It also held colloquium on "Rwanda and 
International Information." Other programs incl. 
debates 6k conferences, cinema for youth, exposi- 
tions, information kiosks, music, dance, literature 6k 
food. Fiction 6k doc, long 6k short are programmed. 
Fest also travels to other cities in Canada. Formats 
accepted: 35mm, 16mm. Entry fee: None. Deadline: 
late March. Contact: Geraldine Le Chene Vues 
d'Afrique, Les Journees du Cinema Africain et 
Creole, 67 rue Ste. Catherine Ouest, 5eme etage, 
Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2X 1Z7; (514) 284- 
3322; fax: (514)845-0631. 

WORLD WIDE VIDEO FESTIVAL, April, The 
Hague. This fest entered its 14th year in 1996. Last yr 
more than 100 recent video productions illustrating 
recent electronic arts developments were screened; 
CD-i and CD-ROM were introduced in 1995, shown 
along w/ selection of int'l videotapes 6k installations. 
Screenings, presentations, lectures 6k symposia at 
Theater aan het Spui in center of The Hague. 
Installations shown at World Wide Video Centre, 
Haags Centrum voor Aktuele Kunst, het Archiet, 
Galerie Maldoror en Theater Zeebelt. All selected 
productions shown publicly on large screen or moni- 
tor, depending on nature of work. All genres accept- 
ed 6k productions may be presented in any language. 
Straight recordings of performances, theater or music 
as well as film transferred to video not eligible; film 
excerpts 6k slides allowed as part of video work. 
Videomarket, held for 2 days during fest, is opportu- 
nity for distributors, producers, artists, magazines 6k 



art spaces.. Formats accepted: 3/4," 1/2," CD-ROM. 
Entry fee: None. Deadline: early March. Contact: 
Antoinette te Paske, World Wide Video Festival, Spui 
189, 2511 BN The Hague, The Netherlands; tel: 01 1 

31 70 36 44805; fax: 011 31 70 36 14448; 
1 00340.4 1 1 @compuserve.com. 

YAMAGATA INTERNATIONAL DOCUMEN- 
TARY FILM FESTIVAL, October, Japan. Founded 
in 1989, this fest endeavors to promote "best works of 
doc art" in main competition and in variety of special 
events, such as an ongoing Asia Program. Fest is 
sponsored by Yamagata City, about 360 km NE of 
Tokyo. Entries should be films intended to be docs, 
unreleased publicly in Japan prior to fest, produced 
after Apr 1 of the preceding 2 yrs 6k feature-length 
(over 60 min.). Int'l jury awards: Grand Prize, known 
as Robert and Frances Flaherty Prize (¥3,000,000); 
Mayor's Prize (¥1,000,000); 2 runner up prizes 
(¥300,000 each) 6k 1 special prize (¥300,000). 
Formats accepted: 35mm, 16mm. Entry fee: None. 
Deadline: late March. Contact: Kazuyuki Yano, 
director, Tokyo Office, Yamagata International 
Documentary Film Festival, Tokyo Office, Kitagawa 
Bldg., 4th Fl., 6-42 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 
162, Japan; tel: 011 81 3 32 66 97 04; fax: 011 81 3 

32 66 97 00; hhg02034(«'niftyserve.or.jp. U.S. con- 
tact: Gordon Hitchens, 214 West 85th Street, Apt. 
3W, New York, NY 10024-3914; tel/fax: (212) 877- 
6856. 



ni fl pr, °d uc t io,is ™ ^^^^^ 


I SB 1 ' WEEHAWKEN STREET ^ps\ 


IV 8 ■ I GREENWICH VILLAGE, NY 10014 |H , H llUa 


■ IS 1 TELEPHONE 212-691-1038 .-((jSSiir ^^S^ jtilll 


%^H MB %pT FAX 212-691-6864 >g^ ^^^^^^^^ 




Film/Video f«P"W^ 






AVID™ SUITESl BBiM^^ 






RENTALS OR CREATIVE SERVICES ~"" ww >i'i"iiliffitt 




■ NON-LINEAR OFF-LINE DIGITAL EDITING 


■ LONG OR SHORT FORMATS 


■ INSTANT ACCESS TO HOURS OF FOOTAGE 




Audio 






3 DIGITAL AUDIO SUITES / 24 TRACK ANALOG 






RENTALS OR CREATIVE SERVICES 




■ SOUND DESIGN / SOUND EDITING / MIXING 


■ ADR / SFX / FOLEY 


■ SCORING / ARRANGING 


■ LIVE RECORDING 


call 2 1 2-691 -1 038 




FOR BROCHURE / INFORMATION 






GLC FOR POST-PRODUCTION SOLUTIONS 





4*S 


i 

•all. 




f///f////t 




Audio Post 


Original 


Music 


Production 


• Films 


• Voice Over 


• Features 


• Digital Editing 


• Shorts 


• Sound Design 


• Animation 


• Sound Effects 


• Commercials 


• Inserts 


• Radio 




• Corporate 




w^^^ ^^^H 


*■=&*'< ~tt i ^dlii 


212*947 


•6107 


50 W. 34th Street. SuHe 9C9, New York. NY 10001 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 69 




classifieds have a 240-character limit. cost: 
$25/issue for aivf members; $35 for novem- 
bers, include valid member id# when submit- 
ting ads. ads exceeding requested length will 
be edited. all advertising copy should be 
typed, double-spaced & accompanied by check 
or money order payable to: fivf, 304 hudson st., 
ny, ny 10013. to pay by credit card, you must 
include: credit card type (visa/mc); card num- 
ber; name on card; expiration date; billing 
address & cardholder's daytime phone. dead- 
lines are 1st of each month, two months prior 
to cover date (e.g. feb. 1 for april issue). 

Buy • Rent • Sell 

3/4" SP SONY OFFLINE SYSTEM W/ TIME- 
CODE: 9850 deck w/ timecode generator/reader, 
9800 deck w/ timecode reader, RM450 controller & 
2 13" monitors. Negotiable, low rates. Call (718) 
284-2645. 

COMPLETE 16MM FILM PRODUCTION pkg: 

Local (Atlanta) weekend rentals only. $250/day. 
Sync camera (Eclaire NPR), sound & light pkg Price 
also includes 1-4 PAs. Contact Cliff Lyttle @ Mecca 
Motion Pictures, Atlanta, GA (404) 808-7139. 

FOR RENT: Hi8 Sony 3-chip VX-3 camcorders, 
$75/day or $400/wk; plus mikes, lighting gear, stands, 
etc. negotiable. Deposit required. Call White St. TV 
Studio (212) 274-0036. 



FOR SALE: Save $600 on a brand new Sony CCD- 
VX3 Hi8 3-chip. Call (212) 966-0625. 

FOR SALE: Sony 3/4" offline system. Sony VO- 
5850, VO-5800, RM-440 controller, 2 Panasonic 13" 
(BT-1300N) color monitors. Excellent condition, 
privately owned, $6,500. Tom (212) 929-2439. 

GREAT EDITING SYSTEM FOR SALE: Sony 
EVO-9700. Hi8 dual decks w/ titler. Excellent con- 
dition, privately owned. $3,000. Call (718) 232- 
7572. 

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT: 100 sq. ft. turn-key 
office avail, immediately until June '96. Access to 
phone, fax, copier, at IFP offices in lower midtown. 
Call Sarie Horowitz for more info: (212) 465-8200, 
ext. 201. 

Distribution 

ABCs OF LIBRARY DISTRIBUTION: Discover 
the keys to unlocking this lucrative market. 
Comprehensive report offers sure cure for the 



"Distribution Blues." Satisfaction guaranteed. 
$15.95 (TX +6.25% sales tax). MC/Visa/check. Call 
(800) 697-2391. 

AQUARIUS PRODUCTIONS, INC., leading 
int'l distributor of videos on health care, seeks new 
videos on abuse, violence, addiction & special ed as 
well as aging 6k disabilities. Call/send videos for pre- 
view. Leslie Kussman, Aquarius, 5 Powderhouse Ln., 
Sherborn, MA 01770; (508) 651-2963. 

ATA TRADING CORP., actively 6k successfully 
distributing ind. prods, for over 50 years, seeks new 
programming of all types for worldwide distribution 
into all markets. Contact us at (212) 594-6460. 

CLNESTAR, French film co. making English-lang. 
films in SE India (eg, doc. on Utopian city Auroville) 
seeks US partners for coprod. 6k distrib. in the US 
and worldwide. Contact: M. Josef Essberger 145 Bd. 
St. Germain, 75006 Paris; ph/fax (33.1) 46345922. 

CS ASSOCIATES seeks documentaries for foreign 
and domestic distribution. We also secure co-pro- 
duction funds for unfinished projects. Our catalog 
includes: The Civil War, Frontline, Children of Fate, 
and The Day After Trinity. Call (415) 383-6060. 

FANLIGHT PRODUCTIONS, distributor of 
award-winning film 6k video on disabilities, health 
care, mental health, family/social issues, etc. seeks 
new work for distribution to educational markets. 
Karen McMillen, Fanlight Productions, 47 Halifax 
St., Boston, MA 02130; (800) 937-4113. 

FILMO COMMUNICATIONS PRIVATE LTD, 

Singapore media distrib. co., sourcing programs for 
nontheatrical, educ. 6k public library markets for TV, 
cable 6k video-on-demand. Stephen K. H. Say, Man- 
aging Din, Filmo Communications Pvt Ltd, Block 
165, Bukit Merah Central #07-3677, Singapore 
150165, Republic of Singapore; fax: (65) 2781009. 

SEEKING EDUCATIONAL VIDEOS on guid- 
ance issues such as violence, drug prevention 6k par- 
enting for exclusive distribution. Our aggressive mar- 
keting produces unequaled results. Bureau for At- 
Risk Youth, 645 New York Ave., Huntington, NY 
11743; (800) 99-YOUTH. 

TAPESTRY INTERNATIONAL, LTD: Exper- 
ienced worldwide TV 6k home video distributor of 
quality docs, drama, music, children's 6k cultural pro- 
gramming is actively seeking new acquisitions. VHS 
to: Attn: Anthony LaTorella, 920 Broadway, 15 fl., 
NY, NY 10010. 



Freelancers 

16MM PROD, pkg w/ cinematographer from 
$200/day. Complete pkg incl. camera, Nagra, mikes, 
Mole/Lowell lights, dolly, etc. 16mm post avail.: edit- 
ing, sound xfers to 16 mag (.055/ft.) edgecoding 
(.01/ft.) sound mix ($70/hr). Call Tom (201) 807- 
0155. 

BETA SP cameraman w/ Sony 3-chip BVP-70/BVV- 
5SP, avail, for your project. Equip, pkg, DP kit, 
Sennheiser mics., 5-passenger van. Audio engineer 
avail. 3/4" offline editing system. Thomas (212) 929- 
2439; (201) 667-9894. 

CAMERAMAN: Aaton 16 6k S-16mm, Beta SP, 
EVW 300 Pro Hi8 6k Underwater 16mm prod. pkgs. 



avail., incl. lighting 6k car. The usual awards 6k 
experience in music video, commercials, features, 
PBS docs, industrials, etc. Flexible rates for interest- 
ing ind. projects. David (212) 254-4566. 

CAMERAMAN: Award-winning, sensitive, effi- 
cient. 10 yrs. experience in docs 6k industrials, over- 
seas projects. Complete broadcast-quality Sony 
BVW-300A Beta SP pkg Rates tailored to prject 6k 
budget. Can speak Japanese. Scott, Public Eye 
Prods., (212) 627-1244. 

CAMERAMAN: Owner Sony 3-chip EVW-300 
broadcast quality Hi8 pkg NYC-based, very flexible 
rates. Will travel. Conversational French 6k Italian. 
Comprehensive background in photography 6k 
sculpture. More info, contact John Anderson (212) 
875-9731. 

CAMERAWOMAN: professionally 6k creatively 
pushes the limits of Hi8, Beta SP 6k low budget 
16mm. Hi8 pkg: Canon L-l, zoom 6k w/a lenses; fil- 
ters, mics., tripod. Beta pkg also avail. Eileen (718) 
963-2158. 

CINEMATOGRAPHER w/ Aaton pkg, reg. & S- 
16 capable. Narrative, music videos, docs. Flexible 
rates for low and no budget projects. Call Kevin 
(212) 229-8357. 

CINEMATOGRAPHER w/ interesting credits 
owns 35mm 6k S-16/16mm Aaton pkg for your fea- 
ture film, short or music video. Call Brendan Flint 
for info 6k reel at (212) 226-8417 (tel/fax). 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY looking for 
interesting features, shorts, ind. projects, etc. 
Credits include features, commercials, industrials, 
short films, music videos. Aaton 16/S-16 pkg avail. 
Call Abe (914) 783-3159. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY looking for 
provocative dramatic films 6k feature shorts. Award 
winning, creative 6k efficient. Doc/commercial/net- 
work credits. Owner Aaton XTR Prod 6k Beta SP 6k 
AVID MC400. Great reel. Call Richard (212) 247- 
2471. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY w/ awards, 
talent 6k experience. Credits incl. features, commer- 
cials, industrials, docs, shorts 6k music videos. 
Owner of Aaton 16mm/S-16 pkg 35mm pkg also 
avail. Call for my reel. Bob (212) 741-2189. 

DONUTS FNCLUDED! DP w/ Sony Betacam SP 
and Arri 16mm. HMI lighting, Mole tungsten, 
Sennheiser shotguns, wireless 6k complete grip. I'm 
fun, fast, 6k easy to work w/. Point me in the right 
direction 6k I'll do the rest. (203) 254-7370. E-mail 
bsterndp@aol.com. Reel available. 

DP W/ IKEGAMI DIGITAL CAMERA, BVW 50 

or BW 5, full field Betacam SP pkg (Arri lights, 
Vinten tripod, top-quality audio, transportation.) 
Network/int'l credits, competitive rates. Fluency in 
Spanish. Hal (201) 461-5132. 

ENTERTAINMENT ATTORNEY: Frequent 
contributor to "Legal Briefs" columns in The 
Independent 6k other magazines, offers legal services 
to film 6k video community on projects from devel- 
opment to distribution. Reasonable rates. Contact: 
Robert L. Seigel, Esq. (212) 307-7533. 

EXPERIENCED DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRA- 



70 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



PHY w/ Arri 16 SR & Aaton S-16 pkgs., plus Mole 
Richardson lighting pkg, seeks interesting film pro- 
jects in feature or short-subject form. Very reason- 
able rates for directors & screenwriters. (212) 737- 
6815; fax 423-1125. 

MUSIC BY COMPOSER who has scored over 7 
award-winning films. Owns &. operates complete 
music prod, facility w/ multitrack recording & 
works well w/ directors & editors. "The music 
speaks for itself." Phil. Express (212) 727-3705. 

STEADICAM: Dolly smooth moves w/ flexibility 
of hand-held camera. Call Sergei Franklin (212) 
228-4254. 

SU-CITY PICTURES EAST PRESENTS: The 

Screenplay Doctor, The Movie Mechanic &. The 
Film Strategists — Story editors/post-prod, special- 
ists will analyze your work-in-progress. Studio/ind. 
background. Multimedia & adv. technology consul- 
tations. Reasonable rates. (212) 219-9224. 

WORD PROCESSING provided by certified pro- 
fessional secretary from handwritten/typed copy or 
taped dictation. Transcription of audiotapes 6k. | 
videotapes also available. Donna Chambers, The 
Electronic Cottage, (770) 832-7188. 



Opportunities • Gigs 

ASST. PROFESSOR, SCREENWRITING, 

tenure track, Sept. 1996. Significant prof, record of | 
scripts produced, MFA or PhD 6k prior teaching 
exp. necessary. Send vitae, sample of produced 
writing 6k 3 letters of recommendation by Jan. 3 
(for full consideration) to Laura Kipnis, 
Northwestern Univ., Radio/TV/Film, 1905 
Sheridan, Evanston, IL 60208. AA/EOE. 

CAMERAPERSONS WANTED: C.O.A., a free- 
lance camera group, seeking very strong hand-held 
cinema verite doc. camerapersons w/ excellent 
lighting skills, to shoot network news 6k. magazine 
style shows. Contact Chris Caris (212) 505-191 1. 

DP/CAMERAPERSON WANTED for fully- 
funded long-form doc. Feminist crew and subject. 
Experience in Beta SP video and S8 film. Fax bio to 
(404) 584-8211. 

FILM CREW TRAINEES NEEDED. Ground 
floor opportunity. Atlanta area production assis- 
tants 6k/or knowledgeable persons, send resum£ or 
call PC Jenkins for interview. Mecca Motion 
Picture Corp., 1100 Circle 75 Pky., ste. 800, 
Atlanta, GA 30339; (404) 808-7139. 

LECTURER, VIDEO PROD., 3-yr term. 
Committed to video as art form. Course in single 
cam vid, TV prod or computer anim 6k othr area of 
exp. 3 crs/term. MFA or othr term degree 6k teach 
exp. Ltr/CV/work smpls/3 refs by 1/10/96 to Video 
Prod Search, Film/Video, Univ. of Michigan, 2512 
Frieze, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. EOE/AA 



Preproduction • Development 

PRODUCERS accepting WGA-registered, fea- 
ture-length screenplays. Submission must include 
l-pg, synopsis. Send script, large SASE to: PDJ 
Productions, 7 P.irk Avenue, New York, NY 10016. 




*n*D/Vision Pro 2.2 



Digital Non-Linear editing for film and Video. Rock solid EDLs for 
negative match back or on-line video. ABSOLUTE LOWEST RATES 
by the hour, day, week, or by the project. Students Welcome. 

©ROB SQUARED FILMS: 212/580-4169® 

235 WEST END AVENUE, #1 IB, NEW YORK, NY 10023 



Hi-8/Befacam Sp 

Packages 

SONY, BETACAM SP CAMCORDER 
PACKAGE... $400 

SONY, PRO HI BAND 
PACKAGE... $200 

INCLUDED IN EACH PACKAGE: 

■ Light Kit plus Sun Gun w/Battery Belt 

■ Audio Kit plus Shore Field Mixer FP32 

■ Field monitor ■ Fluid tripod 

■ 

VHS-VHS PROFESSIONAL 
EDITING SYSTEM 

DO YOUR HI-8 AND BETACAM SP 
OFF LINE EDITING ON: 

JVC BR8600U to JVC BR8600U 
W/RM86U editing console... $10 per/hr. 

PEOPLE W/AIDS PROJECTS DISCOUNT 



Manahatta Images Corp. 

260 WEST 10TH STREET, STE. 1E 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10014 
212-807-8825 FAX AVAILABLE 



WHEN IT COMES TO 



Bl 111! 



WE ARE 
THE EXPERTS! 




AVID 



COMPOSER I 



: BROADCAST QUALITY 

♦ FILM COMPOSER OPTION (24 FRAMES) 

♦ PRO-TOOL SOUND EDITING OPTION 

♦ 24 Tracks Video Layering 

♦ 24 Tracks Audio 

♦ 4Ch. Audio Playback 

♦ Real Time Special Effects & Titles 



SOAP Product! 
\J I— r\ l\ 580 B'WAY, MYC 



4 

NEW YORK 

420 LEXINGTON AVENUE 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 10170-0199 

TEL: (212) 867-3550 • FAX: (212) 983-6483 

JOLYON F. STERN, President 
CAROL A. BRESSI, Vice President 



AFFILIATES IN: LONDON • PARIS • MUNICH 



BETACAM-SP ON-LINE 



♦ INTERFORMAT with 3/4" SP, Hi-8, 1/2" 
♦ A/B Roll with Full List Management 
♦ Digital EFX Switcher / Char. Gen. 
♦ DMC Slow Motion / Still Store 
♦ SOHO Loc. / Exp'd Editors 

♦ 3/4", Hi-8, S-VHS, VHS Editing 
♦ XFERS / WINDOW DUBS / DUPS. 

^212.925.1110 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 71 



RUSSIA, CIS & E. EUROPE: Stretch your 
budget! US company in Moscow w/ contacts 
everywhere provides location scouting 6k prod, 
services. Fax: 011-7-095-216-8162 or moscine- 
ma@glas.apc.org. Member A1VF 6k IDA. 

ZOOPARK PRODS, an American/Russian 
company in Moscow w/ experience is willing to 
develop, produce & assist in all facets of produc- 
tion. We are the cheapest alternative working in 
all formats of 16mm, 35mm & Betacam. Fax 011- 
7-095-200-3858; e-mail zoopark@glas.apc.org. 



POSTPRODUCTION 

$10/hr VIDEO VHS EDIT SUITE: $20-3/4", $15 

interf., incl. titles, Amiga & SEG. Also avail.: A6kB 
dubs; computer; photo; slides; audio; mixed media 
prod./postprod.; total S-8 sound film svcs 
editor/training. The Media Loft, 727 6th Ave. (23rd) 
(212) 924-4893. 

16MM CUTTING ROOMS: 8-plate & 6-plate fully 
equipped rooms, sound-transfer facilities, 24-hr 
access. Downtown, near all subways & Canal St. 
Reasonable rates. (212) 925-1500. 



UPTOWN AVID 



Nort IDortntortn Pool \ 



AVID 1000 



AVID 400 




On-line/Off-line 

Beautiful rooms - Low rates 

Pro Tools - 4 channel input/output 

AVR27 

AVID Prices Killing You? Call Code 16: (212) 496-1118 



The Outpost 

Edit on our Media 100 system for just $50 
per hour. That ineludes an operator, various 
tape formats including Beta SP, Macintosh 
and Amiga graphics, and the Video Toaster. 

7 1 S -"599 - 2385 



St . Brooklyn. NY 



16MM FULLY EQUIPPED CUTTING ROOM: 

$6/hr 16 mag transfers also avail, on premises. Avid 
1000 & film composer w/ off-line/on-line capabili- 
ties also avail, for reasonable rates. 24-hr access. 
Chelsea area. (212) 595-5002; (718) 885-0955. 

16MM SOUND MLX only $70/hr! Fully equipped 
mix studio for features, shorts, docs. Bring in your 
cut 16mm tracks, walk out w/ final mix. 16mm 
transfers also avail, from 1/4" Nagra, DAT or CD. 
(Only .055/ft. incl. stock.) Call Tom (201) 807- 
0155. 

16MM & 35MM OPTICAL SOUND 
TRACKS! If you want "High Quality" sound for 
your film, you need a "High Quality" sound nega- 
tive. Contact Mike Holloway, Optical Sound/- 
Chicago Inc., 24 W. Erie, Chicago, II 60610; (312) 
943-1771 or (708) 541-6 



3/4" SONY OFFLINE SYSTEM delivered to you 
& installed: 5850, 5800, RM 440, 2 monitors, 
$500/wk., $l,600/mo. Delivery & installation incl. 
Equipment clean & professionally maintained. 
Thomas (212) 929-2439; (201) 667-9894. 

ATLANTA-FILM/VIDEO POSTPRODUC- 
TION: Serving the no-budget, low-budget film- 
maker. Nonlinear digital picture editing, digital 
audio editing w/ picture lockup. $20/hr w/ editor. 
Contact Cliff Lyttle @ Mecca Digital Postworks, 
(404) 808-7139. 

BETA SP ON-LINE EDITING: $75/hr w/ editor. 
A/B roll, component or composite, wipes, dissolves, 
special EFX, mixer w/ CD 6k cassette players. Edi- 
tor w/ 20 yrs. exp. Non-smoking environment. East 
72nd St. Call Michael or Robin (212) 570-4040. 

BRODSKY & TREADWAY: Film-to-tape mas- 
ters. Reversal only. Regular 8mm, S-8, or archival 
16mm to 1" or Betacam- SE We love early B6kW 6k 
Kodachrome. Scene-by-scene only. Correct frame 
rates. For appointment, call (508) 948-7985. 

GUARANTEED LOWEST RATES in town for 
D/Vision nonlinear and Sony 3/4" off-line editing 
systems. Long/short term rental, your place or ours. 
Creative Thinking, (212) 629-5320. 

INTERFORMAT OFFLINE SUITE (3/4", Hi8, 
VHS). Sony system in clean, spacious uptown loca- 
tion. VO9850/9800 w/ RM450, 2 13" monitors, 
Hi8 6k VHS. Rates: $12/hr, $85/day, $380/wk. 
Editor $15/hr Dubs in 3/4", VHS, Hi8. (212) 316- 
3764. 

INT'L VIDEO TRANSFERS: From US to PAL, 
PAL-M, PAL N, Secam; from PAL, PAL-M, PAL N 
to US. All video formats: VHS, S-VHS, Hi8, 3/4", 
Betacam. Fast, professional, affordable. Gall Barry 
(212) 941-5800. 

SOUND EDITOR/MLXER: Great work, reason- 
able rates. All work guaranteed! Pro Tools dig. 
audio workstation. Sweetening, FX, etc. Talented, 
efficient editor/mixer avail, for all film/video pro- 
jects. References. HIP Studios (212) 629-5251. 

VIDEOTAPE RESTORATION: Obsolete for- 
mats (incl. 1/2" reel to reel 6k 2" Quad), damaged 
6k aging videotape remastered to any format. Film- 
to-tape transfer at $150/hr using Rank Cintel. Full 
equipped/experienced staff. Call VidiPax (212) 
982-5676, ext. 101. 



72 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



NOTICES ARE LISTED FREE OF CHARGE. AIVF MEM- 
BERS & NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS RECEIVE FIRST 
PRIORITY; OTHERS ARE INCLUDED AS SPACE PER- 
MITS. THE INDEPENDENT RESERVES THE RIGHT TO 
EDIT FOR LENGTH. DEADLINES ARE THE 1ST OF THE 
MONTH, TWO MONTHS PRIOR TO COVER DATE (E.G., 
FEBRUARY 1 FOR APRIL ISSUE.) COMPLETE CON- 
TACT INFO (NAME, MAILING ADDRESS & PHONE 
NUMBER) MUST ACCOMPANY ALL NOTICES. SEND 
TO: INDEPENDENT NOTICES, FIVF, 304 HUDSON ST., 
6TH FL, NY, NY 10013. WE TRY TO BE AS CURRENT AS 
POSSIBLE, BUT PLEASE DOUBLE CHECK BEFORE 
SUBMITTING TAPES OR APPLICATIONS. 



Competitions 

MONTEREY COUNTY FILM COMMISSION 
SCREENWRITING CONTEST for writers who 
haven't earned money writing for TV/film. All gen- 
res. $1500 top prize. $35 entry fee. Deadline: Jan. 
31. For rules, send SASE to: MCFC, PO Box 1 1 1, 
Monterey, CA 93942. 

PHILADELPHIA STORIES: 4th Annual "Set in 
Philadelphia" Screenwriting Competition accepting 
submissions nationally for original feature-length 
screenplays set primarily in greater Philadelphia 
metro area. All genres. Awards: $5,000, passes to 
Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema, story notes. 
Postmark deadline: Jan. 10. $20 entry fee. For info, 
send SASE to: PFWC/Screenwriting Competition, 
International House, 3701 Chestnut St., Phila- 
delphia, PA 19104. 

PRIMATOLOGY FILM COMPETITION: 

Awarding best films/videos produced since Jan. 
1990, in both commercial &. ind. categories. Five 
best in each will be screened at meetings of 
International Primatological Society 6k American 
Society of Primatologists. Send 3/4" or 1/2" NTSC 
tape, synopsis, entry fee ($25 non-professional, $50 
professional) 6k return shipping fee ($10 US, $25 
int'l) by March 1 to Charles Weisbard, Box 165, 
Rockefeller University, 1230 York Ave., NY, NY 
10021-6399. For more information call (718) 274- 
2365; fax (212) 327-8634; e-mail weisbac@rock- 
vax.rocketeller.edu. 



Attention Advertisers 

NEW AD OPTIONS 

Beginning with the March issue, classitied 
advertisers will have two options tor ad 
length. For ads up to 240 characters, the 

cost will be $25/issue tor members, 
$35/issue tor nonmembers. Ads of 240- 
480 characters in length will now also be 
available at a cost ot $45/issue tor mem- 
bers, $65/issuc tor nonmembers. 

DISCOUNT FOR MULTIPLE PLACEMENTS 

It you order a classitied run ot at least 5 

issues, there will be a discount ot $5 issue. 

For example, a member's cost to place an 

ad tor 5 issues would be $100, 

rather than $125. 



VIDEO SHORTS COMPETITION is accepting 
entries in general and PSA categories. Cash prizes 
awarded. Entry postmark deadline of Feb 1. For 
details 6k entry forms write: Video Shorts, PO Box 
20369, Seattle, WA 98102; (206) 322-9010. 

WRITERS WORKSHOP NATIONAL SCRIPT- 
WRITING CONTEST is accepting scripts from 
throughout US. 5 to 6 winners will be chosen to 
receive $500 cash award. Winners also receive free 
tuition for critical evaluation of scripts before panel of 
motion picture agents, producers, writers 6k directors. 
Deadline: Ongoing. For submission info, send legal 
size SASE w/ 60(H postage to: Willard Rogers, Writers 
Workshop National Contest, Box 69799, Los 
Angeles, CA 90069; (213) 933-9232. 

Conferences • Seminars 

FILM/VIDEO ARTS EDUCATION DEPART- 
MENT provides quality, hands-on instruction in film 
6k video prod, at reasonable rates 6k offers year-round 
schedule of beginning, intermediate 6k advanced 
courses. Education Department (212) 673-9361. 

THE MEDIA 6k DEMOCRACY CONGRESS, to 

be held in San Francisco on Feb. 29, March 1 6k 2, 
will address the threat to democracy posed by the 
consolidation of media power in the hands of a few 
transnat'l corporations. Papers proposing new media 
systems, products 6k collaborations will be distributed 
beforehand. Contact: Institute for Alternative 
Journalism, 77 Federal St., San Francisco, CA 94107; 
(415) 284-1420; fax: 1414; e-mail: 71362,27@com- 
puserve.com. 

Films • Tapes Wanted 

AIR 6k SPACE NETWORK, a new cable 6k satellite 
TV network, is looking for programs related to avia- 
tion, space, space flight, exploration, astronomy, 
weather, etc. Biographies are also of interest. Fiction, 
nonfiction, docs, educational, informational, or gen- 
eral entertainment. Contact: ASN, 2701 NW 
Vaughn St., ste. 475, Portland, OR 97210-5366; 
(503) 224-9821; fax: 241-3507. 

ART IN GENERAL seeks video works 6k guest- 
curated video programs for new monthly screening 
series. All kinds of work welcome, from experimental 
film 6k video to home videos; doc 6k activist to pub- 
lic access works. Send VHS tape (cued), resume 6k/or 
brief statement 6k SASE. For more info, call Joanna 
Spitzner (212) 219-0473. 

AUSTIN, TEXAS, IND. PRODUCER offering 
cable access venue to showcase ind. films 6k videos, 
all genres 6k subject matter. Send release 6k info 
about film/filmmaker. 1/4" 6k 3/4" preferable. No pay- 
ment, but credit 6k exposure. James Shelton, Tex- 
Cinema Productions, Box 3633, Austin, TX 78764- 
3633; (512) 867-9901. 

AXLEGREASE, a Buffalo cable ,iuc« program of 
ind. film & video, is accepting all genres, under 28 
nunv, 1 2", 3/4", 8mm, I Ii8. Send labeled with name, 
address, title, length, additional into es SASE tor tape 
return to Squeaky Wheel, 175 Elmwood Ave., 
Buffalo, NY 14201. (716) 884-7172; e-mail wheel<§ 
freenet.butf.ilo.edu; WWW: http://freenet. buffalo. 




edu/~wheel/. 

BLACKCHAIR PRODUCTIONS currently 
accepting works of any genre for ongoing "Public 
Exposure" program. Works will be considered for a bi- 
monthly "video-zine," open screenings, galleries, 
clubs, submissions to fests, etc. Let us use our mar- 
keting skills to get your works seen. No fee to submit. 
Send 1/2", Hi8, or 8mm w/ SASE for tape return to: 
Joel S. Bachar, Blackchair Productions, 2318 Second 
Ave., #313-A, Seattle, WA 98121; e-mail: wit- 
erain@nwrain.com. 

BLACK ENTERTAINMENT TELEVISION seeks 
films 6k videos by black ind. makers, directors, or pro- 
ducers for "Black Vision" portion of Screen Scene, 
weekly 1/2-hr show that previews TV lineup 6k latest 
theatrical releases. Contact: Screen Scene, BET 1899 
9th St. NE, Washington, DC 20018; (202) 608-2800. 

BLACK VIDEO PERSPECTIVE, new community 
TV prod, in Atlanta area, seeks works for/by/about 
African Americans. Contact: Karen L. Forest (404) 
231-4846. 

CAFE Y PELICULA looking for films & videos for 
possible monthly exhibition. Students' work wel- 
come. No payment; ongoing deadline. Send 3/4" or 
1/2" with appropriate release, credits, awards 6k per- 
sonal info to: Cafe y Pelicula, PO Box 362991, San 
Juan, PR 00936-2991; e-mail: crubinCcaribe.net. 

CINCINNATI ARTISTS' GROUP EFFORT 

seeks proposals for exhibitions, performances 6k 
audio/video/film works to show in their galleries. 
Experimental, traditional 6k collaborative projects 
encouraged. Contact: CAGE, 1416 Main St., 
Cincinnati, OH 45210; (513) 381-2437. 

CINE CLUB seeks VHS submissions of ind. shorts 
for future programs. Send SASE 6k brief resume to: 
Cine Club c/o Sophie Fenwick, 3 35 Court St., 82, 
Brooklyn, NY 11231. Also welcomes proposals from 
ind. curators 6k others. 

CINEMA VIDEO, monthly showcase ot works by 
ind. video &. filmmakers, seeks S-VHS or VHS sub- 
missions ol any style, content, or length. Cinema 

Video is prod, ot Velvet Elvis Alls Lounge The. Her in 
Seattle, WA, a nonprofit triune theater. Send submis- 
sions to: Kevin Picolet. 2207 E. Republican, Seattle, 
WA98112; (206) 32 3-3 307. 

CINEQUEST, weekly I 2-ht I V series profiling best 

ot md. cinema & video from I'S 6* around world, 
looking tor tilins videos, all genres, less than 20 min. 
to air on 50 min. cable show. Submit on I 2" oi ; 1" 
video. Send pre-paid mailer tor return i ontaci 



Jonuary/Februory 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 73 




278 Babcock St. Boston, MA 02215 
617-254-7882 Phon* - 617-254-7149 Fax 





HIGH Rl 

Graphics & Animation 
for Feature Films, TV Print 

HIGH SPEED 

:"=Q Rendering 




Michael D. McGowan, Producer, Cinequest 
Productions, 2550 Alafayia Trail, Apt. 8100, 
Orlando, FL 32826; (407) 658-4865. 

CITY TV, an Emmy Award-winning, progressive 
municipal cable channel in Santa Monica, seeks pro- 
gramming of any length, esp. works about seniors, dis- 
abled, children, Spanish-lang. 6k video art. Our bud- 
get is limited, but we offer opportunity for producers 
to showcase work. Cablecast rights may be exchanged 
for equip, access. Contact: Lisa Bernard, Pro- 
gramming Specialist, City TV, 1685 Main St., Santa 
Monica, CA 90401; (310) 458-8913. 

CONNECT TV, a new series on ind. videomakers, 
seeks work for 1/2-hr show. Progressive, social issue 
docs, art, humor. Will air on Cablevision of CT Metro 
Video (203) 866-1090. 

CUCARACHA THEATRE seeks 16mm films for 
Tuesday night series in Jan. & Feb. Send 2 tapes to: 
Chris Oldcom/Janet Paparazzo, c/o Cucaracha, 500 
Greenwich St., NY, NY 10013. 

DANCE ON VIDEO wanted for the Spirit of 
Dance, a live, 1 hr monthly program covering all 
types & aspects of dance. Under 5 min. or excerpts 
from longer works. S-VHS preferred. Produced at 
Cape Cod Community Television, South Yarmouth, 
MA. (508) 430-1321; fax: (508) 398-4520. 

DATABASE & DIRECTORY OF LATIN AMER- 
ICAN FILM & VTDEO organized by Int'l Media 
Resources Exchange seeks works by Latin American 
6k US Latino ind. producers. To include work in this 
resource or for info, contact: Karen Ranucci, IMRE, 
124 Washington Place, NY, NY 10014; (212) 463- 
0108. 

DUTV-CABLE 54, a progressive nonprofit access 
channel in Philadelphia seeks works by ind. produc- 
ers. All genres & lengths considered. No payment; 
will return tapes. VHS, S-VHS 6k 3/4" accepted. 
Contact: George McCollough or Maria Mongelli, 
DUTV-Cable 54, Drexel University, 33rd 6k Chesnut 
Sts., Philadelphia, PA 19104; (215) 895-2927. 

FILM PRODUCER SEEKS original or adapted 
comedic screenplays/synopses suited to $300,000- 
$750,000 budgets. Will option; points/prod, position 
possible. Submissions w/ SASE for return to: Infinity 
Pictures, 21 Kent St., Brookline, MA 02146. 

HALCYON DAYS PRODUCTIONS seeks video 
segments, 1-5 min., any genre, by 15- to 25-year-olds 
for video compilation show. If piece is selected, you 
may have chance to be video correspondent for show. 
Submit VHS or Hi8 (returnable w/ SASE) to: Mai 
Kim Holley, Halcyon Days Prod., c/o Hi8, 12 West 
End Ave., 5th fl., NY, NY 10023; (212) 397-7754- 

HERE, a not-for-profit arts organization, seeks sub- 
missions of films & videos for 1995-96 season. 16mm, 
8mm, 3/4", all genres & lengths. Installation propos- 
als also welcome. Send VHS, resume & description of 
work to: HERE, 145 Ave. of the Americas, frnt. 1, 
NY, NY 10013, attn: film/video. Enclose SASE for 
more info, about upcoming season. 

IN THE MIX, nat'l PBS series, seeks short (2-8") 
videos produced by teens or young adults. Any for- 
mat. Send w/ description, name & phone to: In the 
Mix, 102 E. 30th St., NY, NY 10016, attn: student 
videos. 



IN VISIBLE COLOURS FILM & VIDEO SOCI- 
ETY seeks videos by women of color for library col- 
lection. Work will be accessible to members, pro- 
ducers, multicultural groups & educational institu- 
tions. For more info, contact: Claire Thomas, In 
Visible Colours, 1 19 W Pender, ste. 1 15, Vancouver, 
B.C.V6B1S5; (604)682-1116. 

IND. FILM & VIDEO SHOWCASE, cable 
access show; seeks student & ind. films & videos to 
give artists exposure. Send films or video in 3/4" for- 
mat w/ paragraph about artist 6k his/her work. Send 
to: The Independent Film & Video Showcase, 2820 S. 
Sepulveda Blvd. #7, Los Angeles, CA 90064, Attn: 
Jerry Salata. 

LATINO COLLABORATIVE, bimonthly screen- 
ing series seeks works by Latino film/videomakers. 
Honoraria paid. Send VHS preview tapes to: Latino 
Collaborative Bimonthly Screening Series, Vanessa 
Codorniu, 280 Broadway, ste. 412, NY, NY 10007; 
(212) 732-1121. 

NERVOUS IMPULSE, nat'l screening series 
focusing on science, seeks films/videos. Open to 
experimental, non-narrative & animated works 
that address scientific representation or knowledge 
or interplay between science & culture. Send pre- 
view VHS & SASE to: Nervous Impulse, Times 
Square Station, PO Box 2578, NY, NY 10036-2578. 

NEW DAY FILMS, the premiere distribution 
cooperative for social issue media, seeks energetic 
ind. film 6k videomakers w/ challenging social issue 
docs for distribution to nontheatrical markets. Now 
accepting appls for new membership. Contact New 
Day Films, (415) 332-2577. 

THE NEW MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY 

ART 6k the Educational Video Center seek recent 
work that explores youth perspectives on cultural 
identity, relationship, sexuality, health, disabilities, 
family, school, immigration, violence, etc., in genres 
incl. memoir, testimonial, narrative, doc, experi- 
mental 6k public service announcement. Selected 
works will be incl. in fall '96 exhibit at museum. 
Formats: VHS, S-VHS, or 3/4", no more than 15 
min. length. For interactive computer projects: disk 
or written proposal for PC or MAC. Deadline: Jan. 
1. Enclose SASE w/ submission to: Brian Goldfarb, 
Curator of Education, The New Museum of 
Contemporary Art, 583 Broadway, NY, NY 10012. 

NEWCITY PRODUCTIONS seeks completed or 
in-progress docs on all subjects for monthly screen- 
ings. Committed to promoting ind. community by 
establishing forum of new voices. Have professional 
large screen video projector. Send cassettes to 
NewCity Productions, 635 Madison Ave., ste. 1101, 
NY, NY 10022; (212) 753-1326. 

NEWTON TELEVISION FOUNDATION 

seeks proposals on ongoing basis from ind. produc- 
ers. NTF is nonprofit foundation collaborating w/ 
ind. producers on docs concerning contemporary 
issues. Past works have been broadcast on local 6k 
nat'l public TV, won numerous awards 6k most are 
currently in distribution in educational market. 
Contact NTF for details: 1608 Beacon St., Waban, 
MA 02168; (617) 965-8477; email: ntf@tmn.com; 
walshntf@aol.com. 

OFFLINE seeks creative 6k independently pro- 



74 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 



duced videos. The hr-long show airs biweekly on 
public access channels throughout NY State & 
around the country. Submissions should not exceed 
20 min. Longer works will be considered for serial- 
ization. Formats: 3/4", S-VHS, Hi8 or VHS. Incl. 
postage for tape return. OffLine, 203 Pine Tree Rd., 
Ithaca, NY 14850; (607) 272-2613; email: 
72137.3352@compuserve.com. 

THE OTHER SIDE FILM SHOW is looking for 
entries in all cats: narrative, doc, experimental, ani- 
mation, etc. for TV series of ind. films/videos. 
Submissions should be under 30 min. 3/4" video 
preferred, but VHS acceptable. Send w/ SASE for 
tape return to U. of South Florida, Art Dept., 4202 
E. Fowler Ave., Tampa, FL 33620-7350, attn: The 
Other Side. 

OVERWINED PRODUCTIONS, weekly inti- 
mate theater & public access program, seeks con- 
temporary film/video in any format to be showcased 
in & around Detroit area. Contact: Patrick Dennis, 
2660 Riverside Dr., Trenton, Michigan, 48183- 
2807; (313) 676-3876. 

PLANET CENTRAL, new LA-based cable sta- 
tion focusing on the environment, global economy 
&. holistic health, is looking for stories ideas &. 
video footage for new fall alternative weekly news 
program Not in the News. Send info to: Planet 
Central, c/o World TV, 6611 Santa Monica Blvd., 
Los Angeles, CA 90038; (213) 871-9153; fax: 469- 
2193. [i] 

PROGRESSIVE COMMUNICATIONS COL- 
LECTIVE, a newly formed group promoting radi- 
cal ideas & causes in mass media, is seeking 5-20 
min. videos for inclusion in a new program, Channel 
497, sched. to premiere on public access cable in 
Feb. Inquiries to ap206@lafn.org, or PCC, PO Box 
691472, West Hollywood, CA 90069. 

RANDOLPH STREET GALLERY seeks inde- 
pendently produced, innovative music videos for an 
upcoming screening, "Altemawhat: Rejects from 
MTV," featuring work that challenges the perime- 
ters of industry music video prod. Deadline: Jan. 20, 
1996. Send VHS tape, bio materials & SASE to 
Joan Dickenson, Randolph Street Gallery, 756 N. 
Milwaukee, Chicago, IL 60622; (312) 666-7737; 
fax: 8986; e-mail: randlph@merlc.acns.nwu.edu. 

REGISTERED seeks experimental 6k non-narra- 
tive videos about consumerism ck/or modern ritual 
for nationally touring screening. Send VHS for pre- 
view w/ SASE ck short description to: Registered, 
attn. Joe Sola, PO Box 1960, Peter Stuyvesant 
Station, NY, NY 10009. 

RIGHTS & WRONGS, weekly, nonprofit human 
rights global TV magazine series scheduled to 
resume broadcast in Feb. seeks story ideas 6k 
footage for upcoming season. Contact: Danny 
Schechter or Rory O'Connor, exec, producers, The 
Global Center, 1600 Broadway, ste. 700, NY, NY 
10019; (212) 246-0202; fax: 2677. 

SHORT FILM 6k VIDEO: All genres, any medi- 
um, 1 min. to 1 hr. Unconventional, signature work 
in VHS or 3/4" tor n.n'l broadcast! Submit to: 
EDGE TV, 7805 Sunset Blvd., see. 203, Los 
Angeles, CA 90046. 



THE FILM CRAFT LAB 

A DIVISION OF 

Grace & Wild ^^ramaa 



Offering exceptional film 

and video services. 

Processing 

Black & White / Color Negative - 
1 6mm & 35mm 

Black & White / Color Reversal - 
1 6mm & Super 8mm 

Printing 

Black & White / Color Positive - 
16mm & 35mm 

Black & White Reversal- 1 6mm 

Video 

*Tape - to - Film Transfer 
Film - to -Tape Transfer 
Video Duplication 
Standards Conversion 



66 Sibley, Detroit, Michigan 4H201 
Phone: 1313/ 962-2611 
Toll Free: 1/8001 451-6010 

•Ifi' offer a Itro-mbmU' .WAV 16mm color demo 
til \0 (UlARdlifnmi your ritteo Iiijh: 



ROSS-GAFFNEY 

21 west 46th St., 
(212) 719-2744 



*NEW* PROTOOLS III 16 TRK 
DIGITAL MIX with 16 / 35mm / 
video workprint. 

CUTTING ROOMS - 6 or 8 
plate Steenbecks. 

TRANSFERS -1/4", DAT, 
16/35mm, CD, Opticals, 

FILM TO VIDEO TRANSFERS 

One of New York's Oldest / 
Newest / Largest Sound 
Effects and Music libraries. 
Voice over/under. Foleys. 
Lokbox, Soundmaster, 

Camera and Nagra rentals. 
Laserdisc. 

Foreign Language 

Conversion specialists. 

"SERVING INDEPENDENTS 
SINCE 1955" 



T « E Film « Video 

Institute 



Evening and Weekend Courses. 

Courses for everyone from beginners to 
working professionals. 

STARTS MAY 13. 1996! FOR A BROCHURE CALL (202)885-2500; 
OR E-MAIL US AT FILM ©AMERICAN.EDU 



Film 

Television 

Multimedia 
sc Interactive 



Video Producing 
Editing Directing 



ES 



screenwriting 
Documentary 



AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 



w 



O N , 



D C 



t's our 15th year! 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 75 



I 



1 




1 



FIREHOUSE STUDIOS, INC. 

AM Your Audio Needs For Video & Film Post! 

Digital lock to Betacam SP and 3/4" 
Protools ffl, ADAT, Timecode DAT + MIDI 



ADR & voiceover to picture 

Live recording & MIDI to picture 

Sound design, editing, SFX & mixing 

Original music & scoring, Library music selection. 

150 W28th St. Suite 302 212-645-0666 



SURVIVAL 

ENTERTAINMENT 

MOTTO: 




D.R. REIFF 
& ASSOCIATES 



ENTERTAINMENT INSURANCE 

BROKERS 

320 WEST 57 ST 

NEW YORK, NY 10019 

(212)603-0231 FAX (212) 247-0739 



THIRD 

WAVE 

MEDIA 

INC 



SHOOT / EDIT BROADCAST QUALITY AT 
INDEPENDENT RATES. VIDEO FLYER NON 
LINEAR EDITING. SONY BETA SP A IB 
EDITING. TRANSFERS. BUMP UPS. WINDOW 
DUBS. CMX ON LINE MASTERING. DYNAMIC 
MOTION CONTROL. DAT. TOASTER FX/CG/3D 



IKE/SONY BETACAM SP PACKAGE. 3 CHIP HI-8 PLEASANT 

SONY VX3 WITH STEADICAM JR. 3 CHIP S-VHS EAST GO'S 

BR-S41 1 U. EDITORS, CAMERAPERSONS AVAIL. . ftr ATIft M 

CALL FOR PRICES: 212-751-7414 LWVM ' ,VR 



76 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 




STATEN ISLAND COMMUNITY TELEVI- 
SION PRODUCER seeks experimental works, all 
subjects, by ind. video 6k film artists. The more 
explicit, the better; film & video on 3/4" preferred, 
but 1/2" &/or 8mm acceptable. Send tapes to: 
Matteo Masiello, 140 Redwood Loop, Staten 
Island, NY 10309. 

THE SPIRIT OF DANCE, live, 1-hr monthly 
program covering all aspects of dance, seeks 
excerpts under 5 min. from longer works. S-VHS 
preferred. Produced at Cape Cod Comunity 
Television, South Yarmouth, MA. Call producers at 
(508) 430-1321, (508) 759-7005; fax: (508) 398- 
4520. Contact: Ken Glazebrook, 656 Depot St., 
Harwich, MA 02645. 

TOXIC TELEVISION seeks broadcast-quality, 
creative video shorts (under 10 min.) for alterna- 
tive TV experience. Looking for works in anima- 
tion, puppetry, experimental, computers, etc. Send 
VHS or 3/4" tape, SASE & resume to: Tom Lenz, 
6060 Windhover Dr., Orlando, FL 32819. 

UNQUOTE TV, 1/2 hr nonprofit program dedi- 
cated to exposing new, innovative film & video 
artists, seeks ind. doc, narrative, experimental, per- 
formance works under 28 min. Program seen on 
over 40 cable systems nationwide. No payment. 
Submit to: Unquote TV, c/o DUTV, 33rd 6k 
Chestnut Sts., Philadelphia, PA 19104; (215) 895- 
2927. 

URBAN INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPO- 
RARY ARTS is accepting video 6k 16mm film in 
all genres for next season of programming. Fee paid 
if accepted. Send VHS tape w/ SASE to: Film 
Committee, UTICA, 88 Monroe Ave. NW, Grand 
Rapids, MI 49503. 

VIDEO ICON, new TV program focusing on 
innovative video/ film art 6k animation, is current- 
ly reviewing work. Send VHS or S-VHS copy 6k 
SASE. Floating Image Productions, PO Box 66365, 
Los Angeles, CA 90066; (310) 313-6935. 

VIDEOSPACE AT DECORDOVA MEDIA 
ARTS ARCHIVE: DeCordova Museum 6k 
Sculpture Park seeks VHS copies of video art 6k 
documentation of performance, installation art 6k 
new genres from New England artists for inclusion 
in new media arts archive. Send for info 6k guide- 
lines: Videospace at DeCordova, DeCordova 
Museum, 51 Sandy Pond Rd., Lincoln, MA 01773- 
2600. 

WEIRD TV, satellite TV show airing weekly on 
Telstar 302, specializes in alternative viewing. Will 
consider works of 3 min. max., animation or shorts. 
Submit work to: Weird TV, 1818 W.. Victory, 
Glendale, CA 91201; (818) 637-2820. 

WYBE-TV 35, Philadelphia's ind. TV station, 
seeks work for series featuring film 6k video from 
ind. media artists from around the nation. This 10- 
hr, 10-wk series airs in primetime each spring. All 
styles welcome; shorts up to 20 min. preferred. 
Deadline: Jan. 1996. Entry forms avail, from: 
Through the Lens 6, WYBE-TV 35, 6070 Ridge 
Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19128; (215) 483-3900; fax 
6908. 



Publications 

AFRICAN-AMERICAN FILMMAKERS wanted 
to submit resume, bio, filmography, reviews for pos- 
sible inclusion in book by African-American author 
to be published by Greenwood Press. Filmmakers w/ 
significant filmography & w/distributors where work 
can be screened given preference. Author will pay 
nominal fee to screen some work directly from film- 
maker. Contact: Spencer Moon, 766 1/2 Hayes St., 
San Francisco, CA 94102-4132; (800) 615-6290. 
Deadline: March 1. 



Resources • Funds 

BOSTON FILM/VIDEO FOUNDATION seeks 
proposals for fiscal sponsorship from ind. producers. 
No deadline or genre restrictions. Reviewed on an 
ongoing basis. Contact BFAT for brochure: Cherie 
Martin, 1126 Boylston St., Boston, MA 02215; 
(617) 536-1540; fax: 3540; e-mail: bfvf@aol.com. 

CREATIVE PROJECT GRANTS: During this 
fiscal yr, 8 artists will receive grants for 30 hrs of sub- 
sidized use of The Media Loft video/computer suite 
at rate of $7.50/hr, in blocks of at least 5-hr seg- 
ments. Grants awarded on ongoing basis to artists 
doing creative, experimental, narrative, language- 
based, visual, or conceptual video Si/or Amiga com- 
puter work. Political, promotional, doc & commer- 
cial projects are not w/in framework of the grant. To 
apply, send project description, resume, approxi- 
mate dates of proposed use & statement of level of 
video &Uot computer experience to: The Media 
Loft, 727 Ave. of the Americas, NY, NY 10010; 
(212) 924-4893. 

DCTV Artist-in-Residence is now accepting appls 
for $500 worth of equipment access on ongoing 
basis w/in 1 yr. When 1 funded project is complete, 
DCTV will review appls on file & select next pro- 
ject. Pref given to projects already underway. For 
appl., send SASE to: AIR, c/o DCTV, 87 Lafayette 
St., NY, NY 10013-4435. 

THE FINISHING FUNDS PROGRAM of the 

Experimental Television Center will be awarding 
grants ot $500 toward completion costs for elec- 
tronic media & film projects currently in progress. 
Applicants must be NY State residents, and the 
appl. deadline is Mar. 15. The Center also offers a 
residency program for video artists. For appl. forms 
&. addt'l info, contact ETC Ltd., 109 Lower Fairfield 
Rd., Newark Valley, NY 13811; (607) 687-4341. 

HUMANITIES PROJECTS IN MEDIA adminis- 
tered by NEH has canceled the October & March 
deadlines. The new deadline for all appl. categories 
is Jan. 12, 1996. 20 copies of appl. required on or 
before deadline. For appl., guidelines, write: 
National Endowment for the Humanities, Division 
ot Public Programs, Humanities Projects in Media, 
rm. 420, 1 100 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, 
DC 20506; (202) 606-8278; e-mail: mediapro- 
gram(§ neh.fed.us. 

ILLINOIS ARTS COUNCIL (IAC) SPECIAL 
ASSISTANCE ARTS PROGRAM: Matching 
grants of up to $1,500 avail, to IL artists for specific 
projects. Activities that may be funded are: registra- 
tion tees & travel to attend conferences, seminars, 



or workshops; consultant fees for resolution of specif- 
ic artistic problem; exhibits, performances, publica- 
tions, screenings; materials, supplies, or services. 
Funds awarded based on quality of work submitted & 
impact of proposed project on artist's professional 
development. Appls must be received at least 8 wks 
prior to project starting date. Degree students are not 
eligible to apply. Call (312) 814-6750. 

MEDIA ALLIANCE assists NYC artists & nonprof- 
it organizations in using state-of-art equipment, post- 
prod. &. prod, facilities at reduced rates. Contact: 
Media Alliance, c/o WNET, 356 W. 58th St., NY, NY 
10019; (212) 560-2919. 

MEDLANET: A GUIDE TO THE INTERNET 
FOR VIDEO & FILMMAKERS available free at 
http://www.infi.net/~rriddle/medianet.htm, or con- 
tact rriddle@infi.net. 

POLLOCK-KRASNER FOUNDATION gives 
financial assistance to artists of recognizable merit &. 
financial need working as mixed-media or installation 
artists. Grants awarded throughout yr, $1,000- 
$30,000. For guidelines, write: Pollock-Krasner 
Foundation, 725 Park Ave., NY, NY 10021. 

THE PENNSYLVANIA HISTORICAL & MUSE- 
UM COMMISSION invites applicants for 1996-97 
Scholars in Residence Program. The program pro- 
vides support for full-time research 6k study at any 
Commission facility. Residencies are avail, for 4-12 
consecutive wks between May 1, 1996 & April 30, 
1997, at $1,200 per month. Program open to all con- 
ducting research on PA history. Deadline: Jan. 12, 
1996. For more info & appl. materials, contact: 
Division of History, Pennsylvania Historical ek 
Museum Commission, Box 1026, Harrisburg, PA 
17108; (717) 787-3034. 

THE STANDBY PROGRAM is a nonprofit media 
arts organization dedicated to providing artists & 
nonprofit organizations access to broadcast-quality 
video postprod. services at reduced rates. For guide- 
lines & appl.: Standby Program, Box 184, NY, NY 
10012-0004; (212) 219-0951; fax: 0563. 

VIRTUAL FILMFESTIVAL: Join the global com- 
munity lor independent filmmakers on-line at 
http://www.virtualfilm.com and look for us in person 
at IFFCON and the Sundance and Berlin Film 
Festivals. E-mail queries to virtualfest@ cineflix.com. 

VISUAL STUDIES WORKSHOP MEDIA CEN- 
TER in Rochester, NY, accepts proposals on ongoing 
basis for its Media Access program. Artists, ind. pro- 
ducers & nonprofits awarded access at reduced rates, 
prod. 6k postprod. equipment for work on noncom- 
mercial projects. For appl., tour, or more info, call 
(716) 442-8676. 

YADDO invites appls from film/video artists for res- 
idencies of 2 wks to 2 mos at multi-disciplinary artists' 
community in Saratoga Springs, NY. Deadline: Jan. 
1 5 (for May-Feb.). Artistic merit is standard for judg- 
ment. For more info write: The Admissions 
Committee, PO Box 395, Saratoga Springs, NY 
12866; (518) 584-0746. 



AVID. AVID. AVID. AVID. 




PICTURES 



LOW RATES // FABULOUS ROOMS 

ON-LINE // OFF-LINE 

NEW CUSTOMER DISCOUNT 



34 W 17TH STREET 
212 477 4493 



AVID. AVID. AVID. AVID. 



TIRED OF THE YEAR END 
TAX MESS? 

Do you need an accountant whose 
there for you throughout 
the year? f 1 




SOLUTION . . . 

• Preparing your Tax Return 

• Answering your Tax Questions 

• Helping you benefit from the Tax Laws 

• Assisting you in your Bookkeeping 

• Affordable 

SPECIALIZING IN 
• FILM & VIDEO ARTS • 



VASCO ACCOUNTING 

west2othstri:i:t 

SUITE 808 
NEW YORK. NY 1001 1 



TEL:2l2»989»47R9 
FAX: 2r2»989-4tf97 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 77 



MEMORANDA: continued from p. 60 

Contact: Guy Perrotta (203) 831-8205 

Portland, OR: 

Call for dates and locations 

Contact: Grace Lee-Park, (503) 284-5085 

Schenectady, NY: 

When: 1st Wednesday of each month, 6 p.m. 
Where: Media Play, Mohawk Mall 
Contact: Mike Camoin, (518) 895-5269 

St. Louis, MO: 

When: 3rd Wednesday of each month, 7 p.m. 
Where: Midtown Arts, 3207 Washington St. 
Contact: Tom Booth, (314) 776-6270 

Washington, DC: 

When: Tuesday, January 16, 7:00 pm -"Self- 
Distribution"; Thursday, February 15, 7:00 pm - 
"Documentary Filmmaking" 
Wliere: Washington Performing Arts, 400 7th St. 
NW (at D St.) 
Contact: Rebecca Crumlish, (202) 328-8355 

HEY! WHAT ABOUT NEW YORK?? 

Glad you asked. The bad news is that we lost our 
salon space; if a member would like to step for- 
ward and find us a new home for the New York 
salon, we'd be thrilled. The good news is that 
we're starting a different kind of monthly member 
gathering, a works-in-progress screening at the 
office, "In the Works." (See item above for 
details.) For information on screenings, or if you 
want to volunteer to find a new Manhattan water- 
ing hole, call membership coordinator Leslie 
Fields, (212)807-1400x222. 



SCREENING 

ROOM 
AVAILABLE 

Now that we're ensconced in 
our new office, we can proud- 
ly announce an important new service: a small 
screening room which members can rent at very 
reasonable rates to show work to buyers, program- 
mers, family and friends. There is comfortable 
seating for about 25, although more can be 
accommodated if necessary. We have 1/2" and 3/4" 
VCR and monitor, and at press time are working 
on acquiring a screen for 16mm projection as well. 
For information on rates and availability, call 
membership coordinator Leslie Fields at (212) 
807-1400 x 222. 



INSURANCE UPDATE 

Our insurance agent, TEIGET, is required by 
California law to offer a 30-day open enrollment 
period once each year for the CIGNA Health 
plans to all our California members. During the 




open enrollment period any California resident- 
member who applies will be automatically accepted, 
regardless of medical history. 

The open enrollment period will begin January 
1, 1996, and end January 30, 1996. Members may 
request application materials starting now; cover- 
age may begin January 1, February 1, or March 1, 
1996, at the member's option. However, all appli- 
cations must be received by TEIGET prior to the 
requested starting date, and in all cases post- 
marked no later than January 30, 1996. 

There are two CIGNA plans: a conventional 
HMO, and one where you can go to the doctor of 
your choice. For detailed information, contact 
TEIGET at 845 3rd Avenue, New York 10022; 
(212) 758-5675; fax: 888-4916. 

MEMBERABILIA 

Congratulations to Lynn Hershman Leeson, who 

received the Cyberstar award from WDR (Koln, 
Germany) and has been invited to the Frieburger 
Video Forum. 

Several AIVF members have received AFI 
Independent Film and Videomaker Grants in doc- 
umentary and narrative categories: Susana Aiken 
(w/ Carlos Aparcio) for The Transformation, Ross 
McElwee for Tobacco Road, Stanley Nelson for 
The Black Press: Soldiers without Swords, Jane 
Wagner (w/ Tina Difeliciantonio) for Madonna 
Mia, and Yvonne Rainer for MURDER and mur- 
der. 

Rainer also received a grant from the New York 
State Council on the Arts' Individual Artists 
Program. Other recipients include AIVF members 
Esther Podemski (House of the World), Yunah 
Hong {Four Dreams from Far Away), Lexy Lovell 
(Riding the Rails), Katherine Rivera Pieratos 
(Wilma and Nicky), Rea Tajiri (Strawberry Fields), 
JT Orinne Takagi (Pickled Turnips), and Tracie 
Holder (Joe Papp: A Film in Five Acts w/ Karen 
Thorsen), who also received a grant from the 
National Endowment for the Humanities. 

The Retirement Research Foundation has 
awarded two National Media Owl Awards to 
AIVF members. Patricia Resnick received second 
prize in the Television and Theatrical Film Fiction 
category, for Grandpa's Funeral, an intimate and 
comdeic look into a happily dysfunctional family, 
and Harlan Steinberger won first prize in the 
Independent Films and Videotapes category for 
Tibor Jankay: The Art of Survival, profiling a 94- 
year-old artist and Holocaust survivor. 

AIVF members were successful at the New 
England Film & Video Festival, with Benjamin 
Goldman winning the Best of Festival Award for 
730 Grove Street, and other awards going to David 
Sutherland (Out of Sight), Mitch McCabe 
(Playing the Part), Buddy Squires (Listening to 
Children: A Mora! journey with Robert Coles) , Jane 
Gillooly (Leona's Sister Gerri), Nina Davenport 



(Hello Photo), and Robin Hessman (Portrait of 
Boy with Dog). 

The Rockefeller Foundation has announced 
its 1995 Intercultural Film/Video/Multimedia 
Fellowship winners. They include AIVF mem- 
bers Ellen Bruno (Slavegirls) , Jem Cohen (Lost 
Book Found), Lisa Mann (Cat Calls), Salem 
Mekuria (Fragments of a Memorial), Meena 
Nanji (A Net of Jewels), and Jonathan 
Robinson (iOye Familial A Dialogue with 
Society) . 

The 1995 Roy W Dean Grant Award has 
been given to member Lee Lew-Lee, who has 
also finished a production agreement with 
ZDF/Arte for a feature-length documentary 
about the Black Panther party. 

The Experimental Television Center has 
announced recipients of its 1995 Finishing 
Funds. AIVF members Sigrid Hackenberg 
(grass, flares, schoenes wasserfkleines wasser), 
Michelle Lippitt ((Navigating) The Physiology of 
Memory), Rohesia Hamilton-Metcalfe (1/ 
Spring, and Hope, Then Also Winter), and 
Michael Schell (Telephone Calls to the Dead) 
were among the 25 winners. 

AIVF members Tod Solomon Lessing and 
Daniel Alpert not only won first place in the 
Television/Documentary category of the 1995 
Casey Medals for Meritorious Journalism, but 
also received a Bronze Plaque Award at the 
Columbus International Film & Video Festival 
for Growin Up Not a Child, the first part of a 
PBS documentary series. 

The Florida Film Festival Grand Jury award- 
ed a Special Mention award to Craig Baldwin 
for Sonic Outlaws. John G. Young and the late 
Marlon Riggs won audience awards for Best 
Feature (Parallel Sons) and Best Documentary 
(Black Is. ..Black Ain't), respectively. 

The New York Council for the Humanities 
has awarded Marc Fields a development grant 
for his documentary A Mile of Cheap Thrills: A 
Social History of the Bowery, sponsored by City 
Lore, Inc. Boston University awarded its 
Distinguished Alumni Award to Academy 
Award winner and AIVF member Margaret 
Lazarus (Defending Our Lives) . 

The Made for Public Television Award of 
the Great Plains Film Festival was shared by 
Doris Loeser for I'll Ride That Horse '.-Montana 
Women Bronc Riders. Congratulations to all! 



aivfON(2L| Ne 

Find information, technical tips, advocacy 

updates, and member gossip, questions & news 

on AIW'S America OnLine niche. 

KEYWORD: A B B A T E 

Look for AIVF under the 



78 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1996 



The Foundation for Independent Video and Film (FWF), the educational affiliate of the Association for 
Independent Video and Filmmakers (ATVF), supports a variety of programs and services for the independent 
media community, including publication of The Independent, operation of the Festival Bureau, seminars and work 
shops, and an information clearing house. None of this work would be possible without the generous support of 
the AIVF membership and the following organizations: 

The Center for Arts Criticism, Consolidated Edison Company of New "fork, John D. and Catherine T MacArthur 
Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, National Video Resources, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, 
New York Community Trust, New York State Council on the Arts, Rockefeller Foundation, and Andy Warhol Foundation for 
the Visual Arts, Inc. ^^k^^^^^L. 

We also wish to thank the following individuals and organizational members: 

Benefactors: Patrons: Sponsors: 

Irwin W Young Mary D. Dorman Ralph Arlyck, Coulter & Sands, Inc., David W. Haas, 

Jeffrey Levy-Hinte Dr. V Hufhagel/Woman's Cable Network 

James Schamus Julio Riberio, Robert L. Seigel, George C. Stoney 

Business/Industry Members: 

Acordia Hogg Robinson, NY, NY; Asset Pictures, NY, NY; Avid Technology, Tewksbury, MA; Kelli Barraco, Dallas, TX; 
Blackside Inc., Boston, MA; Blue Yonder Films, Tuba, OK; C.A. Prod., NY, NY; Jonathan Cohen, NY, NY; Creative Image 
Enterprises, Miami, FL; Dasistas Creative Group, Madison, WI; Douglas, Gorman, Rothacken, NY, NY; Ericson Media Inc., 
NY, NY; FPG Int'l, NY, NY; Films Transit, Montreal, Quebec; 40 Acres & a Mule, Brooklyn, NY; Greenwood/Cooper Home 
Video, Los Angeles, CA; Irivne Pictures, NY, NY; JVC Prod., NY, NY; KJM3 Entertainment Group, NY, NY; Lonsdale Prod., 
Glendale, CA; Loose Moon Prod, NY, NY; Joseph W. McCarthy, Brooklyn, NY; Mikco, NY, NY; NYTV NY, NY; On Top 
Prod., Haverhill, MA; Passporte Prod., NY, NY; Barbara Roberts, NY, NY; Sandbank Films, Hawthorne, NY; Robert L. Seigel, 
Esq., NY, NY; Shurr Prod., Portland, OR TV 17, Madison, AL; Tellurite Film Fest., Telluride, CO; Tribune Pictures, NY, NY; 
Unapix Entert, Inc.; NY, NY; Video Utah!, Salt Lake City, UT; Washington Square Films, NY, NY; Westend Films, NY, NY; 
White Night Prod., San Diego, CA; WNET/1 3, NY, NY. 



k v^wk 



Nonprofit Members 

ACES Media Arts Cen., New Haven, CT; ACS Network Prod., Washington, DC; AVD Hans Strom Biblioteket, Volda, 
Norway; AVFN Int'l, Anchorage, AK; Alternate Current, NY, NY; The American Cen., Paris, FR; American Civil Liberties 
Union, NY, NY; Ann Arbor Community AccessTV, Ann Arboi; MI; Ann Arbor Film Fest., Ann Arbor, MI; Appalshop, 
Whitesburg, KY; John Armstrong, Brooklyn, NY; Art Matters Inc., NY, NY; The Asia Society, NY, NY; Assemblage, NY, NY; 
Athens Cen. for Film & Video, Athens, OH; Benton Fdn, Washington, DC; Blackside, Inc., Boston, MA; CNC, Washington, 
DC; Carnegie Inst., Pittsburgh, PA; Carved Image Prod., NY, NY; Ceafor Investigative Reporting, San Francisco, CA; Cen. 
for New American Media, NY, NY; Chicago Video Project, Chicago, IL; Coe Film Ass., NY, NY; Colelli Prod., Columbus, OH; 
Columbia College, Chica go, IL ; Command Commun., Rye Brook, NY; Commun. Arts, Old Westbury, NY; Commun. Arts- 
MHCC, Greshamy, ORH Biunity Television Network, Chicago, IL; Denver Film Society, Denver, CO; Duke Univ. 
Durham, NC; Dyke TV NY, NY; Eclipse Gmraun., Springfield, MA; Educational Video Cen., NY, NY; Edwards Films, Eagle 
Bridge, NY; Empow-eniicrrtProjcct/Kaspcr & Trent, Chapel Hill, NC; Eximus Company, Fort Lauderdale, FL; Fallout Shelter 
Prod., Mansfield, OH; Hie Film Crew, Woodland Hills, CA; Fox Chapel High School, Pittsburgh, PA; Great Lakes Film & 
Video, Milwaukee, WI; FIVS, St. Paul, MN; Idaho State Univ., Pratcllo, ID; Image Film Video Cen., Atlanta, GA; Int 
Audk ichrome, Rye, KY; Int'l Cultural Prgm, NY, NY; Int'l Him Seminars, NY, NY; Jewish Film Fest., Berkeley, CA; The Jewish 
Museum, NY, NY; KPBS, San Diego, GA, Komplex Studio Merdeka, Selangor, Malaysia; Little City Fdn./Media Arts, Palatine 
IL; Long Row Group Inc., Brookline, MA; Manhattan Neighrorhixxl Network, NY, NY; Media Arts, Palatine, IL; Media 
Resource Centre, Adelaide, Australia; Mesilla Valley Film Society, Mesilla, NM; Milestone Entertainment, Irving, TX; Mirand 
Smith Pn x.1., ft mlder, CO; Missoula Community Access, Miss >ula MT NAMAC, Oakland, CA; Nat. Cen. for Film 6k Vide 
Preservation, Lis Angeles, CA; Nat. Latino Community Ccnte/KCET Los Angeles, CA; Nat. Video Resources, NY, NY; 
NeighborhcxxJ FilmMdeo Pn >jcct, Philadelpl lia, PA; Neon, Inc., NY, N't'; New Image Pn >d., Las Vegas, NV; New Liberty Prod. 
Philadelphia, PA; NY li u. . >t Icchnologv, Okl Westbury, NY; Ohi . Arts Council. G ilumbus, OH; Ohio Univ., Athens, OH 
One Highly ( "hie Prod., NY, NY; Outside in July, NY, NY; Rermsylvania State Univ., Univ. Park, PA; Pittsburgh Filmmakers, 
Pittsburgh, PA; II >;r Modern Pmrl., Ftah, IT.; Pro Videographcrs, Morton Grove, IL; Promontory Point Films, Albany, NY; 
Rainy States Film j^^gattlc^WA; Medina Rich, NY, NY; Paul Robeson Fund/Funding Exchange, NY, NY; Ross Fil 
'Ilieater, Lincoln, ME; Ross-Gafaey, NY, NY; San 1 Tuucixo An Inst., San Francisco, CA; Schixil of the Art Inst., Chicago, IL; 
Sc rik- Vtdet > ( Vi i, Philadelphia, PA; Southwest Alternate Medi. i I Y< >jccr, H< mston, TX; Squeaky Wheel, Buffalo, NY; Strati 
Films, i lollywixnL,CA; Sundance frur., Los Angeles, CA; SUN :Y Buffalo- 1 Vpt. Media Studies, Buffalo, NY; Swiss Inst., NY, 
NY; Icrrai clilntf, BtooI Ivi i, N Y; II h irston ( a niiinuniryTdevlsion Archive, Los Angeles, CA; Triniry Square Video, Toronto, 
Ontario; TucsonM jnpunity C 'ahleCofe Tucson, AZ; UCLA Film 6k Television Archive, Lis Angeles, CA; UMAB/Sckxil 
of Social Work Mafia ("-en., RiltiiiKJre.Ml \ I 'niv.ot /\n:ona, Tucson, AZ; Univ. ofHawaii, Honolulu, HI; Univ. ofNcbraska, 
Lincoln, NF; Univ. ot Southern Flijnda, I. imp, i, II.; Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI; VA Fest. of American Fil 
( :harlotte.s\ ilk , VA; VIEW. Video, NY, NY; V u k . « i\ er him S. In . .1, V n k . >i iver, R( .'; Veritas Intl, Ekah, IL; Video Data Rink, 

Chicago, II , Video Pool, Wiraiipeg. Manitoba; WNbT/ii. \'i ',. ■.'• I IV • in. ,■■■.,( In, :■■,.. II . \\ I I, ,IK Il'uhl,, 

Access, West Hoflvwrwxi CA; W'cxner Cm., Columbus, 01 I. W;.tui-n Make Movies, NY, NY; York Univ. Libraries, Nort 
York, Ontario. 





212.982.2690 
212.982.2685 



T YOUR HANDS 
ON A 5MOKIN 

AVIP 



• EXPERIENCED EDITORS. 

•15% DISCOUNT FOR 
INDIE FILMMAKERS!! 

J7 FIRST AVENUE 
SUITE 
NEW YORK. NY 1000J 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 79 




A^femoranda. 




by Pamela Calvert 



WINTER EVENTS 

PANEL DISCUSSION - SMALL FORMAT 
VIDEO: THE FUTURE OF DOCUMENTARY? 

Presented at Showbiz Expo '96 

Small format video documentary is enjoying a 
place in the sun right now, from the Sundance 
success and theatrical release o( Jupiter's Wife to 
the new PBS series E.C.U. Is this just a sign of the 
lean-and-mean times, or the shape of things to 
come? Panelists will explore the technical, finan- 
cial, formal, and political challenges at the van- 
guard of the camcorder revolution. You'll also see 
demos of some of the new equipment reaching 
the market right now. 

Moderator: Pamela Calvert, Director of Programs 
and Services, AIVF/FIVF. Panelists: Doug Block 
(co -producer, Jupiter's Wife; co -producer, Silver - 
lake Life: The View from Here; producer/director, 
The Heck With Hollywood!); Judith Helfand (co- 
producer, The Uprising of '34, producer/director, A 
Healthy Baby Girl); David Leitner (associate pro- 
ducer, The Gate of Heavenly Peace; director, Vienna 
Is Different; co -producer, For All Mankind; former 
technical director, DuArt Film Laboratory) ; Ellen 
Schneider (executive producer, E.C.U. ; executive 
director, The American Documentary) . 

When: Saturday, January 6, 10:00 a.m. 
Where: Showbiz Expo, New York Hilton 
Price: $28 advance; $35 on-site 

AIVF members receive complimentary VIP admission 
to Showbiz Expo, but you must register for panels and 
seminars separately. We have passes and registration 
materials in the office, or you may call Showbiz Expo 
directly: (800) 331-5706. 

"IN THE WORKS" 
OPEN SCREENING PROGRAM 

Responding to popular de- 
mand, we are starting a works - 
in-progress program for members. 
We'll be combining open screening programs with 




ones featuring invited works, and developing it 
month-by-month to serve the needs and interests 
of the members. Our first two are scheduled for 
January 16 and February 20 at 7:00 p.m. in our 
offices. So call membership coordinator Leslie 
Fields to show your work, or come and see what's 
in the pipeline. Five 10-minute slots per evening will 
be assigned on a first-registered, first-served basis, and 
are available to AIVF members only. You do not need 
to register or be a member to attend. 
When: Tuesday, January 16; Tuesday, February 
20, 7:00 p.m. 
Where: AIVF office 
Contact: Leslie Fields, (212) 807-1400 x 222 

MEET AND GREETS 

These are opportunities for members to meet pro- 
ducers, distributors, funders, programmers, and 
others to exchange information in an informal 
atmosphere at the AIVF offices. Free; open to 
AIVF members only. RSVP required. 

FISCAL SPONSORS 

A different kind of meet and greet! Find out how 
your production can become eligible for grants 
through nonprofit fiscal sponsorship. Representatives 
of the New York Foundation for the Arts, Women 
Make Movies, Third World Newsreel, Millen- 
nium, and Media Network will provide information 
on their sponsorship programs, project acceptance cri- 
teria, services and fees. 
Tuesday, March 5, 6:30 pm 

SUSAN GLATZER 

Director of Acquisitions, October Films 
Film distribution company representing indepen- 
dent features in North American markets. 
Thursday, March 14, 6:30 pm 

SPECIAL BOSTON EVENT 

We have three special events to announce for 
February in Massachusetts, co-sponsored by 
AIVF/FIVF and the Newton Television 
Foundation. First, a book launch party for our 
new edition of The Next Step: Distributing 
Independent Films and Videos, at NTF on Friday 
evening, February 2. AIVF staff will attend, 
joined by the book's omnitalented editor, Morrie 
Warshawski. Then, on Saturday February 3, 
Morrie will lead an all-day fundraising workshop 
in Boston based on his best-selling Shaking the 
Money Tree: How to Get Grants and Donations for 
Film and Video. And finally, the workshop will be 
repeated on Sunday, February 4 at Hampshire 
College. Thanks to the generous support of the 
Massachusetts Council on the Arts, the work- 
shops can be offered at the extraordinarily low 
price of $20! For more information or to register, 
call Susan Walsh at Newton Television 
Foundation, (617) 965-8477. 



OFFICE ORIENTATION 

Come to our office to learn about the organiza- 
tion's services, meet the membership program 
staff, and be introduced to the resource library. 
RSVP appreciated. 

When: Tuesday, February 13, 6:00 pm. 
Where: AIVF Office 

Transit information to the new office: We are at 304 
Hudson St., 6th fl., on the east side of the street 
between Spring and Vandam, four blocks south 
of Houston. (Hudson is the equivalent of 8th 
Ave., on the west side of lower Manhattan.) The 
nearest subways are: C or E to Spring St., walk 2 
blocks west to Hudson; 1 or 9 to Houston, walk 
1 block west to Hudson and 4 blocks south to 
Spring. 

"MANY TO MANY" 
MONTHLY MEMBER SALONS 

This is a monthly opportunity for members to 
discuss work, meet other independents, share 
war stories, and connect with the AIVF commu- 
nity across the country. Note: Since our copy 
deadline is two months before the meetings list- 
ed below, be sure to call the local organizers to 
confirm that there have been no last-minute 
changes. 

Austin, TX: 

Call for dates and locations. 
Contact: Ben Davis, (512) 708-1962 

Boston, MA: 

Call for dates and locations 
Book launch party at Newton Television 
Foundation for The Next Step: Distributing 
Independent Films and Videos, and Shaking the 
Money Tree workshops in Boston and Western 
Mass. with Morrie Warshawski February 2-4! 
Contact: Susan Walsh (617) 965-8477 

Brooklyn, NY: 

Call for dates and locations 

Contact: Glenn Francis Frontera, (718) 646- 

7533 

Dallas, TX: 

When: 3rd Wednesday of each month, 7 p.m. 

Where: Call for locations. 

Contact: Bart Weiss, (214) 823-8909 

Kansas City, MO: 

Call for dates and locations 

Contact: Rossana Jeran, (816) 363-2249 

Los Angeles, CA: 

When: 1st Wednesday of each month, 7 p.m. 
Where: Swing Cafe, 8543 Santa Monica Blvd. 
Contact: Pat Branch, (310) 289-8612 

Norwalk, CT: 

Call for dates and locations 

Continued on p. 78 



80 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1 996 




We do it all, from A to 2. 

• Post-production • Duplication 

• Customization • Distribution 



From editing to broadcast and high volume VHS duplication 

to distribution - whatever your needs, Video Dub does it for you! 

So call us today, and get the whole job done. 




mm 



VIDEO DUB INC. 



423 West 55th Street, New York, NY 10019 (212) 757-3300 
235 Pegasus Avenue, Northvale, NJ 07647 (201) 767-7077 

A Video Services Corporation Company 

1-800-88-DUB-IT 



January/February 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 81 



January 1, 1996 



Independents line up for bargain rates 
at DCTV & Electric Film! 




Downtown Community TV Center 
and Electric Film are located at 
87 Lafayette Street, New York, NY 10013 
fax (212)219-0248 



New York- 
DCTV's free classes 
and low cost equip- 
ment access have 
been attracting huge 
crowds to the histor- 
ic firehouse on 
Lafayette Street. 

When DCTV 

announced almost 
free Avid instruction 
& editing,commun- 
ity producers packed 
the sidewalk trying 
to get into the newly 
renovated building. 

Despite warnings 
from the police, 
Electric Film has 
simultaneously 
opened newly in- 
stalled Avid off-line 
and on-line editing 
suites with res 27 & 
amazing 3D-DVE. 
Interformat suite 
and inexpensive 
Betacam packages 
already make crowd 
control a daily prob- 
lem. People can 
call DCTV at 
1-800- VIDEONY 
or (212)966-4510 
& Electric Film at 
1-800-TAPELESS 
or (212)925-3429. 



the 



Im MARCH 1996 Hj 



$3.75 us $5.00 can 





«£•*■**" 



V- •*'% 




-^W^&feA.: v 




■ft 



V 



Going HOG WILD on the 

Campaign Trail 



Rich 

Six decades on the, 
frontlines of documi 



1\M 



RT71 



nf/f 

TH-i 



•'Ww&BmJ$ 









^., 



03 






"7^70"801 H ' 6 







FOUNDATION 

foi murium 

VIDEO A«B fill 



w 



used to be a headache. Now one call to Archive gets you 

a healfhy choice of 14,000 hours of foofage and 20,000,000 srills. 

Tell us whaf you need - we'll roll up our sleeves, poke around and find if. 

Cataloged, copyrighr-cleared, and ready for you fo use. Wifh fhousands of images 

already available in digifal formaf. (Jusf whaf fhe doctor ordered, righf?] 



•V-vfe- 



* ■ 



o 



V 






X 



Fax us on your letterhead 

for a free brochure and sample reel. 

And check ouf our on-line databases 

on Foorage.ner and on CompuServe. 



Your One Call To History: 

800-466-0115 



53D W. 25th Street, New York, NY 1DD11 Tel. (212) 62D-3955 Fax (212) 645-2137 




British Movietone News was there! 

And now it's here! 






ABCNEWS VideoSource™ adds British Movietone News 
to its new tape and film historical footage library. 



British Movietone News, regarded as one of the finest 35mm newsreel collections in existence, 
joins with ABC News and Worldwide Television News (WTN) to offer unparalleled coverage of the events 
of our time. 

The Movietone coverage of the most historic and newsworthy events all over the world begins in 
1929. It has been carefully transferred from high quality 35mm film into Beta videotape and is now 
available in all tape formats. 



The fastest, easiest way to get the exact footage you want 



ABCNEWS VideoSource is a state-of-the-art news and stock footage center housed in a brand- 
new facility designed for this specific purpose. 

Our Customer Service Representatives will help you locate the footage you're searching for in 
our proprietary computerized footage database. Time-coded viewing cassettes can be rushed to you for 
immediate evaluation. 



Come to the source or call on the phone! 1-800-789-1250 



©ABCNEWS 

VideoSource 

1 25 West End Avenue at 66th Street • New York, NY 10023 



the • 



independent 




MARCH 1996 

VOLUME 19, NUMBER 2 

Publisher: Ruby Lerner 

Editor: Patricia Thomson 

Managing Editor: Sue Young Wilson 

Editorial Assistant: Adam Knee 

Intern: Tomio C. Geron 

Contributing Editors: Kathryn Bowser, Luke Hones, 

Barbara Bliss Osborn, Robert L. Seigel, Esq. 

Art Director: Daniel Christmas 

Advertising: Laura D. Davis (212) 807-1400 

National Distribution: Total Circulation (Manhattan) 

(201) 342-6334; Fine Print (800) 874-7082; Ingram 

Periodicals (800) 627-6247 

Printed in the USA by Lancaster Press 

The Independent Film & Video Monthly (ISSN 0731- 
5198) is published monthly except February and 
September by the Foundation for Independent Video and 
Film (FIVF), a nonprofit, tax-exempt educational founda- 
tion dedicated to the promotion of video and film. 
Subscription to the magazine ($45/yr individual; $25/yr 
student; $75/yr library; $100/yr nonprofit organization; 
$150/yr business/industry) is included in annual mem- 
bership dues paid to the Association of Independent 
Video and Filmmakers (AIVF), the national trade associ- 
ation of individuals involved in independent film and 
video, 304 Hudson St., NY, NY 10013, (212) SOT- 
MOO; fax: (212) 463-8519; aivffivf@ aol.com. Second 
Class Postage Paid at New York, NY, and at additional 
mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to 
The Independent Film & Video Monthly, 304 Hudson 
St., NY, NY 10013. 

Publication of 77?e Independent is made possible in 
part with public funds from the New York State Council 
on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts, a 
federal agency. 

Publication of any advertisement in The Independent 
does not constitute an endorsement. AIVF/FIVF are not 
responsible for any claims made in an ad. 

Letters to The Independent should be addressed to 
the editor. Letters may be edited for length. 

All contents are copyright of the Foundation for 
Independent Video and Film, Inc. Reprints require writ- 
ten permission and acknowledgement of the article's pre- 
vious appearance in The Independent. The Independent 
is indexed in the Alternative Press Index. 

© Foundation for Independent Video and Film, Inc. 
1996 

AIVF/FIVF staff: Ruby Lerner, executive director; Ellen 
Barker, resource/development director; Cleo Cacoulidis, 
advocacy coordinator; Pamela Calvert, director of pro- 
grams and services; Leslie Fields, membership coordina- 
tor; Judah Friedlander, membership associate; Johnny 
McNair, information services associate; Leslie Singer, 
director of administration; Lisa Deanne Smith, 
resource/development associate. 

AIVF/FIVF legal counsel: Robert L. Freedman, Esq., 
Leavy, Rosensweig & Hyman 

AIVF/FIVF Board of Directors: Carrol Parrott Blue, 
Melissa Burch, Loni Ding, Barbara Hammer, Ruby Lerner 
(ex officio), James Klein, Diane Markrow, Robb Moss, 
Robert Richter, James Schamus*, Norman Wang*, 
Barton Weiss, Debra Zimmerman, Susan Wittenberg. 

* FIVF Board of Directors only 




26 Leacock's Life Lessons 

Richard Le acock and coproducer Valerie Lalonde talk about 
their new videos and his 60 years of documentary production. 

by George Fifield 



32 The Campaign Game 

Some politicans play the campaign game on TV. Some play it 
on the streets, block by block, handshake by handshake. 
But whichever new or tried-and-true way candidates chase 
votes, it's sure to be found in Vote for Me: Politics in America, 
a three-part series about the culture of political campaigns. 
Three stalwart independents — -Louis Alvarez, Andrew Kolker, 
and Paul Stekler — are behind this series, which will cap off 
PBS's election-year programming next fall. 

by Patricia Thomson 




2 THE INDEPENDENT March 1996 





6 AIVF Advocacy 

by Cleo Cacoulidis 

9 Media News 

Public TV Charts Survival 
Course 

by Gary O. Larson 

Save that Video! Library of 
Congress Holds Hearings 

by Deirdre Boyle 

Hoop Dreams Director 
Funds Home Team 
Filmmakers 

BY SONIA SABNIS 

One Less Pain in the IRS 

by Susan Lee 

16 Wired Blue Yonder 

Site Seeing: 

Indie Movie Making on the 

World Wide Web 

by Andrew Giannelli & 
Sue Young Wilson 

Gender Bender: Cyber 
Theorist Sandy Stone 

by Nancy Bless 




20 





40 



42 

48 
52 
62 



Field Reports 

Florida Flicks: 
The Fort Lauderdale 
International Film Festival 

by Michalene Seiler 

Milne 

Collective Insights: 
Four Groups That Have 
Withstood the Test of Time 

by Deborah Reber 

In & Out 
of Production 

by Adam Knee 

Festivals 

by Kathryn Bowser 

Classifieds 
Notices 

Memoranda 

Minutes of the AIVF/FIVF 
Board of Directors Meeting 

BY Pamela Calvlr i 



COVER: Straight outta central casting: Buddy 
Ciansi, five-time mayor of Providence. Rl, 
with a constitutent. See Buddy run in Vote For 
Me: Politics in America, a three-part series 
on the culture of political campaigns. 

Photo courtesy the Center for New 
American Media 



March 1 996 THE I N E P E DENT 3 




We do it all, from A to 2 

• Post-production • Duplication 

• Customization • Distribution 



From editing to broadcast and high volume VHS duplication 

to distribution - whatever your needs, Video Dub does it for you! 

So call us today, and get the whole job done. 




ms 



VIDEO DUB INC. 



423 West 55th Street, New York, NY 10019 (212) 757-3300 
235 Pegasus Avenue, Northvale, NJ 07647 (201) 767-7077 

A Video Services Corporation Company 

1-800-88-DUB-IT 



4 THE INDEPENDENT March 1996 



TheGlobolCammunity far Independent Film 

www. virtual! ilm . com 




Jive in do 



FILM GROUP 



e-mail: info@virtualfilm.com 



March 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 5 




YOUR VOTE 
IS YOUR 

VOICE. 

REGISTER 
NOW. 

VOTE! 



For more 
information about 
how you can help 

Call 

Vote USA/ 
Human SERVE 



21 2-854-4053 



Advocacy Groups 

The '96 elections offer a chance for artists, arts orga- 
nizations and audiences to fight back and reverse 
some of the recent damage done to public arts fund- 
ing. Now is the time to join forces and advocate for a 
public sector commitment to arts and culture. Get 
involved. The following advocacy organizations are a 
good place to start: 

Access For All 

Mona Jimenez: Media Alliance (212) 560-2919 

Barry Lasky: Artswire (212) 366-6900 

An ad hoc coalition of diverse media and public interest 
groups in New York working toward a more equitable dis- 
tribution of communications resources. The group holds 
workshops and meetings on a regular basis. 

Alliance for Community Media (ACM) 
Executive Director: Barry Forbes 
666 11th Street, N.W., Suite 806 
Washington, D.C. 20001-4542 
(202) 393-2650; fax: (202) 393-2653 
AllianceCM@aol.com 

ACM represents the interests of over 950 public, educa- 
tional and governmental (PEG) access organizations, 
local origination cable TV stations, government regula- 
tors, libraries, and other nonprofit groups dedicated to 
providing electronic media access. Publishes several pam- 
phlets, books and directories, as well as a bi-monthly 
media review. ACM also hosts an annual conference. 

American Arts Alliance (AAA) 

Acting Executive Director: Lee Kessler 

1319 F Street, N.W., Suite 500 

Washington, D.C. 20004 

(202) 737-1727; fax: (202) 628-1258 

aaa@artswire.org; WWW address: http:\\www. 

tmn.com/Artswire/www/aaa/aaahome.html 

AAA is an advocate for more tlian 2,600 nonprofit arts 
institutions nationwide focusing on such issues as NEA 
funding, freedom of expression & increased federal fund- 
ing for the arts. Publishes a monthly legislative update. 

American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) 

Director: Marjorie Heins 

Arts Censorship Project 

132 West 43rd Street 

New York, N.Y. 10036 

(212) 944-9800; fax: (212) 869-4314 

The ACLU is a public interest organization devoted to 
protecting basic civil liberties. The Arts Censorship 
Project engages in legal advocacy and public education in 
defense of artistic freedom on such issues as arts funding, 
censorship of the electronic media, and obscenity laws. 

American Council for the Arts (ACA) 

Director of Programs: Lissa Rosenthal 

1 East 53rd Street, 2nd fl. 

New York, NY 10022-4201 

(212) 223-2787; fax: (212) 223-4415 

WWW address: http://www.artsusa.org/ 

ACA's mission is to promote public policies that advance 
and document the contributions of the arts and artists to 
American life. Through its Arts USA website, Arts USA 
Update Publication, FaxAlert Service, and its annual 



Advocacy Day, ACA helps to mobilize immediate 
constituent response to pending arts legislation. 

Artswire (at New York Foundation for the Arts) 

Barry Lasky, David Green 

155 Avenue of the Americas, 14th fl. 

New York, N.Y. 10013 

(212) 366-6900; fax: (212) 366-1778 

WWW address: http://www.artswire.org/Artswire 

www/awfront.html 

A nationwide communications network. Creates an 
on-line space for discussion and advocacy about arts 
and cultural issues. 

Association of Independent Video & Filmmakers 

(AIVF) ; Executive Director: Ruby Lerner 

304 Hudson Street, 6th fl. 

New York, N.Y. 10013 

(212) 807-1400; fax: (212) 463-8519 

aivffivf@aol.com; WWW address: http://www.vir- 

tualfilm.com/AIVF 

With a membership of over 5,000 independent media 
producers, AIVF is a leading advocate for indepen- 
dents' access to public and private funding, and to dis- 
tribution opportunities through public television and 
cable systems, as well as to theaters, museums, gal- 
leries, educational institutions and community organi- 
zations across the country. Advocates for equitable 
access to all resources. Through its affiliate, the 
Foundation for Independent Video and Film (FIVF) , 
the organization publishes several resource guides and 
this monthly magazine, The Independent. 

Benton Foundation 

Andrew Blau, David Weiner 

1634 Eye Street, N.W 

Washington, D.C. 20006 

(202) 638-5770; fax: (202) 638-5771 

benton@benton.org; WWW address: http:// 

cdinet.com/benton 

The Benton Foundation's Communications Policy 
Project promotes public interest values and noncom- 
mercial services for the National Information 
Infrastructure (Nil) through research, policy analysis, 
print, video, and on-line publishing, and does outreach 
to nonprofits and foundations. Provides on-line advo- 
cacy updates on telecommunications issues. 

Center for Media Education 
Executive Director: Jeffery Chester 
1511 K Street, N.W, Suite 518 
Washington, D.C. 20005 
(202) 628-2620; fax: (202) 628-2554 

Advocates for the democratic use of electronic media. 
Three current projects: Campaign for Kids, Television; 
Children & the Information Superhighway; The 
Future of Media. Publishes numerous articles and 
papers on telecommunications policy as well as a quar- 
terly newsletter. 

Media Access Project (MAP) 

Andrew Schwartzman, Gigi Sohn & Jill Lesser 

2000 M Street, N.W. 

Washington, D.C. 20036 

(202) 232-4300; fax: (202) 466-7656 

MAP is a public interest telecommunications law firm 
that represents the rights of members of the public to 



6 THE INDEPENDENT March 1996 



speak and receive information free of censorship and 
with unfettered access. Communications policy litiga- 
tion at the Federal Communications Commission 
(FCC) and in federal court. 

Media Coalition 

Executive Director: Chris Finan 

139 Fulton Street, Suite 302 

New York, NY 10038 

(212) 587-4025; fax: (212) 587-2436 

An and- censorship group that represents trade associa- 
tions in the publishing, book selling, recording and video 
industries. Publishes occasional reports on censorship. 

MeDIA Consortium 

Project Director: David Le Page 

4302 Halfe Street 

Alexandria, Virginia 22309 

(703) 780-1160 voice/fax 

mediacnsrt@aol.com 

MeDIA is a national consortium representing indepen- 
dent, minority and community media and arts service 
organizations and individuals. MeDIA's mission is to 
promote freedom of expression, and to advocate for 
equity and access in telecommunications and media 
arts policy. 

National Alliance for Media Arts & Culture 

(NAM AC); National Director: Julian Low 

655 13th Street, Suite 201 

Oakland, California 94612 

(510) 451-2717; fax: (510) 451-2715 

NAMAC, which represents 200 diverse media arts 
groups, focuses on making media arts organizations an 
integral part of the community, while promoting media 
literacy and the humane uses of, and individual access 
to, current and future media technologies, and encour- 
aging a global outlook in the media community. 
Publishes a monthly bulletin, provides information on 
the media arts and hosts bi-annual conferences. 

Native American Public Telecommunications, Inc. 

(NAPT); Executive Director: Frank Blythe 

1800 North 33rd Street 

Lincoln, Nebraska 68583 

(402) 472-3522; fax: (402) 472-8675 

rblythcC" unlinfo.unl.edu 

The mission of NAPT is to inform, educate and 
encourage the awareness of tribal histories, cultures, 
languages, opportunities and aspirations through the 
participation of American Indians and Alaska Natives 
in creating and employing all forms of educational and 
public telecommunications programs and services. 
NAPT publishes a quarterly newsletter. 

National Artists Advocacy Group (NAAG) 

Contact Person: Helen Brunner 

918 F Street, N.W, Suite 610 

Washington, DC. 20004 

(202) 393-2787; fax: (202) 347-7576 

NAAG is a confederation of diverse organizations of 
artists, cultural workers and audiences focused on 
building a cohesive, progressive movement to fight the 
attacks on artists and culture at the local, state & 
national level. Advocates around issues oj freedom a) 
expression, information superhighway, intellectual 
property & copyright, health care & public arts fund- 



ings. NAAG will be joining forces with other organiza- 
tions during the '96 election year to register voters and 
provide voter education. 

National Asian American Telecommunications 

Association (NAATA) 

Executive Director: DeeAnn Borshay 

346 Ninth Street, 2nd fl. 

San Francisco, California 94103 

(415) 863-0814; fax: (415) 863-7428 

National media arts organization that supports work that 
is by and about Asian Americans and Asians. Three 
main areas of focus: public TV programming; education- 
al distribution; exhibition. Publishes quarterly newsletter. 

National Association of Artists' Organizations 

(NAAO) ; Director: Helen Brunner 

918 F Street N.W., Suite 611 

Washington, D.C. 20004 

(202) 347-6350; fax: (202) 347-7376 

naao@artswire.org 

NAAO serves and promotes artist-run organizations and 
advocates for artistic freedom of expression. Publishes 
quarterly bulletin and bi-annual directory, and provides 
fax alerts on arts issues. 

National Black Programming Consortium (NBPC) 

Executive Director: Mable Haddock 

929 Harrison Avenue, Suite 101 

Columbus, Ohio 43215 

(614) 299-5355; fax: (614) 299-4761 

NBPC@supptec.com.; WWW address: WWW.- 

SUPPTEC.COM/BUSINESS/NBPC. 

NBPC is a nonprofit organization that focuses on foster- 
ing and encouraging programming about Black people 
worldwide. NBPC funds several new projects a year and 
offers these programs for presentation to the PBS nation- 
til primetime schedule. Publishes two quarterly newslet- 
ters: Take I and Take II. 

National Campaign for Freedom of Expression 

(NCFE); Executive Director: David Mendoza 

918 F Street, N.W, Suite 609 

Washington, D.C. 20004 

(202) 393-2787; fax: (202) 347-7376 

West coast office: 

1402 Third Avenue, Suite 421 

Seattle, Washington 98101 

(206) 340-9301 

dmendoza(3 artswire.org & jwood(3 arts wire.org 

WWW Address: http://www.tmn.com/Artswire/ 

www/ncfe/ncfe.html 

NCFE is an education and advocacy network of artists, 
arts organizations and the public, founded to jiglu censor- 
ship and to protect First Amendment rights to freedom of 
artistic expression. NCFE produces a quarterly buUetin 
and legislative update videos. 

Free Expression Network (FEN) 
An ctcl hoc coalition oj groups that meet every 8 to 10 
weeks. Operates out oj NCFE office. Distributes the Free 
Expression Resource Director)'. 

National Federation oi Community Broadcasters 

(NFCR); Director: Lynn Chadwick 
Fort Mason Center, Building D 
San Francisco, California 94 1 1 5 



(415) 771-1160; fax: (415) 771-4343 
NFCB@aol.com 

A national membership and service organization for com- 
munity radio. Represents 200 member stations and the 
field to national policy and funding organizations, like the 
Federal Communications Commission and the Corpor- 
ation for Public Broadcasting. Publishes monthly newslet- 
ter, public radio legal handbook & a production textbook. 

National Latino Communications Center (NLCC) 
Executive Director: Jose Luis Ruiz 
3171 Los Feliz Boulevard, Suite 201 
Los Angeles, California 90039 
(213) 663-8294; fax: 663-5606 

Established in 1975, the NLCC is the only nonprofit 
media arts production resource center in the country ded- 
icated solely to creating access for, and providing funding 
support to, Latino media artists in public broadcasting. 
NLCC is the largest single supplier of Latino program- 
ming for public television. To date, over 60 projects have 
been funded, including dramas, documentaries and per- 
formance works. 

Pacific Islanders in Communications (PIIC) 

Executive Director: Lurline McGregor 

1221 Kapi'olani Boulevard, Suite 6A-4 

Honolulu, Hawaii 96814 

(808) 591-0059; fax: (808) 591-1114 

piccom@elele.peacesat.hawaii.edu 

PIIC is a nonprofit national media organization whose 
goal is to increase nationally broadcast public television 
programs produced by indigenous Pacific Islanders about 
the cultures and the peoples of the Pacific Islands, includ- 
ing Hawaii, Guam, American Samoa, the Northern 
Marianas, the Republic of Palau, the Federated States of 
Micronesia and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. 
PIIC assists in the marketing and distribution of Pacific 
Islander projects. 

People for the American Way/Artsave (PFAW) 

Director: Anne Green 

2000 M Street, N.W, Suite 400 

Washington, D.C. 20036 

(202) 467-4999; fax: (202) 293-2672 

PFAW advocates for freedom of expression, freedom of 
religion and a respect for cultural pluralism. The Artsave 
project monitors, publicizes and counters attacks on artis- 
tic expression through legal and technical assistance to 
artists and arts institutions. Distributes several publica- 
tions and position papers. 

Vote USA 

Contact Person: Helen Brunner 

c/o National Artists Advocacy Group (NAAG) 

918 F Street, N.W, Suite 610 

Washington, D.C. 20004 

(202) 393-2787; fax: (202) 347-7376 

Vote USA is a coalition of a wide range oj national non- 
profit organizations. The coalition was created to encour- 
age national & I"liiI nonprofit organizations to join the 
effort to register the mine than 65 million unregistered, 
eligible voters by making inter registration it part oj non- 
profits' routine, on-going activities. Vote USA member- 
ship includes national health & human services, arts, civil 
rights, media and technology & educational groups. 

— Compiled by ( !leo Cacoulidis 



March 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 7 




What if... 



□ Valuable film or tape was 
lost due to theft, fire or 
faulty processing? 

□ Your technical equipment 
broke down in the middle 



mmgv 

□ There's an injury or property 
damage on site? 

□ You're sued for film content, 
unauthorized use, or failure 
to obtain clearance? 

O What if you're not insured? 



MMa 



M: 



INSURANCE BROKERS 




ENTERTAINMENT/MEDIA INSURANCE SPECIALISTS 

Providing short and long-term coverage when you need it to reshoot, repair, and 

protect your products and time. 

CALL FOR A FREE QUOTE TODAY! 

1-800-638-8791 

7411 Old Branch Avenue, P.O. Box 128, Clinton, MD 20735 



8 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



Public TV Charts 
Survival Course 




Edited by Sue Young Wilson 



Public broadcasters are starting to cir- 

cle the wagons. Having narrowly dodged a 
bullet last year when Congress reversed itself 
and decided to keep funding the Corporation 
for Public Broadcasting after all, both 
America's Public Television Stations (APTS), 
public television's lobbying arm, and the 
Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) have 
launched formal planning efforts to reconfig- 
ure what are currently fragmented decision- 
making and governance procedures. 

"We want to find out how public broad- 
casting . . . will operate fifteen to twenty years 
from now," says Joseph Traigle, chair of the 
APTS committee that is in the process of hir- 
ing a consulting firm to conduct the study. 
"How will we make decisions and plan for 
that future? What is the process by which an 
extremely diverse group of radio and televi- 
sion stations come together as institutions, 
not only to reach decisions, but to implement 
those decisions, to bring them to closure?" 

The consulting firm, scheduled to be cho- 
sen in February (after press time), will be 
asked to propose a number of different 
options for new decision-making procedures. 

Adds Traigle, the former chairman of 
Louisiana Public Broadcasting, "When we 
analyze what happened to us last year, we all 
know that we could, should, and must be bet- 
ter organized if we're going to continue to 
survive." The APTS trustees decided to 
launch the study last year after some of the 
trustees and station members the organiza- 
tion had brought to Washington lobbied 
Congress tor the right to carry advertising — a 
Republican-friendly position contrary to 
APTS's official line — showing that public 
broadcasters cannot present a united front 
even on crucial lobbying issues. 

One of the future issues that PBS and 
APTS will have to (ace is the transition to 




digital technology, whose options range from 
digital delivery platforms that are still on the 
horizon (so-called "Advanced TV" and "video 
dialtone") to broadcast alternatives, such as 
CD-ROM and the World Wide Web, that have 
already arrived. 

MCI, for example, has committed a mini- 
mum of $15 million to PBS over the next five 
years for the development of CD-ROMs based 
on the network's programming and for the 
expansion of the new PBS Online Web site. But 
will others in the public broadcasting commu- 
nity, lacking the institutional clout of PBS, be 
able to afford the inevitable transition from 
analog to digital? And even if they do, will the 
new regulatory landscape (the overhaul of the 
Communications Act of 1934 with which 
Congress has been wrestling lor over two years) 
offer the same kind of protected status that 
noncommercial broadcasters have enjoyed in 
the past? Or will public broadcasters have to 
rely more heavily on "enhanced underwriting," 



those little "thank-you"s at programs' end that 
begin to look increasingly like advertising? 

In anticipation of this dizzying future, PBS 
chairman Gerald L. Baliles has also formed a 
study group of present and past board members 
to address "both governance reform and strate- 
gic business planning," as he wrote in a letter to 
public broadcasters last October, to tackle the 
thorny issues of PBS's relationship to its mem- 
ber stations and its financial problems. The net- 
work is getting input from accounting firm 
KPMG Peat Marwick. 

"As a collective," Baliles admitted in the let- 
ter, "we are plagued by years-old arguments 
that have never been resolved. We are wary, at 
best, about our own governance system. Even 
the principle of majority rule is not well-estab- 
lished within the membership; as a result, it 
would appear that some members assert the 
right of individual veto over even an over- 
whelming consensus of their colleagues. 
Clearly, we have not yet answered all of the 
questions that prevent us from aligning our 
resources and our talents toward a new future." 

He vowed to later expand the group "in 
steadily widening circles ... to station general 
managers, to lay leaders and, finally, to business 
leaders and policy experts who share our com- 
mitment to secure our future." 

It's still too early to tell what changes will 
result from either study; APTS's Traigle stress- 
es that any modification of the mechanics ol 
the organization's decision-making is in the 
early "planting" stage, far from harvest. 

Some independent producers already 
express concern, however, over the nature of 
the discussions. "Right now," observes James 
Yee, executive director of the Independent 
Television Service (ITVS), "the locus seems to 
he on infrastruc ture issues, rather than on uhi- 
tent or .mess issues. When content conies up 

at all, it's mentioned only tangentially." As the 



March 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 9 



"In making Picture Bride, 
we turned many times to 
AIVF/FIVF publications for 
the facts on fundraising, 
production and distribution. 
Their books are up-to-date, 
well organized and accessible. 
Best of all, it's getting the 411 
without the schmooze!" 
Kayo Hatta — 
"Picture Bride", winner of 
The Audience Award, 
Sundance Film Festival, 1995 

"The new AIVF/FIVF books 
are a great one-stop course in 
independent film distribution. 
Keep your film's release story 
from being one of hex, lies & 
videotape — or living in 
oblivion;" 

Whit Stillman — "Barcelona" 
& "Metropolitan" 



CULL NOW 
[212] 807-1400 

Or write: AIVF/FIVF 

304 HUDSON STREET, 6th Fl, 

NEWYORK.NY 10013 

Shipping and handling: 

Domestic - $3.50 for the 

first book, $ 1 .00 for each 

additional book. 

Foreign - $5.00 for the first 

book, $ 1 .50 for each 

additional book. 

VISA and Mastercard 

Accepted 



OF 3 GREAT RESOURCE 
BOOKS FROM AIVF/FIVF 

ORDER TODAY - SUPPLIES ARE LIMITED ! 



AIVF/FIVF GUIDE TO INTERNATIONAL FILM & VIDEO FESTIVALS 

edited by Kathryn Bowser 

$34.95/$29.95 AIVF members. Plus shipping and handling. 

The 4th edition of FIVF's best seller is a completely indexed and easy-to-read 

compendium of over 400 international film and video festivals, with contact 

information, entry regulations, dates and deadlines, categories, accepted formats, 

and much more. The festival guide includes information on all types of festivals: 

small and large, specialized and general, domestic and foreign. 



AIVF/FIVF GUIDE TO FILM & VIDEO DISTRIBUTORS 

edited by Kathryn Bowser 

$24.95/$ 1 9.95 AIVF members. Plus shipping and handling. 

A must-read for independent film and video makers searching for the right 

distributor.The distributors' guide presents handy profiles of 1 50 commercial and 

nonprofit distributors, practical information and company statistics on the type of 

work handled, primary markets, relations with producers, marketing and 

promotion, foreign distribution and contacts. Fully indexed. This is the best 

compendium of distribution information especially tailored for independent 

producers available. 

THE NEXT STEP: DISTRIBUTING INDEPENDENT FILMS AND VIDEOS 

edited by Morrie Warsbawski 

$24.95/$ 1 9.95 AIVF members. Plus shipping and handling. 
Leading professionals in the field answer frequently asked questions on 
distribution. Learn more about finding a distributor from Debra Zimmerman 
(Women Make Movies), self-distribution from Joe Berlinger (producer/director 
of Brother's Keeper), foreign distribution from Nancy Walzog (Tapestry 
International) and theatrical distribution from David Rosen (author of Off 
Hollywood). Plus find out about promotion; public broadcasting, cable and home 
video markets; non-theatrical distribution; contracts and much, much more. 
A bibliography provides additional readings on selected topics. This is a prime 
source of practical insights into the whole distribution process. 



SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL 

SAVE OVER 25%— ORDER ALL THREE BOOKS AND PAY ONLY $59.95 Plus shipping and handling. 
Join now as an AIVF member at the DISCOUNTED rate of $40.00 for I year! 

Both of these SPECIALS expire April 30, 1996 



10 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



source of some of the most innovative pro- 
gramming that appears on public television, 
St. Paul-based ITVS wants assurance that 
the ongoing APTS and PBS strategy efforts 
acknowledge the diversity of viewpoint and 
independence of spirit that are central to the 
mission of public broadcasting. 

However important issues of technology 
and revenue may be, in the final analysis, 
according to Yee, it is the ability of public 
broadcasting to offer an alternative — with- 
standing market pressures and rising above 
the mainstream — that makes the planning 
discussions worth having in the first place. 
"Both APTS and PBS must confront the 
issue of content, the nature of programming 
in public broadcasting, in their planning 
studies," Yee insists. "If they don't raise it, we 
will. It's simply that important." 

Gary O. Larson 

Gary O. Larson is a freelance writer based in 
Washington, D.C. 



Save That Video! 

The Library of Congress will conduct public 
hearings in three cities this spring in order to 
elicit both oral and written testimony on the 
importance of video and television preserva- 
tion. 




The Library 
of Congress 

bounded in 1800 



The hearings will be held in Los Angeles 
on March 6, in New York on March 20, and 
in Washington, D.C. on March 26, according 
to William Murphy, director of the fact-find- 
ing study. Librarian of Congress James H. 
Billington, apparently taking a keen interest 
in the subject, will serve as chair at all three 
hearings. 

Murphy, who is on loan to the library from 
the National Archives, is founding president 
of the Association of Moving Image 
Archivists (AMIA), a national organization 
of archivists concerned with film and video 
preservation. He helped prepare the 
National Archives' testimony for a 1993 film 
preservation Study and served on the preser- 



vation task force. 

Murphy hopes to get a wide variety of views 
from organizations and individuals interested in 
the preservation of "our television heritage," he 
says. He has targeted local and national broad- 
casters, including public broadcasting stations, 
and program producers ranging from 
Hollywood studios to low-budget indepen- 
dents, video artists, and community producers. 
Spokespersons for documentary, news, and 
public affairs programs will be as important as 
those on the entertainment side of television, 
Murphy asserts. Federal and state television 
archives, university-based archives, historical 
society archives, and stock footage libraries, 
will also participate, as well as museums and 
special collections. Murphy is also seeking indi- 
vidual researchers and scholars who use video 
materials to articulate reasons why video has 
educational, cultural, and research value. 

The latter is an important point because the 
Library of Congress' 1993 study of American 
film preservation readily assumed public accep- 
tance of the importance of ensuring a future for 
historic film. That case has yet to be made for 
television and video recordings. Murphy 
observes that, given the ephemeral nature of 
television programming, the viewing public has 
given little thought to the preservation of video 
programs, often assuming it's all being handled 
by the networks. He says there's a need for a 
nationwide program to 
educate the public and 
stimulate interest and 
support for video 
preservation; one of 
the hearings' first goals 
is to gather entertain- 
ing ideas on how to 
raise public awareness. 
(The American Film 
Institute's success in 
raising consciousness about the problems of 
nitrate film points up the kind of work that 
needs to be done to get television history taken 
seriously.) 

In-house, the study is known as "the 
American Television Project." Asked if the 
concerns of independent video artists, docu- 
mentarians, and community video practitioners 
stand a chance of being heard amid the thun- 
dering chorus of television industry representa- 
tives, Murphy says he is optimistic. He stresses 
the importance ol the role that independent 

filmmakers like Fred Wiseman and administra- 
tors like Betsy McL.me oi the International 
Documentary Association played in the 




Hi8 Drops Out! 
Beta Takes Notice. 

ESPI Backs New Format: 



Mini 



IV 



Affordable, high quality digital 
tape arrives and "it's a winner!" 
ESPI responds quickly , offering 
Sony's 3-chip VX-1000, a truly 
amazing consumer camcorder 
with professional capabilities. 
Solstein issues statement, "We 
are bumping up Mini DV and 
DVCPRO to BetaSP in full 
component and to Digital Beta 
in 4:2:2. The paradigm shift is 
happening now - don't blink, 
stay tuned." 

We accept all major credit cards 
and can provide insurance. 




PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

1 5 West 26th Street 

NYC, NY 10010 

212 481-ESPI (3774] 



March 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 11 



/ei/UAVID 



(212)228-7748 



] 



296 Elizabeth Street, Suite bf 

New York, N.Y. 

10012 

AVID & D/Vision suites 

at reasonable prices 

/?i/l.«AVID is an HM Rifken Productions,lnc. Co. CALL ABOUT Beta SP Camera packages (IKE-57!) and crews 



toujour! Monsieur Thomas Edison at your service. 

Death has not slowed me down. I've recently discovered 

that Hots Shots Cool Cuts has the most fantastique 

International location footage. From Tokyo to Timbuktu 

over 100 hrs. of landmarks, aerials, cityscapes, & culture. 

Around zee world, they've got it all. I heartily recommend 

Hot Shots Cool Cuts for all your international footage needs. 

Vive la stock cinematique internationale!!! 






: ':':.' . ' : ■■ ■'■■ ' 



■'" "' 5 v::gK^ : - :;■:::?: 




INTERNATIONAL 

CONTEMPORARY 

ARCHIVAL 

HOT SHOTS 

!: (212) 799-9100 
X: (212) 799-9258 

The stock footage company whose stock footage doesn't look like stock footage 



library's 1993 film study, to which their testi- 
mony added needed balance. Murphy is look- 
ing for active participation from the indepen- 
dent video community; in January, he met 
with videomakers at Media Alliance in New 
York City. 

While each hearing will cover roughly the 
same ground, the various locations will likely 
give rise to different discussions. In Los 
Angeles Murphy hopes to pull in Bay Area 
video artists as well as entertainment industry 
representatives. In New York he expects inde- 
pendent video spokespeople and representa- 
tives from cable companies; in Washington 
representatives from government, the 
Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and pub- 
lic affairs programs. 

The Washington, D.C., hearing will be held 
at the Library of Congress; the other hearing 
sites are yet to be selected. All three will be 
open to the public. Those wishing to give oral 
or written testimony must make advance 
arrangements. The deadlines to testify in Los 
Angeles and New York have passed; Wash- 
ington's is March 6. The deadline for written 
testimony has passed for Los Angeles; it is 
March 6 for New York and March 12 for 
Washington. Contact: William Murphy at 
(202) 707-5708 or Steve Leggett at (202) 757- 
5912 or write to Murphy at the Motion 
Picture, Broadcasting and Radio Division, 
Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. 20540. 
All testimony will be published in a compre- 
hensive document tentatively titled The State 
of American Television and Video Preservation. 

Deirdre Boyle 

Deirdre Boyle is a critic, curator, and teacher of inde- 
pendent film and video and the author of Guerilla 
Television Revisited (Oxford, 1 996) . 

Hoop Dreams Director Funds 
Home Team Filmmakers 

Steve James, director and co-producer of the 
Oscar-nominated documentary Hoop Dreams, 
has donated $5,000 to his alma mater, South- 
ern Illinois University at Carbondale, to set up 
a minority filmmakers award fund. Citing the 
low number of minority voices in the film 
industry, James announced in November 1995 
that he would head the drive to raise addi- 
tional money for the fund, which is designed 
to help minority students with aspirations in 
film. 

James said he thought immediately of his 
alma mater when MTV awarded him $5,000 
to give to a university of his choice as part of 



12 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



its Best New Filmmaker of the Year award. 
Hoop Dreams chronicles the difficult lives of 
two Black Chicago teenagers and their quest 
for pro basketball fame. 

"When I was at [SIUC], there were hard- 
ly any Black students in the cinema and pho- 
tography department, because, I think, it was 
typically harder for the average Black stu- 
dent from Chicago to find the money to 
make a film in addition to the hurdle of 
tuition, room and board, and the other 
expenses in college," says the filmmaker, who 
received an M.F.A. from the school in 1984- 
"In general, I think, in film schools there's 
not the kind of ethnic representation that 



Hoop dream 

shot: Director 

Steve James will 

use a prize to 

help minority 

filmmakers at his 

alma mater. 



Courtesy film- 
makers 




there could be." 

Gary Kolb, head of SIUC's cinema and pho- 
tography department, says that the situation 
has not changed much since James attended 
the school, but he hopes that some of the lack 
will be offset by the scholarships, which are 
open to applicants from SIUC's racial and eth- 
nic minority populations — chiefly Asian- 
Americans, Blacks, and Hispanics, according to 
Kolb. 

Kolb says he hopes to bring in at least an 
additional $100,000 by targeting potential 
donors among celebrities, sports stars, business 
owners, and private foundations. With that 
amount, the department could establish an 
endowment that would award $2,000 produc- 
tion grants to two students annually. 

Both James and Kolb want the fund to 

expand into a comprehensive program for 

minorities interested in film, movies, and other 

visual media. Eventually, the university would 

like to grant scholarships to filmmakers of color, 

hold an annual symposium, host workshops by 

visiting filmmakers, and endow a faculty chair. 

SONIA SABNIS 

Sonia Sabnis is a former editorial intern at The 
Independent. 



One Less Pain in the IRS 

Uncle Sam and his elves at the Internal 
Revenue Service put on their gift-giving caps 
for many mediamakers in 1995, restoring a free- 
lance health insurance deduction and loosen- 
ing receipt requirements for travel and enter- 
tainment expenses. 

In April of last year, Congress restored the 25 
percent health insurance deduction for self- 
employed people for the 1994 tax year. This 
means that if you paid for your own health 
insurance in 1994, were self-employed, and did 
not take the deduction, you can now file a 1994 
amended return (form 1040X for federal 
returns; check with your state income tax office 
for the proper state form) and subtract 25 per- 
cent of your total health insurance premiums 
from your total income. 

Do note that you can'l, however, deduct 
your health insurance for any month that you 
or your spouse were covered under an employ- 
er's health plan, nor can the deduction be more 
than your net earnings as shown on your 
Schedule C. 

It you did try to deduct health insurance pre- 
miums from your 1994 taxes and have received 
a notice from the IRS saying that the deduction 



National i 
Educational /| 

EDlA 



Network 



formerly National 
Educational Film 
& Video Festival 

May 15-19, 
1996 

Oakland, CA 

MARKET 

- Distributors are 
looking for docu- 
mentaries, health 
films, special 
interest videos, 
social issues titles 

- what you have 
to offer! 

CONFERENCE 

- 4 day intensive 
covering industry 
trends, fundrais- 
ing, distribution 

& marketing 
strategies. 

With ample 
opportunity to 
meet, mix and 
mingle with your 
peers, heroes 
and potential 
distributors. 



For more information, contact: 

NEMN 655 13th Street, 
Oakland.CA 94612-1220 
PH 510.465.6885 
FX 510.465 2835 
E-mail nemn@aol.com 



March 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 13 



SHOOTING IN 

THE SOUTH? 

Check out why Allied handled 
28 features in 1994! 

-k Quality processing (16, Super 16 
& 35mm) 

* Overnight processing/A.M. dailies 

• Video dailies with KEYKODE™, 



TLC Edit Controller 



l£ 



* Interlock - Nagra T, 16 
& 35 mag stripe 

* Off-line, multi-format on-line 
& D-2 editing 

* Complete sound post facility for 
film & video - SSL Screen Sound, 
Foley, mixing, editing 

* Package pricing available 

• ALL CINDER 
ONE ROOF 




Digital Technologies Corp 



6305 N. O'Connor Road, Suite 1 1 1 

Irving, TX 75039-3510 

Tel: (214) 869-0100 

Fax: (214) 869-2117 or (214) 432-1710 



PASS 

Digital Audio 

for 

Video/Film 



16 -track Lock to 
Betacam SP & 3/4" 



COMPOSER REFERRAL 



ADR, Foley, SFX, Mixing, ADAT, 

Time Code DAT, MIDI, Soundtools, 

DINR-- Digidesign Intelligent Noise 

Reduction, Protools 3.1 

LOW RATES/GREAT ENGINEERS 



Studio PASS 


a program of 


HARVESTWORKS 


596 


Broad 


way, #602 


NYC 


10012 


212-431-1130 



Call for class brochure! 




Greenwi 
Village 

Master of Arts in 



Each year The New School Master of Arts in 
Media Studies program provides students with 
maps of the global village. Over its 20 year his- 
tory, the Media Studies program has empha- 
sized both theory and practice in film, video, 
audio and digital media. The program's approach 
to media studies is multidimensional, address- 
ing aesthetic and pragmatic concerns. Our M.A. 
program develops a critical understanding of 
the mediated culture in which we live and the 
skills to produce media messages in a variety 
of forms and genres. Our flexible curriculum 
and schedule includes on-line courses that can 
e taken from your home or office. We are cur- 
rently accepting applications for Fall 1996. 

Media Studies 

Call 212 229 5630 ext. 55 for a Media Studies 
catalog and application. 



^The New School 

66 West 12th Street New York, NY iooii 

229 5630 Ext 



5 5 




was wrong, here's how to proceed: Write the 
phrase "SE health insurance" on the top of the 
notice, and send it back. That should set the 
matter to rest. If you've already responded to 
such a notice by paying additional tax or 
accepting a smaller refund, you'll have to file 
the amending forms to get the money back. 

Even better news 
for tax year 1995: 
Thirty percent of 
your health insur- 
ance premium is 
deductible. 

Also, AS OF October 

1, 1995, the IRS raised to $75 the amount it 
will allow one to deduct as travel and enter- 
tainment expenses (except for lodging) with- 
out a receipt. Previously you needed a receipt 
for any such expense over $25. (The $75 fig- 
ure does not apply to gifts, which still is limit- 
ed to $25 per person per year.) 

Because of the new rule's timing, you will 
have to meet the old requirement for expens- 
es incurred before October 1; the new $75 rule 
applies for October 1 -December 31 expenses. 

The IRS still requires documentation about 
the purpose of an entertainment expense, the 
cost, and where, when, and with whom it took 
place. For travel expenses, documentation will 
still be required about the purpose of the trip 
and the nature of the expense. 

The new rules create an attractive alterna- 
tive to the U.S. food per diems, which run 
from $26-$38 per day, depending on the city 
to which you travel. If you are totally record- 
averse, however, you may still want to take the 
per diems because they require the least 
record keeping — although you still must have 
a record of the trip's purpose and a diary show- 
ing who you met and/or what you did. You 
cannot, at this time, take per diems some days 
and expenses other days for the same trip. 

Susan Lee 

Susan Lee, a New York tax consultant, has specialized 
in filmmaking-related taxation for more than 15 years. 

Errata 

In the article "Shorts Stories from Sundance," 
published in the January/February 1996 issue, 
the distributor for Terracino's short film M31 
Polish Waiter was incorrectly identified. First 
Run Features is the distributor and will be 
releasing the film on video in July. The 
Independent regrets the error. 



14 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 




Betacam SP production packages 

Avid MCBOOO Si MCIOOD on/off-line editing 

component Betacam SP on-line editing 

Microtime Paint F/X DL graphics 

Macintosh graphics & compositing 

component HiB transfers 

Betacam SP, 3/4" SP, HiB S. VHS duplication 

25' x 3D' stage 

212.529.8204 

DV8VIDE0/738 BRDflD Wfl V N V C 10003 



AmiRlCAN 

(TlOKTAGE 

iKC 



AVID 



.V 



900 



AVID 900 NOW AVAILABLE 

FILM & VIDEO PRODUCTION 

POST-PRODUCTION SPECIALISTS 

Hi8 TO BETACAM TIMECODED DUBS 

BETACAM SP PACKAGES from $300 



lOTH YEAR ANNIVERSARY 



voice 334-8283 334-8345 fax 
375 West B'way 3R, NY. NY 10012 



"Scriptware is the best!'! 

M Sen 




The pro's choice! 

Professional script writers demand two things: 
They need to get their ideas onto the page 
easily and quickly— anything between your 
brainstorm and the paper kills your creativity. 
And they need their scripts in the proper for- 
mat-: f it doesn't look right, your script ends up 
in some secretary's trash can instead of in your 
producer's eager hands! 

With Scriptware. your story flies onto the 
page. And the formatting that Hollywood 
expects happens instantly and automatically! 
All you need are your pinkies and the Tab and 
Enter keys to create a perfectly formatted script. 
It's easier than a typewriter! Type character 
names and scene headings with just one key- 
stroke. Scriptware does all the margin changes, 
spacing changes, capitalizing and page breaking 
for you! Make changes on page one and 
Scriptware makes sure the rest of your script is 
still just right. You just write-Scriptware keeps 
your script read) to print, submit and sell! 



Get exactly what you need! 

Scriptware Lite or Scriptware Pro. Both arc 
full-featured word processors that get your 
story on the page and your name on the screen. 
Lite comes in two different versions-Film for 
movies and filmed TV shows (e.g. 1-hour dra- 
mas), and Sitcom for taped TV shows. Lite 
includes a 100,000+ word dictionary and it lets 
you import scripts you've already written. Pro 
lets you write in every format there is and lets 
you modify and create new formats, too. It also 
has a 120.000+ word thesaurus, revision han- 
dling, Notes and Outline features, instant Title 
Page creation, and other powerful writer's tools. 
nan 




Sctiptwore'i fijQ Id \"u n/v noma with pal >mc lutysaokti ■\n,l »uh 
St ripr^tuf. hIuii you set u whal you frt! SeripiWBn thowi you ru/ir/i 
h lui \"nr h npt mil limt. ttla- w Iwn you pnnt b-pagt bfraks. htodtn, 
ftHHcri.rnistin marks. AJOI piiiiesarut nunt' ViiH-dtrwnnifmis anicoih 
it \t w /mi/iw help make using .s» tipf/nm's poweijulftalunu a bn fsi ' 



d Field. 
nplay 

Rave Reviews! 

Scriptware is the software of choice at studios 
and production companies. Just listen to 
what the pros say about Scriptware: 

Scriptware is in a class by itself. The 
easiest to master. Others hardly compare." 

Tracy Clark 
The New York Screenwriter 4195 

Simply the best there is. Just add words'.' 

I,arry Hertzog 

Nowhere Man.SeaQucst 

C( Nothing approaches it in ease of use." 

Peter Covote 
\VriterlActor 

The best tool for scriptwriting, period!' 

Hy Bender 

Essential Software for Writers 




The price is right! 

Order today and get Scriptware for a special 
price! Or try our demo for FRKE (nomiall) 
$9.95). Experience Scriptware and the freedom to 
create for as little as $129.95 with a 30-day 
money-back guarantee!. To order, or for more 
info. CALL TOLL-FREE 800-788-7090! 

Vript»art nrquim: t<»'. IHMfwnp*lih*r cnmputrr I •"'.•* .« htfhtrl *'^"K k \M ■ 
Juts .ct>«« : I .th.fhrt • I HUfliVP* ***<" *»> ' ^'J *•* * v, " w, *' 'V"-*"! 
■ nun. Ik 1750 ^«nS; 5 




SITE SEEING 

.A. TTc>ur of ^sX/Hat's on the 

Web for Indie Media Makers 



by Andrew Giannelli 
& Sue Young Wilson 

By now, you've heard of the World Wide 
Web. You may have surfed it with all the eager 
curiousity of a wired-in 
fifteen-year-old. But 
whether you're a still- 
uncertain "newbie" or a 
cyber cowboy, you 
should know that the 
Web is loaded with a 
dazzling number of re- 
sources for indie film- 
and videomakers. 

Here's a list of our 
picks of some of the most useful, exciting, and 
fun sites. The Web being the, well, web it is, 
these are just places to start. (And don't miss 
AIVF's new Web site, at http://www.virtual- 
film.com/AIVF/.) 



Databases and 
Pages of Other Links 

The Internet Movie Database 

http://www.msstate.edu/Movies/ 

Billed as "the most comprehensive free source 
of movie information on the Internet," this is 
what it sounds like — a huge database of infor- 
mation on films, including many independents. 
Its creators boast on the home page, "If it's 
movie related, it might be quicker to ask, 
What's not here/ There are tens of thousands 
of movies covered, from the earliest of silent 
movies to films still in production; biographies 
and filmographies on hundreds of thousands of 
actors, actresses, directors, and more; enough 
information to melt even the brain of a black 
belt in movie trivia; ratings and reviews.... 
[And] even some pictures and sounds thrown 
in for good measure." 




CineMedia 

http://www.afionline.org/CINEMEDIA/Cine 
Media.home.html 

"The Internet's largest film and media directo- 
ry" includes separate pages on cinema, televi- 
sion, and new 
media. The cinema 
page offers you a 
further choice of 
links organized by 
topic: films, stu- 
dios, actors, festi- 
vals, theaters, 
schools, produc- 
tion, organizations, 
history/research, 
and other indices of film-related sites (includ- 
ing many of the other sites listed here). Now 
you now why they call it "Web surfing" — hang 
ten, or you'll drown in the info ocean. 

Guide to Film and Video Resources 
on the Net 

http://http2.sils.umich.edu/Public/fvl/film.html 

An impressively researched directory of film- 
related resources on the Internet, assembled by 
Lisa R. Wood and Kristen Garlock at the 
University of Michigan's School of Information 
and Library Studies. They list sites on film, 
video, audio-visual resources, general media, 
and laserdisc for an audience "with academic, 
popular, and production interests in film," giv- 
ing such useful information as a description of 
the site, access method, contact name, origi- 
nating body/author, intended audience, and 
comments. 

Clamen's Movie Information Collection 

http://www-cgi.cs.cmu.edu/afs/cs.cmu. 
edu/user/clamen/misc/movies/README.html 

A good list of industry-related links, arranged 
by Stewart Clamen. It includes the titles of all 
the movies in the National Film Registry. 



ClNEMASPACE 

http://cinemaspace.berkeley.edu/ 

This site is the home page for the 
UC/Berkeley Film Studies Program and is 
"devoted to all aspects of cinema and new 
media." It includes academic papers on film 
and new media, film theory and critique, 
multimedia "lectures," film clips, and links to 
other movie-related sites. 

American Communication Associa- 
tion's Film Studies Page 

http://www.uark.edu/depts/comrninfo/www/ 
film.html 

Yet another large list of movie-related sites, 
from that of the Alliance for Faith and Family 
for Movie Censorship to Women in TV and 
Film. 

The Independent Film and Video 
Makers Internet Resource Guide 

http://mosaic.echonyc.com/%7Emvidal/Indi- 
Film+ Video.html 



In@M@cba 



Compiled by Mike Vidal, this site is an 
invaluable guide to resources on the Internet 
for the independent film and video commu- 
nity. It includes news and announcements on 
communications advocacy issues and links to 
advocacy organizations and government 
media regulators. 

Film & Video Festivals 

Putting information about your film or video 
festival on the World Wide Web is now "the 
thing to do." The larger, more established 
and celebrity-ridden festivals use the Web to 
convey the rush of being on the scene. Less 



16 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



YOUR LIBRARY 

HAVE THE 
INDEPENDENT? 

Take this coupon to 

your school or public 

librarian and request a 

subscription today! 



10 issues/yr. 

Library subscription rate $75 

($90 foreign) 

Published by the Foundation for 

Independent Video and Film 

ISSN 0731-0589 

Order from FIVF, 

304 Hudson St., 6th fl., NY, NY 10013; 

(212) 807-1400 

EBSCO: (205) 991-6600; 

fax (205) 991-1479. 

FAXON (US): (800) 283-2966; 

CAN (519) 472-1005; 

CAN fax (519) 472-1072 



-IBM 

■r 



^■i 



& 



■ 






HP 



fc'MT 



ORDER THESE BOOKS FROM FIVF 

NEW EDITIONS - ORDER NOW.' 

The AIVF/FIVF Guide to International Film & Video Festivals 

Kathryn Bowser, ed. $29.95 AIVF members; $34.95 others 

$=_ 

The AIVF/FIVF Guide to Film & Video Distributors 

Kathryn Bowser, ed. $19.95 AIVF members; $24.95 others 



The Next Step: A Film and Video Distribution Handbook 

Morrie Warshawski, ed. $19.95 AIVF members; $24-95 others 

$_ 

Order all three new editions and save over 25%! Offer 
expires April 30, 1996. $59.95 $ 

Alternative Visions: Distributing Independent Video in a 
Home Video World by Debra Franco; $9.95 AIVF members; 
$12.95 others $ 



Film and Video Financing by Michael Wiese; $22.95 $_ 



Film Directing Shot hy Shot: Visualizing from Concept to 
Screen by Steven D. Katz; $24-95 $ 

Home Video: Producing for the Home Market by Michael 

Wiese: $11.95$ 

The Independent Film & Videomakers Guide by Michael 
Wiese; $13.95 $ 

The RO.V Online Experiment by Don Adams & Arlene 
Goldbard; $5.00 incl. postage & handling $ 

Shaking the Money Tree: How to Get Grants and Donations 
for Film and Video by Morrie Warshawski; $24.95 $_ 

Postage/handling: US - $3.50 1st book, $1.00 ea. addl; 
Foreign - $5.00 1st book, $1.50 ea. addl $ 



TOTAL $ 

Make checks payable to FIVF, 304 Hudson St., 6th fl., 
NY, NY 10013; or charge by phone: (212) 807-1400 
or fax: (212) 463-8519. 



schmoozy festivals use their Web pages to 
provide festival-goers with a digital catalogue 
of events. And other, virtual festivals that 
have no physical home are cropping up and 
taking place on the Web itself. 

An Index of Film Festivals 

http://www.laig.com/law/entlaw/filmfes.htm 

Entertainment lawyer Mark Litwak main- 
tains a comprehensive list of film and video 
festivals with a Web presence. Among his 
various links are four different sites about 



i uj a m 



Guide to film and Video 
Resources on the Internet 



The New York QuickTime Festival 

http://www.users.interport.net/~adavi/NYQTF 
ST3.HTML 

This site showcases the works of those explor- 
ing and experimenting with creating moving 
images for viewing on computers only. Details 
for submitting work are posted at the Web site 
along with the highlights of last year's festival, 
held at Pratt Manhattan in New York. 



UFVA Student Film & Video Festival 

http://astro.temple.edu/~dkluft 

In addition to information about the 
University Film Video Association 
(UFVA) festival, this site includes over 
200 links to online film and video festi- 
vals and 500 links to film, video, and 
communication schools, programs, and 
departments. 



Cannes (only one of them official). 

The Usual Suspects: 

Cannes: http://www.mhm.fr/festival/cannes/ 
index.html 

Berlin: http://fub46.zedat.fu-berlin.de:8080/ 

~frs/bff-index.html 

(An unofficial page maintained by a fan.) 

London: http://www.ipmpcug.co.uk/lff.html 

Sundance: http://www.sundance.org/sun- 
dance/institute/ceg2.html 

Toronto: http://www.bell.cal/toronto/film- 
fest/ 

Unusual Suspects: 

The Low Res Film and Video Festival 

http://www.lowres.com/lovvres/ 

The Low Res festival took place January 6 in 
New York and will be in San Francisco in 
October. Find the call tor entries at the site. 

MPEG Bizarre Film Festival (I'M 
BIFF) 

Imp: '/www.perry.com/imblfF/film.html 

Most works created (oil hours, one would 
hope) by grail students at academic comput- 
ing labs. Cur favorite: a computer-generated 
trip into a subunit ot a fruit fly's ovary. TotO, 
I don't think we're in C 'amies anymore. 



The Virtual Film Festival 

http:www.virtualfilm.com 

Launched at the Toronto International Film 
Festival in September, 1995, the Virtual Film 
Festival exists only in cyberspace. But how can 
you have a virtual power lunch. 7 The festival 
has addressed this concern by providing exclu- 
sive chat areas for qualifying members only. 
The site is being refined at press time and is 
scheduled to have a presence at IFFCON, 
Sundance, and Berlin and to appear at the Hot 
Docs Festival (March 21-24), whereafter it will 
be fully up and open to the public. And it's 
home to AIVF's and The Independent's very 
own recently launched Web pages. 

More Cool Stuff 

Cyber Film School 

http://www.io.org/~cincan/cfs/cfs.htm 

Learn online-movie making — and moviemak- 
ing online. There are lots of hot links and great 
articles on filmmaking to be found at this site, 
which was selected fourth aiming Computerlife 
magazine's "101 Great Hangouts Online." 

The Flicker Pages 

http://www.sirius.com/~sstark/ 

San Franciscan Scott Stark's pages do a good 
job of providing resources to both artists and 
atficionados of experimental cinema. 



Thm Nam* and Futurm of Cammra Stablll 

GLIDECRM DUHL G 




The Evolution of Camera Stabilization has just taken 
"One Giant Leap" forward The Glldecam Dual-G is the 
first Dual-Gimbaled. Dual-Handled, Counterbalanced 
Camera Stabilization System designed to distribute the 
weight of the system between two operators The Dual-G 
stabilizes cameras weighing from 8 to 22 pounds, and 
frees the camera in ways only previously accomplished 
with systems costing ten times as much 



We also offer the Glidecam 1000 Pro hand-held 
stabilizer for cameras up to 6 pounds, and the Glidecam 
3000 Pro stabilizer for cameras from 4 to 10 pounds, 
and the Camcrane 100 boom-arm camera crane 
for cameras weighing up to 20 pounds 



Available at Major Dealers or call Glidecam Industries 

1-800-949-2089 or 1-508-866-2199 



Glidecam is registered at the PATENT and TM office 




BUDGET 

VIDEO 

BIBLE 

BY CUFF ROTH 



I 30-day 
money 
back 
guarantee 

Call with 
credit-card, 

or send 
check/m.o. 

Desktop 

Video 

Systems 

Box 668 

NYC 10272 

Just $27.95 
plus $3 

shipping 
NY residents 

add $2.31 

Hi8andS-VHS 

SECRETS REVEALED! 

The essential do-it-yourself guide to creating 
top-notch video on a shoestring budget 

Editing, shooting strategies, 

time code systems, audio 

tracks, computer-based 

desktop video, & much 

more! 400 pages. 

ORDER NOW (24-hr) 
1 -800-247-6553 



March 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 17 



fost& 
Luscious 



500, 750 and 1000 watts 
without the weight or 
hassle. Lowel Rifa-lites. 
The skinny travel 
companions that turn 
into bright, sensually soft 
sources in seconds. 





lueF 



Lowel-Light Manufacturing, Inc. 

1 40 58th Street Brooklyn, New York 1 1 220 
718 921-0600 Fax: 718 921-0303 






FESTIVM INTERNATIONAL DU fllM ^CANNES 



Site officiet 



■ -'- ■ V. 



Early Motion Pictures from the 
Library of Congress, 1897-1916 

http:/Acweb2. loc.gov/papr/mpixhome. html 

The "first chapter in the history of the medi- 
um." Downloadable film clips with running 
times of two to three minutes. 

Screenedge 

http://www.state5 1 xo.uk/screenedge/ 
Screenedge is an example of the myriad inde- 
pendent film and video distribution companies 
that are attempting to reach audiences directly 
through the Web. Of course, use of the Internet 
to distribute video works themselves rather 
than quarter-screen 30-second clips and other 
shadows of the original, while inevitable, is not 
yet a reality. 



Screenwriters Online 

ht tp : //screenwriter, com/insider/news .html 

Though you may have to wait a while for 
"GafferNet," the Internet and the Web have 
become resources for a) professionals involved 
in film and video production, b) those who wish 
to be professionally involved, and c) those who 
wish to pretend to be professionally involved. 
This site, maintained by Cinemedia, lets one 
interact with well known professional screen- 
writers and learn secrets of the trade. 

Charles Deemer's Screenwriters and 
Playwrights Home Page 

http://www.teleport.com/~cdeemer/scrwriter. 
html 

The screenwriters' resources include "nuts & 
bolts info, from dramatic structure to format to 
marketing; Jack Stanley's Screenwriters FAQ; 
film databases; movie reviews; eclectic stuff 
from Godzilla to Hitchcock; tips from the pros 
on the craft and business of screenwriting; and 
more." A fascinating site. 



Finding Web Sites 
for Yourself 

Looking for the home page of a particular stu- 
dio, film school, or current movie? The Web 
sites listed below are there to help you find 
other Web sites by doing searches on words 
and names. As you'd expect, these "search" 
sites are among the most frequently visited on 
the Web. 

YAHOO: http://www.yahoo.com 
INFOSEEK: http://www.infoseek.com 
WEBCRAWLER: http://www.webcrawler.com 

Andrew Giannelli is a New York-based writer and Web 
developer. Sue Young Wilson is managing editor of The 
Independent. 



Can't Get to the Web Yet? 
Here's What You Need.... 

Besides a computer with a fast modem, you'll 
need an Internet service provider who offers 
Web access and some special software. 

The big online services such as America 
Online and Prodigy now generally offer Web 
access to their members; but to really surf the 
Web you'll probably want 'to get an Internet ser- 
vice provider who offers a kind of connection — 
called SLIP or PPP— that allows for much faster 
loading of Web pages. New service providers 
are cropping up like dandelions — check your 
local Yellow Pages. Prices for SLIP/PPP service 
are currently running around $15-$25/mo. 

Finally, you'll need a kind of software called 
a "browser" to view the Web's graphics and 
navigate around it. Netscape Navigator is fast 
becoming the stan- 
dard browser. (Your 
Internet service 
provider will probably 
include the browser 
software with your 




account.) 
Surf's up! 



18 THE INDEPENDENT March 1996 



GENDERBTOER 

SAJSIDY STONE 



Relaxing in RL 

esy Sandy Stone 




by Nancy Bless 

Allucquere Rosanne (Sandy) Stone's 
peripatetic life journey, from her origins as a 
nice Jewish hoy from Weehawken, New 
Jersey, to her current status as the Goddess of 
Cyherspace, is reflected in her work history. 
Stone has heen a recording engineer, a com- 
puter programmer, a phone sex worker in a 
leshian separatist collective that services het- 
erosexuals, a researcher for hoth the National 
Institute of Health and Bell Lahs, a lecturer 
in the communication and sociology depart- 
ments ot die University oi California at San 
Diego, and a science fiction novelist. She has 
a Ph.D. from the history of consciousness 
program at University of California at Santa 
Cruz and is currently an assistant professor at 
the University ot Tex, is at .Austin, where she 
directs the Interactive Multimedia Labor- 
atory and teaches multimedia production 
and the theory and practice i-^i interactivity. 
Stone's work in sociology, neurology, popular 
culture, gender, and cyberspace make her a 
unique theorist and reporter on being human 
in the Information Age. 



That's a fluid state, as 
Stone well knows, both 
from her personal experi- 
ence as a transsexual and 
from close observation of 
the gender masquerades 
that go on so widely on the 
Internet. Stone was one of 
the first to study this 
aspect of cyber-interaction 
and bring a gender- con- 
scious perspective that 
deviates from the bells- 
and-whistles boosterism 
that characterizes popular 
discussion of this largely 
male turf. 

J While Stone has dissem- 
inated her theories in 
scholarly publications like 
Zone and Camera Obscura 
and in her recently pub- 
lished book, The War of Desire arid Technology at 
the Close of the Mechanical Age (MIT Press: 
Cambridge, Massachusetts; London, 1995), she 
also is highly visible outside the ivory tower. 
She lectures widely, as many academics do, but 
Stone also spreads her ideas in a less conven- 
tional way — through performance art. In the 
last few months alone Stone has been invited to 
speak and perform what she calls her "stand up 
theory" at universities, museums, and symposia 
in Sweden, Norway, Finland, Germany, Austria, 
Australia, Canada, and New York City. This 
past year, she was so in demand that she would 
teach in Austin on Tuesday through Thursday, 
hop a plane Thursday night, do the gig, and fly 
back tor Tuesday's class. "It was great," she says. 
"I stopped jet lagging. My body just couldn't 
remember where it was; I lived on whatever the 
local clock time was. It was wonderful, like 
being tree in the world." 

freeing the body is a recurrent theme in 
Stone's writing and in her performance piece, 
The Viimpirc's Kiss. In the piece, Stone performs 
a monologue in her everyday attire (black jer- 
sey, black pants, black boots), accumulating 
bits ot narrative that illuminate her themes of 



the body and technology. With considerable 
storytelling flair, she relates tales of phone sex, 
on-line gender switching, experiments in 
retraining physiological responses, the death of 
her father, and vampires. 

"There was an experiment done in the fifties 
or sixties in which the subject wore inverting 
prisms that turned the world upside down," says 
Stone. "Within a fairly short period of time, he 
began seeing things rightside up; his brain had 
corrected his vision. After he removed the 
prisms, his brain had to readjust. This is won- 
derful, because it demonstrates how plastic we 
are, how plastic the neurological system is." 

Stone takes this plasticity several steps fur- 
ther. "I propose a three-body model: the neuro- 
logical body, the topological body, and, between 
the two, the translator body that acts like a 
switchboard." Stone tells of paralysed people 
who are retrained to feel erotic pleasure in 
another site on their bodies where they have 
feeling. 

"What does it mean in our culture when you 
remap one of the forbidden zones into an area 
that is not forbidden?" she asks. It's more than 
a rhetorical question. In performance, she talks 
of having used this training to relocate her cli- 
toris to her palm, then proceeds to demonstrate 
the possibilities of this talent by masturbating to 
orgasm by rubbing her palm. "The sensation is 
real, but I don't really have time on stage to 
come to climax. ..so I fake it. In Toronto, people 
threw cigarettes at the stage when I was done." 

In conversation as in her work, Stone keeps 
coming back to the idea of "liquid identity," 
and her life certainly reflects it — in her com- 
mitment to exploring the places between 
worlds and the multiple facets ot her own char- 
acter, not to mention her own body. Technology 
has vastly expanded the potential tor liquid 
identity. The cyborg vampire, Stone explains, 
sees mortals napped not in time, but rather in 
a fixed subjective position. The cyborg vampire 
travels between the virtual and real worlds, 
between male and female. As Stone asserts, 
" Iransgender is the mode ot existence on the 
networks." 

Putting it another way, she says, "I here's a 
.Wu Yorker cartoon oi two dogs talking to eac h 

other and one of them s.iys, 'On the Internet, 
no one knows you're a dog.' " 

You can visit Sandy Stone at her World Wide 

Web site it lit t p: www.actlab.utexas.edu/~ 

sandy. 

Nancy lUcss is ilic gallery direcicn ,/i Women 8 Their 
Work in Austin I 



March 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 19 







Florida Flicks 

TliLe Fort Lauderdale 
International Film Festival 



BY MlCHALENE 

Seiler Milne 

When Gregory von Hausch took over as 
executive director of the Fort Lauderdale 
International Film Festival in 1989, he made it 
his mission to help small independent produc- 
tions find an appreciative audience in South 
Florida. Easier said than done. Laughing at the 
length of time it's taken to whet local appetites 
for arthouse fare, he explained, "If I had shown 
this year's lineup of independent films in 1989, 
no one would have understood what I was try- 
ing to do. I really have something in common 
with most filmmakers — we're all out there try- 
ing as hard as we can." 

Von Hausch insists he has no template 
when selecting the festival's line-up, other 
than to pay special attention to first-time direc- 
tors. He simply chooses what he likes and what 
he can get, which are not necessarily congru- 
ent in the competitive arena of festival plan- 
ning. Regarding the hierarchy created by festi- 
vals that require premieres, he says, "I don't 
think it's conducive to the reason why we're all 
here supporting independent film: to get as 
many audiences for it as possible." 

With 272 screenings over 19 days (Nov. 1 to 
19), Fort Lauderdale is the longest competitive 
festival in the free world. More than 100 films 
were shown, including seven feature documen- 
taries and 26 shorts packaged into 7 feature- 
length programs. American independents 
heavily dominated the 1995 slate, although 
there is never a predetermined geographical 
mix. In 1994, 10 Asian films were featured, 
while a previous year relied heavily on 
Scandinavian product. 

When first hired, von Hausch admits, "I 
wanted to grow so quickly, really wanting to 
make the festival bigger, that I naively thought 
I could create a market here. At the time, 
MIFED was earlier, and people could stop on 
their way back from Europe." In 1991 an offi- 
cial market with 60 booths representing 30 



r Gregory von Hausch (c.) and filmmakers on a 
seagoing excursion. Photo: Michalene Seiler Milne 




countries was installed, but it was a painful 
financial failure, and the festival has only 
recently repaid the losses incurred. Von 
Hausch learned that the types of films submit- 
ted through the market were not of the artistic 
quality he endorsed anyway, and the best 
milieu for dealmaking is simply the informal 
atmosphere that currently prevails. The dozen 
or so distributors and buyers in attendance pro- 
vided ample opportunity for relaxed interac- 
tion and included representatives from Prism, 
IRS Releasing, Seventh Art, Fine Line, Cabin 
Fever, Showtime, and the Australian theatrical 
distribution company Beyond. 

True to von Hausch's commitment to first- 
timers, the festival screened a large number of 
debut films. Patrick O'Connor, who made the 
leap from writing to directing with Sacred 
Hearts, said he learned filmmaking by "reading 
books and taking classes to find out how every- 
thing worked. I surrounded myself with people 
I could trust and paid attention." The result 
was a Best First Feature award for his sensitive 
study of a teenage girl's family crisis. Produced 



by Brennen Dicker, the film was shot in only 
13 days on a budget of $60,000. O'Connor 
financed his feature from the sale of Zoo, a 
script he developed during his fellowship at 
the Chesterfield Writer's Film Project. 
Steven Spielberg, who sponsors the 
Chesterfield Project with Universal Studios, 
bought Zoo in 1992. The festival also award- 
ed a Special Jury Prize for Performance to 
Kelly Fritz, the film's young lead. 

Richard Schenkman compared mounting 
his feature directorial debut, The Pompatus of 
Love, to "spending a year and a half pushing 
a rock up a hill with your head." Schenkman 
co-wrote the spec script with pals Jon Cryer 
and Adam Oliensis, who star in the film and 
co-produced it. Cryer, who currently stars in 
Fox TV's Partners, said they tried to get stu- 
dio involvement for more than a year, but 
even with himself and Mia Sara (Ferris 
Bueller's Day Off, Legend) attached, they had 
no luck. Producer D. J. Paul eventually raised 
first funds privately and the French produc- 
tion company Why Not Productions came in 



20 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



for the last 25 percent of the $1.3-million 
budget. 

Doug Tirola, who wrote, directed, and co- 
produced his first feature, A Reason to Believe, 
managed to find more than one innovative 
method of financing. The theme of the 
film — date rape on a midwestern campus — 
is, in Tirola's view, "political, [but] not really 
right nor left." So he scoured the back pages 
of every political magazine for companies 
that bought ad space, reasoning that the ads 
were there "only for support, not to really sell 
anything. Luckilv, a number of them decided 
to invest in the film, but I don't know if that's 
because they really studied the screenplay or 
just that we were passionate about the 
theme." The plan was so successful that he 
and co-producers Ged Dickerson and Chris 
Trela raised the $177,000 needed for produc- 
tion. 

To pay for postproduction, they approach- 
ed Films Inc. and Swank, two nontheatrical 
distributors. When neither was interested, 
they decided to approach colleges directly, 
posing as "Pioneer Talent," representatives of 
nontheatrical releases. What they didn't 
mention was the fact that A Reason to Believe 
was the only film in their catalogue. Tirola 



explains, "They thought they were getting a 
first-run film, but were actually getting a rough 
cut." By offering to book the filmmakers (i.e., 
themselves) as speakers with the screenings, 
they boosted their income from $500 to $1,500 
or $2,000 per night. Their contract included all 
meals and lodging, as well as college T-shirts to 
feed Tirola's souvenir collection. He, Dicker- 
son, and Trela arranged a tour of 20 sites in 40 
days ("It was like being in a band," he says) and 
finished with enough profit to cover their post 
budget. 

For first-time director Julianna Lavin, whose 
Live Nude Girls opened the festival, financing 
was less of a problem. "I had planned to shoot 
in 16mm 'ultra guerrilla style' and fund it with 
credit cards, but I didn't have enough credit." 
Instead, Lavin found strong support from pro- 
ducer/friend Denise Di Novi, who responded 
enthusiastically to the script. Di Novi got the 
ball rolling when she passed the script along to 
her Heathers co-producers, who in turn sold the 
project to Republic Pictures. 

Twilight Highway, a joint first-time writ- 
ing/directing venture by Laurie Taylor- Williams 
and Merce Williams, made its premiere at the 
festival and also picked up a special Jury Prize 
for Most Original Screenplay. Robert Wuhl, a 




seasoned actor and writer, was on hand with his 
directing debut, Open Season, and earned him- 
self the festival's first Renaissance Award for 
writing, starring, and directing. Other winning 
first-timers included Joe and joe, David Wall's 
Outstanding Technical Accomplishment, shot 
on Cape Cod for only $35,000; David Kreiner's 
Israeli film, There Was No War in '72, recipient 
of a special jury prize; and Adam Isidore's Best 
Documentary, Give a Damn Again. 

The top festival awards for Best Film and 
Best Director went to veteran John Schlesinger 
for his parody of D. H. Lawrence novels, Cold 
Comfort Farm. Best Actor went to Sean Astin 
for his role as Rory Cochrane's roommate in 
George Hickenlooper's Low Life, and Piper 
Laurie picked up Best Actress for The Grass 
Harp, directed by Charles Matthau. The 
Monkey Kid by debuting director Xiao Yen- 
Wang received the Best Foreign Film Award. 

Although there is no pressure from the festi- 
val board or sponsors to attract big-budget films 
and stars, local audiences would naturally love 
to see more Hollywood names trooping to 
South Florida. Besides the recipients of 1995's 
Lifetime Achievement awards, Michael Caine 
and Robert Evans, other celebrities on hand 
included J. T Walsh, Mia Farrow, Scott Glenn, 
Peter Riegert, Mia Sara, Dana Delaney, Julie 
Delpy, Phylicia Rashad, and Tim Reid. 

Throughout the year, von Hausch explores 
diverse methods to find support for indepen- 
dents, including active encouragement of film 
production in Florida. The festival works close- 
ly with the local film commission and the 
Florida Entertainment Commission, a private 
corporation whose sole purpose is to bring more 
entertainment to the state. And since "local 
bankers only understand real estate," according 
to von Hausch, they've also made a special 
effort to provide educational seminars about 
film investment opportunities, bringing in 
speakers from New York and L. A. Each year 
during the festival, a series of free educational 
seminars sponsored by Eastman Kodak are 
available to all local filmmakers. This year's fea- 
tured Robert Evans on producing, Lori Wyman 
on casting, and Shane Black on screenwriring. 

Michael Caine, in his acceptance speech for 

the Lifetime Achievement award, paid due 

respect to the festival. "I think what you are 

doing with young unknown people is absolute* 

ly fabulous and obviously absolutely essenti il, 

because it is so hard to gel ahead." It |ust might 

yet a little easier with the kind of real support 

first-timers find in fort Lauderdale. 

Michalene Seller Milne is current!) producing I tog 
Bones am/ Events in Am il 



March 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 21 




Collective Insights 

Four Groups That Have 
"Withstood the Test o£ Time 




by Deborah Reber 

Video and film collectives have come and 
gone during the past quarter century with the 
frequency of fashion trends. A few have with- 
stood the test of time, and four of these were 
highlighted at the Margaret Mead Film and 
Video Festival in New York City last October: 
Amber Films, from Newcastle, England (now 
27 years old); Appalshop, from Whitesburg, 
Kentucky (26 years old); Ateliers Varan, from 
Paris (14 years old); and Sankofa Film and 
Video Collective, from London (12 years old). 
Collectives can bring a great deal of good to 
the communities in which they work: they can 
generate dialogue about culture, identity, and 
society and many teach community members 



how to make their own films and videos explor- 
ing these issues. But because of their nonprofit 
structure and noncommercial goals, collectives 
often lead a tenuous existence. These four 
have beaten the odds just by continuing to 
work for so many years. 

So how have Amber, Appalshop, Ateliers 
Varan, and Sankofa managed to stay together 
for so long, surviving Reaganism, Thatcherism, 
and recessions? The answers vary, but all come 
down to a simple tenet: they are solidly com- 
mitted to the communities with which they 
work. What remains to be seen is whether this 
will be enough to get them through the 
rougher times ahead, as previously reliable 
sources of funding dry up. 



The two oldest, Amber Films and Appal- 

shop, are classic examples of commitment in 
action. More than 25 years after their forma- 
tion, their missions remain essentially the 
same — to create work that involves, edu- 
cates, and engages their communities. 

Amber Films was formed in 1968, when a 
group of progressive film and photography 
students in London pooled their resources. 
Their goal was to use their talents to empow- 
er the marginalized working class in the 
United Kingdom. "There has always been 
pressure for the working class to deny their 
roots and seek a life elsewhere," says Amber 
filmmaker Peter Roberts. "This is the main 
problem with the class system today. So in 
our work we attempt to prove that such a 



22 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



iH 



thing as society still exists." 

In setting out to fulfill this goal, the mem- 
bers of Amber moved from London to 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne in northern England 
in 1969. Roberts calls the move a "defining 
act" for the group. An industrial city of about 
500,000 people, Newcastle provided the per- 
fect setting for Amber. Once they set up 
shop, they subsidized their work as a collec- 
tive with outside projects, because of the 
poor economic climate for independent pro- 
duction in the early seventies. 

Then in 1982, Amber's survival was 
ensured when the Association of 
Cinematography, Television and Allied 
Technicians (ACTT) drafted the Workshop 
Declaration. This mandated the provision of 
funds for specified film and video collectives 
throughout the United Kingdom and forged 
an agreement with Channel 4 in London to 
support these workshops on a broad, opera- 
tional basis, rather than project-by-project. 
"The Workshop Declaration allowed groups 
to experiment in a range of ways and allowed 
for formal exploration and even failure," says 
Roberts. 

Through the eighties, Amber took advan- 
tage of this, experimenting with hybrid forms 
of documentary and fiction film, and some- 
times incorporating still photography and 
animation into their work. They were also 
constantly devising creative ways to self-dis- 
tribute and exhibit their projects and even 
began publishing their own books and 
leaflets. But despite their innovative efforts, 
Roberts isn't very optimistic about Amber's 
future. With an increasingly privatized 
broadcasting industry in the United Kingdom 
and Channel 4's Workshop funding all but a 
thing of the past, there is less money and 
fewer venues for their kind of work. 

Roberts attributes Amber's endurance to 
their ability to integrate themselves com- 
pletely into the Newcastle community over 
the years. Though they came in as "out- 
siders," today they have a very close relation- 
ship with the people. "The community is 
involved in the whole process," says Amher 
filmmaker Sirkka-Liisa Konttinen. "They've 
had previous positive experiences with us, so 
we'll have access to these communities again. 
There's never been a situation where we've 
had different visions, because the people are 
there all along." 

Byker (1985), tor instance, began as a 
photo project by one of the collective mem- 
bers who was living in the eponymous work- 




ing-class town in 
Northeast 
England. She set 
about photo- 

graphing portraits 
of the town's 
occupants, house 
by house. Then as 
the years rolled by 
and the central 
govenment decid- 
ed to demolish the 
"slum," the pro- 
ject turned into a 
documentary 
about the disloca- 
tion of this com- 
munity in order to 
make way for a 
"modern urban- 
ization" project. 
During the 12 
years of Baker's 

production, Amber was given incredible access 
and worked closely with the community, giving 
the work a characteristic strength and depth. 
Similarly, Seacoal (1985), a hybrid fiction/docu- 
mentary film that tells the story of the "sea- 
coalers," or the people who collect coal waste 
washed ashore in the industrial town of 
Lynemouth, was made with the participation of 
its subjects. Again the production team lived 
with the seacoalers for more than two years 
while filming this project and cast them in most 
of the film's parts. This kind of close interaction 
with the subjects of their films ensures that 
Amber's depictions of the working class are a 
true reflection of the community. 

Appalshop mediamaker Mimi Pickering also 

attributes the Kentucky media arts center's 
endurance to close community ties. "We all 
have a commitment and deep concern for the 
region," Pickering says. According to 
Appalshop filmmaker Herb E. Smith, "It's not 
just about making films. There's a war going on, 
and the camera has become part of the equip- 
ment for this war." The war Smith speaks of is 
the war on poverty — a key aspect in the forma- 
tion of Appalshop. 

In 1969, a group of Kentucky filmmakers 
created Appalshop in order to explore different 
aspects of life in the southern Appalachian 
mountains through video. They wanted to 
counter the negative stereotypes about the 
region that popular television shows like The 
Beverly Hillbillies perpetuated. They intended to 



Pot shot: The Kentucky filmmakers of Appalshop document 
their home state's herbal trade in Bluegrass Blackmr- 1 - 

Courtesy Ap~" 



give the community a chance to discover and 
communicate their own identities. "We're 
interested in a long-term relationship with the 
place we're a part of, and we want people to 
have a role in the dialogue about what kind of 
place they want this region to be," says Smith. 

Today, Appalshop's focus has expanded from 
creating videos that explore questions of iden- 
tity to those that address more complex com- 
munity issues, such as land rights, drugs, and 
AIDS. One recent example of their social doc- 
umentaries is Bluegrass, Blackmarket (1994), 
which looks at the illegal marijuana-growing 
industry in the Appalachian hills. Like many 
other Appalshop videos, this documentary uses 
no narration and allows the story to unfold 
through interviews with the people involved. 
Another recent work is Belinda (1992), in 
which a local woman with AIDS personalizes 
the tragedy of the disease, describing her pain 
at the thought of leaving her daughter behind. 
Through Belinda, Appalshop hopes to educate 
the mountain community about AIDS, as there 
are many misconceptions and negatives associ- 
ated with the disease in the Appalachian 
region. "We are still trying to get Belinda out 
into the mainstream churches and other orga- 
nizations, but sometimes it's hard even to give 
tapes away," admits Pickering. 

As traditional funding sources tor the arts 
are being rapidly depleted, Pickering expects 
Appalshop will have to reorganize, although 
the collective continues to receive funding 
from the National Endowment tor the Arts and 
the National Endowment for tbe Humanities, 



March 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 23 




Wildlife 

Lightning 

Time-lapse 

Landscapes 

Aerial Scenics 

Special Effects 

International 

Underwater 

Cityscapes 

Skyscapes 

Landmarks 

Americana 

People 

Clouds 

Sports 



800-iMAGERY 



Largest collection 

of original 

licensable imagery. 

Production ready 

images available in 

all subjects and all 

formats. 

EAST: 212-686-4900 
WEST: 818-508-1444 



YOU CAN SHODT 35MM 

The Independents Guide to 

Taking the Mystery Out of 35mm 



Filmmakers Mark Archer 

and Stephen R. Campanella 

take you on their first 

commercial 35mm film 

shoot along with 

Director of Photography, 

Tony Hettinger and 

Technical Coordinator, 

Johnathan Brower. 

Discover how Steve and Mark's 

"JUST SHOOT IT" attitudes helped them with: 

• Project Conception 'Shooting in 35mm 

• Script • Working with Labs 

• Storyboarding • Editing 

VHS Video only $39.95 

Includes a copy of the original script and 

storyboard. 

flfease add $5.00 for shippins and tiandHng. Indiana residents 

add 5% sates tax and Ohio residents add 7% sales tax.) 



To order, send to: 

TYMETOWER Home Video 

810 Coliseum Blvd. East • Suite 107 

Fort Wayne, IN 46805-1234 

Phone:(219)749-9853 
FAX: (219)483-8301 



FILM A/I DEO ARTS 

Persistence Of Vision ... Since 1968 



On-Line & Off-Line Editing 

Film & video Equipment Rentals 

videotape Duplication 

Film-to-Tape Transfers 

also 



50 Classes Day and Evening 



AVID Training Workshops 
Certificate Programs in Film & Video Production 

Find out why FllmA/ideo Arts has been 

New York's Premiere Media Arts Center for more than 25 years 

Call for a FREE BROCHURE & RATE CARD Today! 



Film/Video Arts • 817 Broadway, 2nd Fl. • NYC 
212/673-9361 (t) • 212/475-3467 (f) 



private foundations, and various state organi- 
zations, . "We're going to have to change in 
the future because of money problems," 
Pickering says. "Whether we downsize or 
upsize remains to be seen." 

The future of Ateliers Varan in Paris is in 
jeopardy due to similar financial constraints. 
During its early years, the collective received a 
substantial part of its budget from the French 
Ministry of Foreign Affairs. This is no longer 
the case, and the collective now has to turn to 
other sources for funding, such as the Swedish 
Agency for International Development, the 
European Group of Film and Television 
Schools, Channel 4, and other television sta- 
tions. As a result of declining resources, the 
collective has been forced to substantially cut 
down on their innovative activities. 

A considerable percentage of Ateliers 
Varan's production costs go towards travel and 
equipment. The filmmakers and anthropolo- 
gists who founded Ateliers Varan in 1981 
wanted to bring the power of film and video to 
people living in areas where media production 
tools wouldn't normally be accessible. So in 
addition to their training school in France, 
Varan has held production workshops in more 
than 14 countries in the developing world. 
Since 1981, Varan has gone to South Africa, 
Bolivia, Mozambique, Portugal, Kenya, 
Mexico, Brazil, Papua New Guinea, the Philip- 
pines and Romania, among others. Varan film- 
maker Perle Mohl feels strongly that "people 
should be able to film in their own society," a 
perspective that is the driving force behind 
their international workshops. 

In these three-step workshops, Varan first 
teaches Hi8 video and 16mm film production, 
then covers more in-depth production issues, 
such as funding and distribution. At the end of 
the workshops, they leave the video equip- 
ment behind, sparking the creation of local 
media centers that continue to produce videos 
and train new mediamakers in the region. 

Their most recent workshop was in 1993 in 
South Africa, where they wanted to provide a 
forum for the black majority to speak out 
about society, as well as play a role in improv- 
ing it. The workshop resulted in the feature- 
length documentary My Vote Is My Secret 
(1994), a video that captures the hopes and 
triumphs of black South Africans during the 
country's first democratic elections. "We want 
to give people ways to stage their own life," 
says Mohl. "In our method, the filmmakers 
and the camera people are actors and partici- 



24 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



(top) An African woman living in London with her children in cramped and dreary 
surroundings tries to keep beauty alive in Sankofa's Home Away from Home. 

Courtesy Women Make Movies 



A Les Ateliers workshop resulted in My Vote Is My Secret, by South Africa's Direct 
Cinema Workshop. Courtesy JBA Production 




pants in the action. Life takes an analytical 
dimension in the filming process." 

Although nearly 20 film professionals and 
cultural anthropologists make up the Varan 
team, only two full-time employees can be 
supported at any given time. Monthly meet- 
ings allow the group to stay informed on pro- 
jects and plan future workshops. Despite the 
success of these workshops — all have result- 
ed not only in documentaries, but have man- 
aged to create media production centers that 
have taken root and survived — only four 
workshops have been 
held outside Paris since 
1985, mostly because of 
their high cost and the 
lack of available 
monies. Nonetheless, 
Mohl expects Ateliers 
Varan to continue, if 
only on a modest level, 
due to its flexible struc- 
ture and rotating staff. 

The Sankofa Film and Video Collective 

similarly can't even afford to maintain a full- 
time staff. Formed by Martina Attille, 
Maureen Blackwood, Robert Crusz, Isaac 
Julien, and Nadine Marsh-Edwards in 1983, 
the London-based collective was formed to 
explore cultural representations of black 
identity in the Western world through film 
and video. In one ot Sankofa's most recent 
films, Home Away from Home (1994), film- 
maker Maureen Blackwood depicts the 
plight of an African woman living in London 
as she attempts to keep her cultural heritage 
alive in her family. In In Between (1992), 
filmmaker Robert Crusz uses both documen- 




tary and dramatic reconstruc- 
tions to explore his personal 
struggle as a Sri Lankan 
searching for his cultural 
identity. 

Because of their innovative 
approaches to self-represen- 
tation, Sankofa has gained 
international recognition for 
their work on issues ranging 
from AIDS to politics to 
migration. They maintain a 
high profile through touring 
exhibitions and participating 
in lecture circuits. But while 
Sankofa continues to receive 
support from Channel 4, the 
British Film Institute, British 
Screen, and Sony (UK), 
Blackwood doesn't believe their reputation 
guarantees them a secure future. 

Blackwood accredits Sankofa's survival to 
their ability to streamline operations. "The peo- 
ple here have a lot of tenacity and courage and 
a firm belief in what we're trying to do. We try 
to organize ourselves in a way that helps us to 
survive," she says. Today, as Channel 4 increas- 
ingly shifts its focus to film projects in the 
developing world, according to NYU's Africana 
Studies professor Steve Gregory, many collec- 
tives in the United 
Kingdom have recently 
dissolved. "We haven't 
received funding for a I* 
number of years now," says 
Blackwood. "A lot of orga- 
nizations who gave us 
money in the early eighties 
are no longer supporting 
us. It makes it difficult. 
Nobody here is getting 
paid a full-time wage, so 
we'll invite people who have worked with us in 
the past to work on certain projects. We have 
more of an open door policy." 

In these day- ot privatization and declining 
funds, these and other collectives face a tough 
battle to stay alive. Despite their common mis- 
sions to create socially relevant media that 
explores identity, culture, and society, they face 
the prospect of becoming increasingly down- 
sized and marginalized. Their challenge is to 
remain a necessary part ol today's broader 
social movements and cultural politics. With 
luck, they'll continue to beat the odds. 

Deborah Reber is an independent videomaker 

who most recently narked with UNK .'/;/• as a 

producer communications consultant. 



MUSIC CENTRAL 

is proud to announce 

the first record label 

devoted exclusively to 

documentary soundtracks: 




A division of Music Central, Inc. 
Distributed nationally by: 



Qar»"N£ 



If you are an independent 
filmmaker, call Robert Fish 
at (212) 840-3285 to discuss 

how Music Central and 

Docutrax can serve all your 

music and soundtrack needs. 




^ s^J 



musi c c: F. N T R A L 



260 WEST 39TH STREET, I Kill FLOOR 
V E W YORK. N I. Vi YORK 10018 
2 1 2 • 840 • 3 28 5/FAX : 2 1 2 • 840 • 39 2 3 



March 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 25 






^W"*'" 




From their Cambridge, Mass., apartment, Valerie Lalonde and Richard Leacock talk about 
their recent collaborations and his marathon career. Photo: Kurt Winokur 




Leacock's 
ife Lessons 

iRichard Leacock and coproducer Valerie 
Lalonde talk about their new videos and his 
|60 years of documentary production. 

Richard Leacock is one of the creators of the documentary film movement that we now call cinema verite. Born 
in London in 1921, he was raised in the Canary Islands, where he made his first film, Canary Bananas, at the 
age of 14- After graduating from Harvard University and serving as an Army cameraman in WWII, he worked 
with Robert Flaherty on Louisiana Story. He then went on to make or work on most of the defining direct cin- 
ema documentaries of the fifties and sixties. He taught film at MIT from 1 968 until he retired in the eighties, 
when he moved to France and started making video documentaries with Valerie Lalonde. 

This conversation took place in November 1995 in an apartment that Leacock and Lalonde keep in 
Cambridge, Massachusetts. They were in town so Leacock could receive the Boston Film/Video Foundation's 
1995 Vision Award. On March 31, he will appear at the Brooklyn Academy of Music on the occasion of Virgil 
Thomson's centenary to present and discuss excerpts from Louisiana Story, which Thomson scored. 

IND: Let's start with the present. What are you and Valerie doing now? 

RL: When I left MIT, tired, and went to Paris, my idea was to make a film in a medium where I could feel free to 
shoot when I wanted to shoot. I said, "What happens if we go out with an instrument that you can actually use, 
without saying 'one dollar, two dollars, three dollars' when you run the camera?" In a sense, I was saying, "Let's 
do a film about nothing in particular." At this point I met Valerie, and she started showing me her France. And 
we just carried these little tiny cameras for two years. 

IND: You started with 8mm cameras? 

RL: Video 8. 

VL: Not Hi8. It didn't exist then. 

RL: The one I loved best was the one that had no zoom. It had three focusing positions: mountains, people, heads. 

VL: That's what I learned on. 

RL: I still think it was a wonderful camera. A great deal of our first film [Les oeufs a la coque de Richard Leacock 
{The soft-boiled eggs of Richard Leacock)] was shot on it. Absolutely simple, trivial to carry. We ended up with a 
hundred hours. I recently came across a list of subjects that I thought would be in the film. Not one oi them was. 



by George Fifield 



March 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 27 



VL: Apart from the eggs. 

RL: Except the eggs. Editing it was, I was going to say it was a 
nightmare; it wasn't a nightmare. A nightmare always ends when 
you meet the impossible. 

VL: We edited all the sequences. 

RL: Yeah, we just made sequences. They had nothing to do with 
each other. Somehow there is an internal logic in it. But it was 
hell's own blight to find that. 

VL: When he [started editing] I went away, because I realized he 
was doing a love story, so I felt sad. I went to my mother's and I 
said 1 wouldn't come back until he'd got twenty minutes thrown 
together. I came back a week later, and he had an hour and a half. 
[We] more or less stuck to that. 

IND: Les oeufs starts with a funeral. 

RL: Yes, the funeral of Henri Langlois [founder of the 
Cinematheque Franchise] . 

IND: I thought that was your way of saying "the death of film." 

RL: That's right. Because [documentary maker] Jean Rouch said 
in the film, 
when they 
were demol- 
ishing the 
Palais du Festi- 
val in Cannes, 
"It is the end 
of cinema." He 
really feels 
that; he calls 
video "the 
AIDS of cine- 
ma." So Valerie's voice says in the film, "Cinema is dead, long live 
video!" 

The point is that we could do what we wanted. At first, we 
went directly to Beta-SP; now we go directly to Beta digital, and 
edit digital to digital. The quality is absolutely astounding! 
Nobody but some technical who-hah counting pixels can tell the 
difference. 

We've proved our point. We've been on every major network in 
Europe: French national TV (La Tois); Arte [the Franco-German 
arts show] ; Channel Four in England; NDR in Germany; Austrian 
television. You name it. We've had no problems. However, if a 
young person goes to a TV station and says, "I want to do a film 
on video 8," they'll treat you like dirt. This used to be true in 
16mm. In the sixties everybody sneered at 16mm. 

IND: Valerie, you started shooting on Rehearsal: The Killings of 
Cariolal 

VL: I started shooting a bit on Les oeufs a la coque. I never shot 
before I met Ricky. I didn't agree with all this heavy equipment, I 
didn't see the point. On [Rehearsal], I was backstage with the 
actresses a lot of time, actually working with them, rather than 
shooting. Then I started shooting because that girl Jane was so 
beautiful, with her blonde hair. In fact, I got the key scene. So 
that's when I became indispensable to him. He had to accept me. 



RL: From there on, I just get jealous of her. Because she hasn't 
been through all these ritual trainings, Valerie is less hung up on 
some very weird old traditions as to how you shoot something. 

VL: I learned by looking at him shoot. The way he moves when 
he shoots. And looking at all the rushes, since we were sharing 
our lives. 

RL: I think we have another thing in common. It's not really a 
seduction, but the fitting in with the people you're filming. You 
have to be very very cautious about shooting too much, because 
all of a sudden it becomes the major thing that's going on. You 
want to be very selective, making it clear you [can] put the cam- 
era down, put it away. You want them to have you around even if 
you are not shooting. It's a very complex thing. There are no rules 
for it. 

IND: What are you shooting now? 

RL: Heaven knows whether this will work; I'm scared stiff as 
usual. I wrote letters to my late wife from the Army all the way 
through World War II. There are five hundred typed pages of let- 
ters. I was a combat cameraman from 1942 to '45, mostly in 
Burma and China. We were shooting 35mm — handheld spring- 




wound camera, one roll of film: one minute. Longest shot was fif- 
teen seconds before you had to rewind, maybe longer. 

I want to make a book of the text and with it a videodisc that 
gives you the feeling of being there. Not another bloody war 
film — bang, bang, bang, symphonic music, here we are entering 
the gates, liberating this, that, and the other thing. No, I want to 
show what it was like. This on Friday, this on Saturday. We've just 
started. We've found six rolls, six minutes. 

IND: That you shot? 

RL: Yeah, with my slate on it. 

VL: I shot him finding it. 

RL: And it's absolutely astounding: A Burmese man being exe- 
cuted by O.S.S., setting fire to a village, that sort of thing. Very 
steadily shot. [Laughter] No sound, of course. We have no idea 
how these things will go together, but I think they will. 

IND: But you have the letters, the original footage, the footage 
that you're shooting now and... 

RL: And my memories. 

IND: How did you end up in the film unit as a cameraman — from 
Harvard into the United States Army? 



28 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



RL: I'd been a professional cameraman already when I was at 
Harvard. [But] I had majored in Physics. We knew about the 
atom bomb. [My professor] had outlined what Uranium 235 
could do. [He] calculated that a cubic meter of this stuff would 
blow the whole of New England off the face of the earth. 

I wanted to go fight the Nazis and didn't want to go to some 
bloody research institute, [so] I kept very quiet about the physics 
stuff. I said I was a cameraman, and by absolute miraculous fluke, 
I was assigned to the Signal Corps photo center and trained as a 
combat cameraman. No complaints. 

IND: After the war, you met up with Robert Flaherty, whom 
you'd met before, and he asked you to come with him to 
Louisiana to shoot Louisiana Story. 

RL: Yeah. Our families had been sort of intermixed. My sister 
had ghost-written a book with Mrs. Flaherty, and he had seen 
Canary Bananas [Leacock's first film]. And he liked me. I was 
strong, healthy, and that was enough. He really needed an assis- 
tant. It grew into being a full cameraman and a very, very 
respectful relationship. 

It wasn't easy to shoot the way Flaherty shot. It was contrary 




Soft-boiled eggs and other images from Leacock and Lelonde's first video, Les oeufs a 
la coque de Richard Leacock. All photos courtesy videomakers 

to everything you'd learned anywhere. He was a precursor to 
everything we're doing now. He would shoot everything he 
thought was beautiful or interested him or attracted him, even if 
it wasn't in the script. 

IND: He'd get sidetracked? 

RL: Yes, for days. It was very expensive. That's why he couldn't 
work with a crew, ever. It was just him, myself, Mrs. Flaherty, 
occasionally an assistant to help carry things. And we followed 
his nose around; it was extraordinary. Then when I went back to 
working with regular directors who knew exactly what they 
wanted, it was very difficult. 

IND: You have said about working with Flaherty that "the uncer- 
tainty was infectious." 

RL: Oh, yes. You were looking tor miracles. 1 am an enormous 
admirer of Flaherty, obviously. I think he invented the sequence. 
We went to a colloquium in Marseilles of early ethnographic 
films, and they were shots, shots, shots, just shots, mostly people 
with dark skins. Then boom, out of no place: hlanook of the 
North. The building the igloo, the way it involves the entire fam- 
ily — it's absolutely galvanizing. Still today, it has an extraordinary 
effect on the audience. Then we saw shots, shots, shots from .ill 



these other expeditions, and then we saw Moana [directed by 
Flaherty] from 1926. Again, a series of sequences, absolutely 
immaculate beautiful sequences, each telling their little story. 

Now this doesn't mean that there aren't problems in Flaherty's 
films. There was only one thing he could do, which was get into 
[commercial movie houses]. There wasn't any other forum for 
looking at movies at that time, and he had to compete with 
Hollywood, which was very very difficult. Where is the love story? 
Where is the crime? So he got sponsored by outside people. 
Nanook was sponsored by Revillion Fur, a fur company in France. 
Moana was paid for by Paramount, so they still have their claws on 
it. 

IND: Louisiana Story was paid for by Standard Oil. 

RL: It was a very oily film. The films are full of problems because 
of what I call the audience pleasers. Every one of them has a tug 
of war in it: Nanook and the seal, J. C. in Louisiana Story with the 
alligator. These are dumb sequences. They are audience pleasers. 
They are not the miraculous parts. He knew that. 

The miraculous parts of Flaherty for me are where he makes 
sequences of very simple processes, that are a revelation. In 
Louisiana Story, the mystery of the appearance of the rig. It's a 
huge rig. You never, in whole film, see a long shot of the rig. It was 
just a perfectly ordinary rig, but the way it is dealt with visually 
makes it the tallest rig in the world. 

We first did the whole drilling sequence in the daytime. We 
were running out of time, money, everything, [but] Flaherty said 
we were going to reshoot it at night. I said you're crazy, but I went 
to Woolworth's and bought some clip-on lights and lit up the rig 
and climbed all over the whole bloody thing. We did it at night, 
and it went like greased lighting. It was right. It isolated the action 
from the background. He was a man afflicted with getting it right. 
But it was very difficult. 

We shot magnificent footage of an oil refinery. According to the 
contract with Standard Oil, that had to be in the film. We shot all 
this wonderful stuff. Everything we loved about the oil refinery 
[couldn't be shown, because it] turned out to be illegal: flames, 
smoke, flickering lights, and things. 

IND: All the visual things. 

RL: There is nothing more glorious visually than pollution. 
Smoking factory chimneys used to mean progress. That's a prob- 
lem. There is nothing more boring, probably, than a well ordered 
society. 

IND: The next film that you regard as important in your career is 
Jazz Dance. 

RL: That was a wild liberation. That crazy man, [director] Roger 
Tilton, asked me to shoot Jazz Dance. Everybody had told him, 
since it had to be synched sound, that you must use these enor- 
mous cameras. We didn't. We used the handheld, same as combat 
shooting. First I got off the tripod. With Flaherty everything was 
on a tripod. And I had learned during the war that I don't like 
tripods. 

VL: They are never in the right place. 

RL: Yes, even a small one. It's wrong. InJdZZ Dance we just went 

wild shooting. And they managed to edit everything so it looks 



March 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 29 



like it is in synch. 

IND: You once said about Bernstein in Israel that the interesting 
thing about that film was what you didn't get. 

RL: Yes. I was sent by Omnibus, the TV program. Lenny and I 
were great friends. We had done a 
couple of plays and an opera at 
Harvard when he was [Serge] 
Kousevitsky's assistant [at the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra]. He 
used to play at the film society at 
Harvard. When we needed some- 
one to play the piano, Lenny would 
do it for ten dollars a night. 

IND: For the silents. 

RL: Battleship Potemkin with music by Leonard Bernstein. He was 
very good at it; he liked it. 

He was going to conduct the dedicatory concert to a new audi- 
torium in Tel Aviv. It was a great big concert hall. I took a gam- 
ble: I had never used 16mm sound before. I took a 16mm sound 
Oricon, which was a big camera with optical sound recorded on 
the edge. We knew 
that would be pret- 
ty lousy sound, so 
we took along one 
of the early Ampex 
portable tape- 
recorders. It 
weighed about 30 
pounds in a suit- 
case, and it was 
nonsynch. This is 
1958 — relatively 
new. We took a 
sound man and got a 

crew in Israel. We had a wonderful crew. And we missed every- 
thing! 

By which I mean, we were setting up the camera in the concert 
hall, and there were all these carpenters hammering and chiseling 
and making an unbelievable racket. And Lenny, rehearsing the 
orchestra, just lost his temper. He splattered all over the ceiling, 
screaming and yelling. And we still had about three more plugs to 
plug in. So we missed it. You can't go up and say, "Lenny, do you 
mind doing that over again?" 

One night, Lenny and Felicia, in the hotel room on a little 
piano, performed almost the whole of West Side Story for their 
friends. Where was the camera? It was in a truck parked in a 
garage someplace. 

So I realized that that became my goal. You had to film, not a 
concert — that's relatively easy — but a rehearsal, with perfect 
sound and mobile camera with no strings attached. You can't lift 
a connecting cable over the first violin who is in the middle of the 
music. That really defined what it was we needed. I was already 
working with [Robert] Drew trying to define it. 

IND: There were technical obstacles to hand-held synch sound 
that at this point began to be solved. You joined up with and made 



a series of documentaries with Robert Drew. The first was 
Primary, about the 1959 Wisconsin Presidential primary. Who 
followed Kennedy and who followed Humphrey? Or were you all 
following everybody? 

RL: This is very contentious. Drew says that we were hired to do 

what we were told, more or 

less. Actually, Drew and I had 

the only synch rig, an Auricon 

with a cable attaching us to a 

tape recorder, which Drew car- 

RONY IS ried. The others were shooting 

wild, but we had a system that 

had been developed for Drew 

by a Hollywood sound man, 

where we could adjust sound 

and post- synchronize it without changing the pitch. It was a quite 

fancy rig. [D. A.] Pennebaker was mostly in charge of that. 

IND: That was an editing device, not something you carried with 
you while shooting. 

RL: Yes. The shooting was by Pennebaker, [Albert] Maysles, 



A LOT OF PEOPLE THINK THAT 



HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY IS A SORT OF MEAN FILM. 



KNOW A LOT OF PEOPLE TEACH THAT. 



A BETTER WORD. IT'S AN IRONIC FILM 




Scenes from Le Trou dans la Mer (L & Ctr.) & Les oeufs a la coque de Richard Leacock (R) 

Courtesy videomakers 



Terry MacCartney-Filgate, and me. In 
general, I followed Kennedy, but not always. A lot of the synch 
sound was Drew and me. The last scene in Kennedy's hotel suite, 
I was just alone. I simply parked a tape recorder behind Kennedy's 
chair and left it on. 

IND: It was connected by cable to you? 

RL: No, I had synchronous sound. [Leacock leaves the room and 
returns with his Auricon camera] A hundred foot wind. It takes 
four and a half minutes, and it takes optical sound. 

IND: [Reading] Sixteen Millimeter Sound on Film Auricon 

RL: That's what we started with. Oh god, it's heavy. And the 
sound is pretty bad. But we had the tape deck also. At least the 
Auricon told us where the sound was. 

IND: That scene in Kennedy's hotel suite became one of the 
defining direct cinema moments. The other one that I think of in 
Primary is the long walking shot following Kennedy through the 
crowd at the Milwaukee meeting hall. 

RL: Pennebaker had bought a 5.7mm wide angle lens, which was 
very wide angle for those days. A bug eye lens. He and Al cooked 
that up. So Al shot that shot. I am actually in it, if you look with 
a magnifying glass at the top of the frame as he walks through the 



30 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



Filmography 



hall. Al was having huge fun with that. 

That caused more bad shooting than 
any other shot in history. Everybody start- 
ed walking about with bug-eye lenses on. 
It's like, you know, the Steadicam has cre- 
ated a plethora of bad shooting. The 
importance of Primary still hasn't been 
understood. The fact that there are no 
interviews is staggering in a film of that 
sort. There are no people talking to cam- 
eras. It's unbelievable. That still hasn't 
been understood by the industry or televi- 
sion at all. 

IND: After working for three years with 
Robert Drew, you started Leacock 
Pennebaker, Inc., with D. A. Pennebaker. 
For your first film, you made Happy 
Mother's Day with Joyce Chopra, about the 
media circus surrounding the birth of 
quintuplets in South Dakota. 

RJL: Drew broke off with Time Life, which 
had financed the whole venture. We had 
three glorious years where they had put up 
a lot of money. It was an extraordinary 
experiment. But they weren't getting any- 
place, apparently. So Drew went with the 
only network that was interested in what 
he was doing, which was ABC. And 
Penney and I, rightly or wrongly, didn't 
want to be part of a network news service, 
because it was getting more and more 
departmentalized. You're a cameraman, 
you're an editor, you're a reporter. And I 
simply don't believe in departmentaliza- 
tion of filmmaking. 

IND: You're a filmmaker. 

RL: That's what I believe. So Pennebaker 
and I split off. We were in desperation; we 
had no money, no nothing. I was asked by 
a friend of mine who was editor of the 
Saturday Evening Post to make a film of the 
event that they had just bought the right 
to exploit, the quintuplets. Joyce Chopra 
and I went down. But it didn't get shown. 
That film was rejected by the sponsors, 
Curtis Publications. The editor of the 
Saturday Evening Post loved it, but his boss 
didn't. 

IND: Then Curtis Publications gave your 
footage to ABC and they recur it.' 

RL: They took all the footage. It was their 
footage. They recut it. 

VL: Have you seen the official version 
[The Fischer Quintuplets]! It is so kitsch. 

C lonrinued on />. 60 



The following is an annotated list of the films mentioned in this arti- 
cle, and by no means represents a complete list of Richard 
Leacock's films. 



1935 Canary Bananas 



antation. 



15 min. 



16mm. Filmed on his 



35mm. Directed by 



1946 Louisiana Story 80 min., 35mm. Directed by 

Robert Flaherty 

1954 Jazz Dance 20 min., 35mm. Directed by Roger 

Tilton, photographed by Richard Leacock and Robert Campbell. All hand 
held. A celebration of be-bop, filmed in one night in a dance hall. 

1954 Toby in the Tall Corn 30 min., 35mm. Written, directed, 

photographed, and edited by Leacock. Leacock's first television film. A 
visit to a traveling tent theater show in Missouri; with Russell Lynes, for 
the Omnibus TV series. 

1958 Bernstein in Israel 30 min., 16mm. A close look at 

the young Leonard Bernstein on a conducting tour. 

1960-63 Joined Robert Drew Associates. Worked on a series of major doc- 
umentaries including: 

1960 Primary 60 min., 16mm. Produced by Robert Drew. The race 
between John F Kennedy and Hubert Humphrey in the Wisconsin prima- 
ry. Leacock is alone with Kennedy and his staff in the hotel suite when the 
election results come in. 

Other Robert Drew films that Leacock worked on include The Chair 
(1960), Yanki No! (1960), The Children Were Watching (1960), On the Pole 
(Eddie Sachs) (1961), and Crisis: Behind a Presidential Commitment (1962). 

1963-68 Formed Leacock Pennebaker, Inc., which was responsible 

for many of the best documentaries of the era, including Don't Look Back 
(1966) and Monterey Pop (1968). 

1963 Happy Mother's Day 30 min., 16mm. With Joyce 

Chopra. A report on the birth of quintuplets to Mr. and Mrs. Fischer of 
Aberdeen, South Dakota. During the filming Leacock and Chopra became 
aware of the media and commercial exploitation of the quintuplets and 
made that the focus of the film. The film's sponsor then used the original 
footage to produce an "official" version titled The Fischer Quintuplets. 

In 1968 started teaching at MIT. Continued to make various films includ- 
ing Community of Praise (1981) for the acclaimed Middletown series, and 
Lulu in Berlin (1984). Retired from MIT and settled in Paris. Met and 
started working with Valerie Lelonde, entirely in video. 

1991 Les oeufs a la coque de Richard Leacock 60 min., Video-8. 
Directed by Richard Leacock and Valerie Lalonde. This lovely video is a 
perfectly balanced series of short vignettes about the French people. Their 
love of music, food, fishing and gossip are all punctuated by the ritual of 
opening and eating the soft boiled egg, I'oeuf a la coque. It was sponsored 
by Andre Boutang for the French television program Oceaniques and has 
aired on French TV (FR-3), La Sept (cable), and on German TV (NDR) 

1992 Rehearsal: The Killings of Cariola 30 min., Hi8. Directed by 
Richard Leacock and Valerie Lalonde. This documents rehearsals for a 
performance of The Duchess of Malfi by the Chareb Company in London. 

1993 Gott Sei Dank 30 min., Mixed film and 
video. In the late eighties, Leacock visits his friend Helga Feddersen short- 
ly before her death. Later, he made this documentary mixing it with 
excerpts from a film they made together of Paul Burkhard, composer of 
"Oh! Mein Papa!" It aired on NDR (German television) in 1994. 



HE AMPAIGN GAME 



Some politicans play the campaign game on 
TV. Some play it on the streets, block by 

BLOCK, HANDSHAKE BY HANDSHAKE. 

BUT WHICHEVER NEW OR 
TRIED-AND-TRUE WAY 



Patricia Thomson 



CA 



r IT,i ,a 'k'lf i d¥ Yd*" a^e$ 

a three-part series about 
the culture of political campaigns. three 
stalwart independents — louis alvarez, 
Andrew Kolker, and Paul Stekler — are 
behind this series, which will cap off pbs's 
elect i o n -year programming next fall. 




ANK SHEINKOPF FAN- 
CIES HIMSELF A FORCE 
FOR GOOD. This political 
consultant, who has mastermind- 
ed countless attack ads for 
Southern Democrats and is now 
preparing President Clinton's 
spots, proudly calls himself "the 
Avenger." "I'm serious. These are had people," he says of the 
Republican opposition. 

Sheinkopf is on the phone, pummelling one client with advice 
while another, an Alabama judge sheathed in a black robe, 
stands off to the side, nervously running through his lines for a 
TV spot. Sheinkopf, a consummate New Yorker, is intense and 
insistent as he leans into the phone receiver: "You have to be 
prepared to kick the shit out of this guy and leave him dead on 
the street." 

Later, he and his producer examine a newspaper photo of an 
opponent they're using in an attack ad. "That looks like a mug 
shot," he says approvingly. "What can we do to make it look 
worse?" 



This is all in a day's work for a televi- 
sion CAMPAIGN that combination of political advertis- 
ing, photo op, and sound bite. It's a type of campaign we all 
know by heart, and it seems everyone's doing it. But the TV 

32 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



campaign is not the only road to political office. 

"For most campaigns in the U.S., television isn't the way that 
people win," says Paul Stekler, a political scientist and coproduc- 
er of Vote for Me: Politics in America, a three-part series for PBS 
currently in postproduction. "The vast majority of offices are 
fairly low level," he explains. "So what we tend to think of as 
TV-dominated campaigns are really restricted to the Senate, 
gubernatorial, and some House seats, maybe some mayoral races. 
'Retail,' grassroots campaigning is more important than the 
media gives credit for. Our series covers both." 

The series, Politics in America, gives an inside view of "what 
political culture is and what candidates go through," according 
to Stekler, who is coproducing it with Louis Alvarez and 
Andrew Kolker. It has taken the trio to more than 30 states, 
where they've interviewed or shot campaign footage of dozens of 
politicians, often in the heat of battle, including Mario Cuomo, 
Pete Wilson and Kathleen Brown, Ann Richards and George 
Bush, Jr., Barney Frank, Alan Simpson, Bob Dole, Phil Gramm, 
Pat Buchanan, and Newt Gingrich. 

But don't expect a "Road to the White House '96." In fact, 
most of the faces in this series will be unfamiliar, belonging to 
local politicians and political hopefuls, and most of the races 
date from 1994. Like the trio's earlier collaboration, Louisiana 
Boys — Raised on Politics (1992) — a chronicle of Louisiana's 1987 
and 1991 gubernatorial races and a look back at 50 years of gov- 
ernors in that state, which also captures the carnivalesque and 
at times corrupt character of Louisiana politics — the new series 
will examine politics from a cultural, anthropological perspec- 
tive. And it will do so with a good dose of irreverent humor, 




which will no doubt result 
in something that's a far 
cry from your typical PBS 
documentary on politics. 

And yet, Politics in 
America has been warmly 
embraced by the folks at 

public television, from the top guns to the station programmers. 
Not only has the series managed to get substantial financial sup- 
port from PBS and CPB; what's more, it was called the "center- 
piece" of PBS's campaign '96 coverage by top PBS executive 
Erwin Duggan. 

Scheduled for broadcast in October, the series is part of PBS's 
year-long "The Democracy Project," which subsumes more than 
100 hours of programming, including profiles of the challengers 
and final contenders, specials hosted by conservative commenta- 
tors Ben Wattenberg and William F. Buckley, and an American 
Experience on the explosive 1968 Democratic Convention. 

Politics in Americas inclusion within the Democracy Project 
makes Alvarez, Stekler, and Kolker mighty proud — and slightly 
stunned. They're still shaking their heads over the fact that 
they — three died-in-the-wool independents — have not only 
cracked PBS, but stumbled onto center stage, with trumpets 
blaring. 




nighttime in the 
projects on the 
South Side of 
Chicago, where the 

thermometer has dipped to 10 degrees. Two black men in their 
thirties armed with a stack of posters huddle near a utility pole. 
They're engaged in a Chicago specialty: political sign wars. It's a 
game of attrition, with each camp trying to tear down or cover 
up the posters their opponents put up during the day. These two 
crusaders think they've found the key to victory for alderman 
challenger Tyrone Kenner: "They'd need a twelve-foot ladder 
and a six-foot person with a two-foot arm-reach to get this 
down," one confidently explains, before moving on to plaster 
over incumbent Dorothy "the Hat" Tillman's posters with their 
own. 



This is another kind of campaign, the 

BLOCK' BY- BLOCK, door-by-door quest for votes— the 
"retail" campaign — that relies on volunteers rather than airtime 
and entails the kind of pavement pounding and flesh pressing 
that might seem a thing of the past, but in tact is alive and well 
all across the country. 

In Chicago, both the remnants of the old Democratic 
Machine and the new ethnic coalitions engage in this street- 



March 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 33 



level campaigning. On the South Side, aldermen display their 
posters on pushcart-style garbage cans, so everyone knows whom 
to thank for garbage pick-up. In the Spanish- speaking Pilsen dis- 
trict, a Mexican-American alderman meets with constituents 
who complain about their deteriorating sidewalks — which he 
doggedly traverses as he hunts for votes. In Chicago's Northwest 
Side, a veteran volunteer for Irish alderman Brian Dougherty 
tramps from one identical brick house to the next, approaching 
those showing shamrock decorations with added confidence. 
Meanwhile, Dougherty is busy trying to retain his seat by keep- 
ing his constituents happy. It's not always easy. 

"There was somebody claiming there was a crow attacking 
their kids," recalls Stekler. "So the alderman called and said, 
'Okay, I want a description of this crow, 'cause we don't want to 
get the wrong crow.' " He laughs, then adds, "They talk about 
how they're half social workers, because they've gotta deal with 
every crazy request. It's not only garbage cans." 

A good portion of one hour of Politics in America will be 
devoted to Chicago and the campaigns of four alderman — a 
Mexican American, African American, Irish American, and 
Puerto Rican. "In Chicago, 
aldermen are elected by only 
2,000 or 3,000 votes, but the 
reason we're covering that 
stuff," explains Stekler, is 
because "those small things 
lead to an understanding of 
urban politics, ethnic poli- 
tics. 

Urban politics is one of 
several "archetypes" exam- 
ined in the series, says 
Stekler, as are southern poli- 
tics and negative campaigns. 
Politics in America's other 
broad themes include the 
experience of Washington 

outsiders running for office; the "eternal campaign" that incum- 
bents face; and the impact of lobbyists, the media, and new 
technology on the electoral process. 

One of the questions they ask is, Does the increasing presence 
of "minority" candidates — ethnic politicians, religious funda- 
mentalists, women, gays and lesbians — change the system, or 
does the system change them? It's what the producers call "the 
assimilationist paradox." 

"The way the American system is set up, it promotes compro- 
mise. It does not promote extremes," says Alvarez . "We have 
two big parties. Since they're big, they tend to encompass a 
range of opinions, as opposed to European- style politics," with 
its multiple, finely subdivided parties. 

"One of the stories we're trying to cover is, What happens if 
you approach politics as a game of moral absolutes, when politics 
is essentially a game of compromise? 

"Every group does that," he continues. "Especially groups that 
are newly part of the process. ..It doesn't have to do with ideolo- 
gy; it has to do with, Are you selling out our community by buy- 
ing into the way the system works?' It's an eternal dilemma." 



Plaquemines Pa] 
on the southei 

with one road leading in 




T'S 1980 IN 

i, an isolated area 
>st tip of Louisiana, 

lut, and far more water than land. 
But this remote corner of the South has a greater concentration 
of oil reserves than any other part of the country. 

That's not all that makes it unique. This year it's holding its 
first free election in 50 years. For half a century, the patriarch of 
the wealthiest family enjoyed near dictatorial control over the 
parish. But when the oil baron retired and tried to pass the 
torch to his two sons, their bitter feud ultimately shattered the 
family's power base. And so the Blacks, Creoles, Italian 
Americans, Yugoslavians, and smattering of Filipinos who lived 
and toiled in Plaquemines Parish finally were able to participate 
in an unrigged election. 

Every day for five months, 
Alvarez and Kolker drove from 
New Orleans to the parish to 
make their first major video as 
partners. "The whole thing 
about 'politics is local' — that's 
what Ends of the Earth is about; 
all politics is really local," says 
Alvarez. "There's a scene I just 
love, where they're saying, 'Find 
out about the old Becnel store; 
there are five votes over there. 
That could be really important.' 
"In many ways, what we're 
doing now [with Politics in 
America], there are definite 
echoes," he reflects. Attention 
to small, low-level races, for one, and the sense that not all vot- 
ers are blase. "The Blacks and mixed races had candidates for 
the first time," Alvarez continues. "You could really see how this 
election made a difference in people's lives." 



Alvarez and Kolker met in 1975 at the 
New Orleans Video Access Center 

(NO VAC), a media center that was then run as a collec- 
tive. Both were transplants from the North. Kolker, fresh from 
Clark University in Wooster, Massachusetts, "went down for 
Mardi Gras and stayed for 10 years." Alvarez, after graduating 
from the University of Wisconsin, signed up as a Vista volunteer, 
our domestic Peace Corps, and was sent to New Orleans to 
make TV for low income communities. At NOVAC, he and 
Kolker produced programming about gentrification, health care 
for the poor, and perceptions of urban crime. After five years at 
NOVAC, the two split off (tired of having a collective "looking 
over their shoulder," Alvarez explains) and entered a partner- 
ship that has lasted over 15 years. 



34 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



"In those days, we were feeling, 'What could we contribute? 
Why should we make films?'" recalls Alvarez. "We thought, 
'Look at your own backyard and at places that have not been 
overexposed in the media.' And we were very fiercely 
Louisiana-centric. It's an amazing place and there's a story 
sprawling out of every window, and it hasn't been done to 
death. We felt we could really make a difference, be honest to 
Louisiana, and also get our message out to a larger audience." 

Alvarez and Kolker went on to make a number of documen- 
taries in Louisiana and later in New York (where they moved in 
1985) that can all be seen as a form of cultural anthropology. 
Their two most popular are Yeah You Rite! (1985), about New 
Orleans language and accents, and American Tongues (1987), a 
national version of the same concept. "Yeah You Rite! was the 
earliest example of the Andy and Louie' style," says Alvarez: "A 
lot of humor, a lot of depending on real people, and trying to 
discuss a subject that is fairly fresh in the world of TV." 
(Booming sales of these tapes, which the partners self-distribute 
along with their other videos, has allowed them to keep their 
SoHo office running.) 

Before hooking up with Paul Stekler to make Louisiana Boys, 
neither Alvarez nor Kolker had much direct experience with 
politics beyond their work on Ends of the Earth. In 1968, the 
16-year-old Kolker campaigned for Eugene McCarthy in 
Scranton, Pennsylvania, where things were "totally run by the 
Democratic machine. What they did was blatantly illegal," he 
recalls with a laugh, with voters from cemetery rolls, bosses 
pamphleting inside the polling place, and husbands and wives 
sharing the same voting booth. "I was attacked on election day 
for reporting irregularities," he says. The whole experience 
"probably made me somewhat cynical." 

Alvarez's first brush with electoral politics was not any more 
wholesome. When at NOV AC, he wanted to shift from being a 
Vista volunteer to earning a government- supported salary 
through the CETA program. "We knew someone at City Hall," 
he recalls, "hut the quid pro quo was, we had to campaign for 
his candidate for one afternoon, stuffing mailboxes." 

Which he did, and in the process got his first taste of New 
Orleans-style politics. "It was basically a political pay-off," he 
admits good-humoredly. 

Both Alvarez and Kolker consider themselves generalists. 
"I'm not a political junkie," says Kolker. "I'm not like Paul; I 
don't take the Almanac of Politics in America home with me." 

If Alvarez and Kolker provide Politics in America with the 
irreverent, light touch, it's Stekler who ensures its political acu- 
ity. Charactersitally, his is the editing suite that displays dozens 
of old campaign huttons and posters. Trained as a political sci- 
entist at Harvard, Stekler headed to New Orleans to teach at 
Tulane. He was put in touch with Alvarez and Kolker in 1982 
when he had an idea for a film about Black politics in the New 
South, hut didn't know the first thing about producing. 

"I called them up and said, 'Hi, I'm Paul Stekler. I've been 
thinking about making a film. I heard you guys know how. Can 
you tell me.'' And they said, 'Sure! Come on over.' " 

Stekler learned the ropes and produced his first project, 
Hands Thai Picked Cotton, then a 



second, Among Brothers, about the 1985 election for mayor in 
New Orleans. Then Stekler, Alvarez, and Kolker hooked up for 
Louisiana Boys (edited and coproduced by Anne Craig) , but 
wound up postproducing it long distance. Stekler had moved to 
Boston to become a producer on the Eyes on the Prize civil rights 
series, and Alvarez and Kolker had made the move to New York 
City. 

Aired on PO.V in 1992, Louisiana Boys put the trio on the 
map, especially among politicians. "One of the weird things 
about showing Louisiana Boys on PO.V was it got an incredible 
mount of attention in Washington," Stekler recalls. "Even the 
people who didn't see it had heard about it, like [Clinton strate- 
gist] James Carville." Subsequently, politicians being courted by 
the producers to appear in Politics in America would stop to 
watch the cassette, "even in the white heat of the campaign," 
Alvarez says. "They're junkies. They can't not watch." 




HERE ARE CANDIDATES WHO 
RUN AS "OUTSIDERS, even though their resumes and 
Rolodexes prove them otherwise. Then there are those who 
don't have to pretend. 

A mountain girl from North Carolina who became a popular 
television journalist — a local Charles Kurault — Maggie Lauterer 
decided to run for Congress in part to prove that a regular citi- 
zen could run against and defeat a wealthy two-term incumbent. 

"I don't want to run by formula," she says to her family on 
their side porch, in view of the tolling foothills. "Isn't that the 
super sell-out, if you become someone else in order to win?" 

Lauterer, a personable, earnest woman with a gentle twang 
and shoulder-length silver hair, tries to run a clean campaign. 
She ends her plain-talking stump speech by plaintively singing 
"Amazing Grace" while accompanying herself on the dulcimer. 
She believes she's in touch with the people and listens hard 
when she shakes their hands, even while a handler is trying to 
hurry her along. 

Lauterer is smart enough to hire professionals — a seasoned 
campaign manager, a pollster, a media consultant. She's savvy 
enough to attend an Emily's List training session in Washington 
D.C. She spends hours on the phone making cold calls, asking 
strangers for $2,000 contributions. She's a trooper, she's honest, 
she's a known entity, she's a true Washington outsider. 

And she gets creamed. 

LAUTERER'S SAGA WILL DOMINATE ANOTHER 
OF THE HOUR-LONG PROGRAMS in Politics in 

America. It's a complicated story that delves into the tension 
between a politically green candidate and a winnahle campaign. 
It also looks at the decline in the South of the "yellow Ao^ 
Democrats" ("people who would jusl as soon vote lor a yella 
dawg as vote for a Republican," Kolker drawls) and probes into 



March 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 35 



"We're trying not to do cookie-cutter programming, like those series 
with ten hours on sharks or great criminals," says Alvarez. "We're try- 
ing to maintain the dense, layered texture of our one-hour shows." 



why people run for office in the first place. And, in its portrait of 
this folk- singing former journalist, it offers an image of the kind 
of candidate that you don't often find on C-SPAN. 

This outside-the-Beltway perspective is one reason why 
Politics in America has been so warmly embraced by public televi- 
sion. "The grassroots stations like it because it's showing them," 
Alvarez says, recalling the reaction they received after showing a 
10-minute sample reel at the annual PBS programmers' conven- 
tion last June in Chicago. "They can promote this — the folks in 
Philadelphia, the folks in Minneapolis, and so on — because 





ROBERT SUIRE 

A {ttf-NHTrnwrnirmummmm' 




we're shooting in their states." 

Better than promises of carriage, the system gave them 
money — substantial amounts and early on. This experience was 
a first for Alvarez, Kolker, and Stekler, none of whom had previ- 
ously been success ful obtaining funds from PBS or CPB. 

"So imagine our surprise when we walked in there with our 
little six-page treatment that we'd basically made up, and they 
both said, 'It's great! It's just what we want to do,' " says 
Alvarez. 

Luck was on their side. The year was 1993, and PBS was still 
smarting from the meltdown of its "Voters' Channel," an ambi- 
tious Presidential election-year project with the John and Mary 
Markle Foundation based on a commissioned study by veteran 
public television producer Al Perlmutter. Markle ended up with- 
drawing its $5 million, fed up with PBS's unwillingness to com- 
mit more than $3 million and with internal divisions between 
the system and stations that undercut their ability to proceed. In 
the end, Markle's money went to CNN. 

When, shortly after this, the threesome presented the idea of 
Politics in America to PBS and CPB, "We were at the right place 
at the right time. They liked our work," says Alvarez. "So, they 



were willing to give us at least an R&D grant and see what we 
came up with." That $50,000 grant resulted in an 120-page 
treatment, which in turn paved the way for their biggest check 
yet: a $700,000 Challenge grant from PBS and CPB. 

Mary Jane McKinven, Director of News and Public Affairs 
Programming at PBS, says, "This is a team who really loves this 
subject," she says. "They're both irreverent and deeply affection- 
ate about the world of politics. They don't just make fun of it." 
As proof, she cites Louisiana Boys, which she and others at PBS 
saw several years earlier. "Louisiana Boys hit a target right away," 
she says. "We were so happy when it won a 
DuPont Columbia Journalism award" in 1993. 
Based on Louisiana Boys and the clips seen so far, 
McKinven and others in the news division are 
very enthusiastic about Politics in America. "It gets 
behind the scenes and shows what makes politics 
tick," she says. "And it conveys it in a way that 
conventional news coverage doesn't, which is neu- 
tral and solemn." 

After getting a Challenge Grant, additional mon- 
eys started flowing: $400,000 from the Ford 
Foundation; $650,000 from the CIT Group, a 
New Jersey-based financial services company; and 
$250,000 from the John D. and Catherine T 
MacArthur Foundation. With total costs project- 
ed at $2. 3 -million, the producers are in sight of 
their goal. 

With public telvision's financial backing in 
hand, the producers next needed to find a pre- 
senting station — one that helps with promotion, fundraising in 
some cases, and numerous other details necessary to prep a show 
for air. After researching the possibilities and looking especially 
hard at which stations have a track-record raising money for 
comparable series, they honed in on WETA, the Washington, 
D.C., station known for its political programming. The station 
was receptive. "When [WETA president and CEO] Sharon 
Rockefeller came up to talk to us," Stekler recalls, "she under- 
stood exactly what we were doing." WETA quickly became part- 
ners in the production. 

Like McKinven, David McGowan, WETA's senior vice presi- 
dent for news, public affairs and program production, was a fan 
of Louisiana Boys, which he'd seen on PO.V. while an editor at 
Time magazine. Their approach to politics, he says, "is not that 
unusual in print — something that's well written and with 
humor — but you don't often see it on TV." As he's watched bits 
and pieces of the series in the making, McGowan has been 
pleased with how "it goes outside the Senate and Presidential 
politics. It shows how politics infuses every level of life." 

Editorially, the relationship with WETA is one the filmmakers 
are quite happy with. And no wonder; to date, the station has 



36 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



essentially maintained a hands-off approach. 

The producers are not surprised. "We were the ones who orig- 
inated the series, we were the ones who got PBS interested in it, 
we were the ones who won all the awards for Louisiana Boys, 
which this is in the spirit of," Alvarez says. "And everyone real- 
izes that, including WETA. I'm not saying we're like Ken Burns, 
but essentially, it's the independent nature of what we're doing 
that was the whole appeal to begin with." 

McGowan agrees. "It's a kind of film made with a lot of per- 
sonality — and it's not my personality, it's their personality." From 
where he sits, their relationship is like that of editor and writer, 
and "the draft is still being written." 

With a Labor Day due-date, there's enough time for the pro- 
ducers to carve out a colorful, quirky, and carefully crafted work 
"We're trying not to do cookie-cutter programming, like those 
series with ten hours on sharks or great criminals," says Alvarez. 
"We're trying to maintain the dense, layered tex- 
ture of our one -hour shows." 

Ultimately, the fact that Alvarez, Kolker, and 
Stekler have had such success getting public televi- 
sion's support comes down to more than just good 
timing. Alvarez points to several other factors: 
First, there's their substantial body of work, the 
result of two decades as mediamakers. "The first 
ten years were in Louisiana," he notes, "so we were 
not just another filmmaker from New York. It sepa- 
rates you from the pack." 

Second was their success with American Tongues, 
the first show on the first season of P.O.V "It got 
amazingly big numbers — three times as high as 
usual. And it got good reviews and was accessible," 
Alvarez emphasizes, which brings him to this third 
point. 

"All three of us pride ourselves on making acces- 
sible films." This has helped with their video 
rentals, and it most certainly was one of the char- 
acteristics that attracted PBS. 

Fourth, the producers have worked actively on establishing 
relationships with individuals within the public television system 
over the years. By the time they approached PBS and CPB 
about Politics in America, key people knew not only their previ- 
ous videos, but the producers personally. A CPB program (now 
defunct) that brought in independent producers to the annual 
PBS meetings helped them enormously. "We got to mix and 
mingle," says Alvarez, who attended in 1991 and with Stekler in 
1993. "It was a good way to come face-to-face with programmers 
and understand their side of the equation." He adds, "My advice 
to independents is to make these [kinds of] contacts and stay in 
touch." 

Finally, they had a good proposal with a fresh idea. "No one 
had made a film about political culture," says Alvarez. What's 
more, their 120-page proposal laid out the premise of the series, 
its thematic strands, and a production plan in convincing detail. 
"We've pretty much stuck to it," says Stekler with obvious satis- 
faction. 




'UDDY ClANSI, FIVE-TERM 

mayor of Providence, Rhode Island, never 

stops running for reelection. But it's a task this mayor — a chub- 
by, glad-handing, back-slapping kinda guy — seems to live for. As 
one n lpjipPffl per repdHHputs it, "Buddy Ciansi would attend the 
opening of an envelope." 

Ciansi made a full comeback alter a personal scandal put him 
out of office for one term (he allegedly abducted and beat up his 
ex-wife's boyfriend with a fireplace log). We see him now in his 
glory, striding down the street, shaking hand after hand with a 
robust "how're ya?" He dances with giggling geriatric ladies, 
brags to strangers about his 30 pound weight-loss, kisses Petunia 
the pig, and troubleshoots along the way. 

"I want my tree and sidewalk replaced," a man implores. 




"Okay, take care of that: tree and sidewalk," Ciansi com- 
mands, and a young aide with a clipboard steps forward, while 
the mayor briskly moves on. 

"You're not registered?" the mayor asks a teenage girl. Before 
she can do more than shake her head, he snaps his finger and 
another aide steps up. 

But he also has his down moments, which, more often than 
not, occur in full public view. A woman asks about his fiancee; 
he solemnly explains that she's getting married to another man 
that very day in Barbados, a situation he bemoans later with an 
acquaintance dressed in an Uncle Sam costume — a bizarre detail 
that's somehow apt. 

"He was quite the frenetic campaigner," recalls Stekler. "He 
completely forgot he had a mike on, and we hear, among Other 
things, him discussing his personal life, which was so sad we 
could not prevent ourselves from including it- Actually it's rele- 
vant, because he's talking about what it is like to lead a life 
that's as public as it is private, and what th.it Joes to your pri- 
vate lite." 



March 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 37 



23rd 
Athens 

International 

Film & 

Video 

Festival 



Athens 

Intensive 

Media 

Workshops 



April 26 - 
May 3,1 996 



Deadline for 

Entries: 

January 12, 1996 



telephone: 

614-593-1330 

fax: 

614-593-1328 

e-mail: 

rbradIey@ohiou.edu 

write: 

Athens Center 
for Film & Video 
P.O. Box 388 
Athens, OH 
45701 



SO WHERE DID THEY FIND 
THESE CHARACTERS? 

"We called tons of people," Stekler 
says. "The phone bills were outrageous." 
Small wonder, since, unlike campaign 
films from Primary ( 1 960) to The War 



"That's the most frustrating part of it," 
says Alvarez. "It goes against the way we 
work." By now, however, he and the oth- 
ers have learned to deal with their con- 
straints. 

"We can't cover everything. For a while 
you think you can, when you're young 



ill 



irti'i'nllliiH 

n \ 









• 




SI 1 


A 






* 

■' 





VOTE 

TOR 

fiLD. 



FEB.2B 



CITY CLERK 



From the producers' series of plain t 
photographed around the coun 



Room (1993) they were crisscrossing the 
entire country following dozens of cam- 
paigns. 

Two sources were particularly helpful. 
One was Charles Cook, publisher of the 
Cook Political Report, a monthly newsletter 
that profiles and rates every national and 
gubernatorial race. Cook came up with 
Maggie Lauterer, who turned into a major 
strand. Another key source was Michael 
Barone, a senior writer for U.S. News and 
World Report and author of the Almanac of 
American Politics. The producers accompa- 
nied Barone ("the ultimate political 
junkie," according to Alvarez) when he 
visited one of the five (out of 435) con- 
gressional districts that he hadn't see 
before. "He drives around and says, 
'There's a Presbyterian church; there 
must be Germans in the area.' He's got 
this encyclopedic knowledge and is able 
to make all these connections," Alvarez 
gushes. 

In the end, there was never a lack of 
great subjects. The problem was wanting 
to be everywhere at once, and the limited 
time they could spend with each candi- 
date — between one day and three weeks. 



and cocky," he laughs, now 40 and a 
newish father. "You have to just say 
'enough,' choose your stories, and calm 
down." 

Has working on this series affected how 
the producers think about the electoral 



38 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 




process: 

" [When] you look at how the system 
actually works, you can both be amazed 
that people misunderstand how it works 
and appalled by other things they don't 
even know about," Kolker chuckles. He 
leans back in his editing chair and 
muses, "This project has actually opened 
some dimly lit eye I had somewhere. It's 
a lot larger and a lot more complex than 
I had imagined — the process of electing 
people, why people get involved, and 
how it all boils down in different parts of 
the country." 

In the end, he and his partners are 
reassuringly sanguine about the cam- 
paign process today. 

"Our view," says Stekler, "is look at 
grassroots politics. People are out there 
for good reasons — wanting to accom- 
plish something, to serve, be liked, make 
a difference." 

"We want to increase participation of 
the disenfranchised in the system," says 
Alvarez. "We're showing folks from all 
walks of life involved in the system, and 
having a helluva good time." He pauses, 
then confesses, "What we saw, it takes 
the edge off your cynicism." 

Independent editor Patricia Thomson previously cov- 
ered documentaries on the campaigns of Bill Clinton 
(The War Room) and Oliver North (Semper Fi, 
now titled A Perfect Candidate). 



4 File Edit Bin Clip Timeline Output Special Tools Windows 




VID 



AVID 



AVID Av; 

VHS and 3/4" off-line 
editing also available 

947-8433 

(low rates) 

David Royle Productions 
330 West 42nd Street 
New York, NY 10036 



ViuEO? 



LKI I 



Affordable Logging and 

Videotape Editing- 
Automated QuickTime™ 
Movies from your VCR 




Turns your computer into a 

powerful video editing utility. 

Controls consumer, industrial and 

most professional video equipment. 

Supports ViSCA and RS 422 VTRs. 

Infrared control for the record device and 
Head and Tail video Snap-Shots™ with all 
QuickTime™ video boards. Now supports 
Panasonic AC 1 970 & 5700 



VISA 



14 Ross Avenue, Millis, MA 02054 

(500) 376-3712 Fax (508) 376-3714 

Orders Only - (500)263-5553 

America Online/key word-Abbate 






We Want Your Concepts To Become Rem 

A ONE-STOP PRODUCTION CENTER. WE CAN HELP TO KEEP YOU 
WITHIN BUDGET BY KEEPING DOWN UNFORESEEN EXPENSES CAUSED 
BY HAVING A CONFUSION OF CONTRACTORS AND SUPPLIERS. 

• Total equipment availability 

• Seasoned, open-minded staff 

• Flexible pricing packages 

Having lop-line equipment is only as effective as the staff that supports it. Having worked on 
everything from music videos, low-budget features, and commercials to multi-million dollar 
films gives us the ability to support you in creating your project as you require. At Castleway, 
we want your concepts to become a reality. 



100 N. Avondale Road * Avondale Estates, GA * 30002 * 404*508*2135 * FAX 404*508*2139 

lutj)://www*castleway*com 



Castleway Ad forThe Independant 1/3 Sq. 



March 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 39 




by Adam Knee 

When filmmakers Benjamin Brand and 

Jonathan Mednick embarked upon shooting a 
promotional film about a rural Connecticut 
retreat for Harlem children, they soon discovered 
that the communications struggles between the 
campers and their white college -age counselors 
were far more compelling than the expected 
images of inner- city kids enjoying the country. 
With the permission of the camp, campers, and 
counselors, Brand and Mednick went on to shoot 
a documentary about the conflicts at this facility 
arising from age, race, and class differences and 
resultant cultural misunderstandings. Shot on a 
three -chip Hi-8 camcorder with a minimal crew, 
Opposite Camps (16mm & video, 52 min.) cap- 
tures a significant struggle for cultural autonomy 
against a summer backdrop of campfires, swim- 
ming, and arts and crafts. The documentary was 
completed with a $31,500 grant from the Nation- 
al Endowment for the Arts. Opposite Camps, 
Other Pictures Film & Video Prod., 245 E. 11th 
St., #1C, NY, NY 10003; tel/fax: (212) 614-8959. 

A documentary coming from another camp 
altogether is Michelle Handelman's BloodSisters 
(3/4" video, 77 min.), which offers an insider's 
view of the complexity and variety of the San 
Francisco leather dyke subculture. BloodSisters 
mixes experimental and traditional documentary 
techniques to portray the lives of eight diverse 
members of the S/M lesbian community, as well as 
to chronicle important subcultural events and to 
offer discussions of such topics as role playing, 
butch/femme politics, and the limits of consensu- 
ality. The film, which will be having its San 
Francisco theatrical premiere on March 2 1 at the 
Roxie Cinema to coincide with National 
Women's Month, also features images of S/M rit- 
ual and play and soundtrack music by a number of 
local girl punk bands. BloodSisters, M + M 
Productions, Box 170415, San Francisco, CA 
94117; tel. & fax. (510) 245-1709. 

Media work may not be all fun and games, but 
the notion of interactive play on a global scale is 
certainly brought to the fore in artist Shu Lea 
Cheang's multimedia installation Bowling Alley, 




which was presented at Minneapolis's Walker Art 
Center November 1995 to February 1996. For the 
installation, Cheang transforms a gallery into an 
oversized bowling lane with a perpetually rolling 
bowling ball that encounters a video monitor, 
rather than pins. On the monitor, images of falling 
bowling pins are transmitted from a popular local 
bowling-spot-cum-performance-space, and, in 
turn, the sound of falling pins activates moving 
laser disc images created by a group of local 
artists — with whom Cheang has collaborated via 
e-mail. As Cheang explains the project, "The 
bowling lane is a concept for an old communal 
space where locals meet face to face for a night 
out. Stretching the concept, I am trying to con- 
struct a new form of community in cyberspace." 
Bowling Alley, Shu Lea 
Cheang, 225 Lafayette St. 
#812, New York, NY 
10012; tel/fax: (212) 777- 
6912. 

The evolution of funda- 
mental cultural conventions 
is likewise a focus of Jane 
Street (16mm, 100 min.), a 
new independently financ- 
ed feature by Charles Merz- 
bacher. Shot on location in 
Manhattan, jane Street is a comedic look at the 
unusual living and leasing situation of a straight 
man and his two lesbian roommates, who are 
planning to have a baby. Merzbacher, a former 
NYU film teacher, here uses the diversity of New 
York as a context for exploring expanded notions 
of community and family. Jane Street, Altar Rock 
Films, 155 E 29th St., ste. 21A, New York, NY 
10016; (212) 684-3886, fax 679-1522. 

The Los Angeles art world is the backdrop for 
the new narrative work Ultimate Sacrifice 
(video, 24 min.), written and directed by Jack 



Reilly, a Professor of Video/Film at California 
State University, Northridge. Shot entirely on 
location in artists' studios, galleries, and public 
sites, the video evokes the high pressure climate 
of the contemporary art scene through the story 
of an art star trying to evade an assassination 
conspiracy against him. Ultimate Sacrifice, 
Floating Image Productions, 710 Wilshire Blvd., 
ste. 405, Santa Monica, CA 90401; (310) 313- 
6935. 

Inhospitable working environments are also 
the subject of Out At Work: Lesbians and Gay 
Men on the Job (video, 60 min.), now being 
completed by Hunter College faculty members 
Tami Gold and Kelly Anderson. The film 
explores the stories of four gays in the workplace 

who were 
harassed and 
discriminat- 
ed against 
because of 
their sexual 
orientation: 
employees 
fired by a 
"family 
restaurant" 
that consid- 
ered them unsuitable, a harassed auto worker 
whose union ultimately passed a constitutional 
clause to protect gays, and a library worker and a 
female electrician who both won union victories 
related to gender discrimination. Through these 
personal narratives, the film examines concrete 
strategies to gain workplace rights, and it is thus 
intended as a kind of "civil rights training." Gold 
and Anderson were awarded a $19,470 grant 
from the American Film Institute's Independent 
Film and Videomaker Program for completion of 
the documentary. Out At Work, Kelly Anderson, 




40 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



120 E. 4th St. #3E, New York, NY 10003; (212) 
982-7222. 

Experimental media artist Albert Nigrin's 
Mental Radio (video, 1 1 min.) "depicts psychic 
and telepathic interactions between soul mates 
both animal and human," while also visually 
interpreting his experience of a thyroid illness. 
The film, originally shot in super 8, uses editing 
techniques to suggest certain physiological sen- 
sations stemming from the disease, a movement 
between instability and tranquility. Ultimately, 
the work, as Nigrin describes it, "juxtaposes the 
vitality and fragility of the human body with that 
of the earth/nature." The piece was a winner at 
the 1995 American Film Institute National 
Video Festival in Hollywood. Mental Radio, 
Light Pharmacy Films, 55 Louis Street, New 
Brunswick, NJ 08901; (908) 249-9623. Also 
available from Canyon Cinema, (415) 626-2255. 

From the "It's Never Too Late to Start" 
department: Florida writer/producer/director 
Francis Patrick Theriault, a 62-year-old fifth 
grade teacher, first began work in film produc- 
tion in 1990. He has since then self- financed a 
number of video shorts and a 16mm feature 
through his own production company. The film, 
entitled Bound (87 min.), was shot over the 
course of 12 days and concerns intrigue and kid- 
napping in a film production office, of all places. 
It won the award for Best Florida Made Feature 
at the Fort Lauderdale International Film 
Festival. Bound, Pennywise Productions, 1151 
S.W. 109th Lane, Davie, FL 33324; (305) 472- 
8776. 

Other works in and out of production: 

• Massachusetts filmmaker Hilary Weisman 
(Firefly Films, 617/244-1718) is completing 
work on a 16mm short entitled Fresnel's Ether 
Drag. The film, which concerns the relationship 
between a high school senior and a private 
investigator, was funded in part by the 
Massachusetts Cultural Council. 

• Savage Acts: Wars, Fairs and Empire is a 
recently completed documentary about U.S. for- 
eign policy in the Philippines. The 30-minute 
video is available for purchase from the produc- 
er, the American Social History Project 
(212/966-4248). 

• An Orange County "slice of life" is offered 
up in Walking Between the Raindrops, a 75- 
minute video feature debut by Evan Jacobs 
(Anhedenia Films, 714/839-6805). This 
Southern California romance features sound- 
track music by a number of local bands. 

• Robert Jones has recently completed film- 
ing on the feature Hollywood Capri (Wildcat 
Productions, 407/767-0478). Shot on location 
in Los Angeles and Orlando, the film is a come- 
dy about a film professor whose wife threatens to 
leave him for a rock ek roll hand. 




editing 

400S Media Composer 
1 8 gb Storage 




LOW 
RATES 



© m 8861836 




50 W. 34th Street. Suite 9C9, New York. NY 1 0001 





WRITE • DIRECT • SHOOT • EDIT 

YOUR OWN SHORT FILMS IN OUR HANDS-ON INTENSIVE 

EIGHT WEEK WORKSHOPS FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH 

LITTLE OR NO FILMMAKING EXPERIENCE. 



SPECIAL SUMMER SIX WEEK WORKSHOPS AT 

PRINCETON & YALE UNIVERSITIES 
& NEW YORK FILM ACADEMY 



LEARN CONCEPTS OF STORY, DIRECTING, CAMERA, 

LIGHTING, SOUND AND EDITING IN AN 

INTENSIVE YET SUPPORTIVE ENVIRONMENT. 

WORK WITH 16MM ARRIFLEX CAMERAS IN SMALL CLASSES 

DESIGNED AND TAUGHT BY AWARD-WINNING INSTRUCTORS. 



NEW WORKSHOPS START EVERY MONTH IN NEW YORK CITY ALL YEAR ROUND. 



NEW YO«K FILM ACADEMY 

100 EAST 17TH STREET NYC 10003 TEL: 212-674-4300 FAX: 212-477-1414 



March 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 41 




By Kathryn 
Bowser 

LISTINGS DO NOT CONSTITUTE AN ENDORSEMENT. 
SINCE SOME DETAILS MAY CHANGE AFTER THE MAGA- 
ZINE GOES TO PRESS, WE RECOMMEND THAT YOU 
CONTACT THE FESTIVAL DIRECTLY BEFORE SENDING 
PREVIEW CASSETTES. DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTING A 
CALL FOR ENTRIES IN THE FESTIVAL COLUMN IS THE 
1ST OF THE MONTH TWO MONTHS PRIOR TO COVER 
DATE (E.G., JAN. 1 FOR MARCH ISSUE). ALL BLURBS 
SHOULD INCLUDE: FESTIVAL DATES, CATEGORIES, 
PRIZES, ENTRY FEES, DEADLINES, FORMATS & CON- 
TACT INFO. TO IMPROVE OUR RELIABILITY AND MAKE 
THIS COLUMN MORE BENEFICIAL, WE ENCOURAGE 
ALL MEDIAMAKERS TO CONTACT FIVF WITH CHANGES, 
CRITICISM, OR PRAISE FOR FESTIVALS PROFILED. 



Domestic 

ACCESS AWARDS, July 5-7, CA. 2nd annual edi- 
tion of fest accepts cable access works in the follow- 
ing cats: children's program, educational/doc, elec- 
tion coverage, entertainment, environmental, 
health-related, local origination, minority issues, 
news coverage, political debate, religious, senior 
issues, sports coverage, student project, women's 
issues &. controversial subject. Winners receive gold- 
plated award; finalists & honorable mentions get cer- 
tificates. Montage nonlinear software awarded to 
one access facility by random drawing. Awards are 
for access facilities &. people who are or have been 
submitting mat'ls to such. Entries may have originat- 
ed on film or video but must be submitted on VHS. 
Entry fee: $30. Deadline: March 21 (late deadline 
March 28; add $5). Festival of Independent 
Producers & Access Awards ceremony held in San 
Diego. Contact: Access Awards, c/o Ron Hebert, 
competition coordinator, 9525 Mission Gorge Rd., 
#78, Santee, CA 92071; (800) 411-4331. 

ADAM BARAN HONOLULU GAY AND LES- 
BIAN FILM FESTIVAL, June 9-15, HI. Doc, fic- 
tion, animation & experimental prods about les- 
bians, gays, transgenders & bisexuals accepted; all 
genres & lengths. Fest operates under auspices of 
LIFE Foundation & the AIDS Foundation of Oahu 
& donates net proceeds to them. Formats: 35mm, 
16mm, 3/4", 1/2"; preview on 1/2" only. Deadline: 
May 1. Contact: Adam Baran, Honolulu Gay & 
Lesbian Film Fest, 1877 Kalakaua Ave., Honolulu, 
HI 96815; (808) 941-0424; fax: (808) 943-1724. 



CHICAGO UNDERGROUND FILM FESTI- 
VAL, August 14-18, Chicago, IL. 3rd annual com- 
petitive fest, organized to encourage low-budget 
film/videomakers & provide venue for underground, 
ind. & experimental works; inch works outside 
entertainment mainstream, controversial, cutting 
edge, transgressive, politically incorrect & beyond. 
Both first-time directors & pros welcome. Entries 
must be produced for $ IK or less per minute "in the 
can" budget. Prizes: best feature, short, experimental, 
doc. Entry fee: $25 shorts under 60 min.; $35 fea- 
tures. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, super 8, super VHS, 
VHS, Beta, 3/4", Hi8, Pixelvision, interactive. 
Preview on 1/2" only. Deadline: April 15. Chicago 
Underground Film Fest, 2501 N. Lincoln Ave., 
#278, Chicago, IL 60614; (312) 866-8660; fax: 489- 
3468; clark@interaccess.com. 

INTERCOM INDUSTRIAL FILM AND VIDEO 
FESTIVAL, August, IL. Oldest int'l industrial film 
& video fest in US; now in 31st yr. Industrial, spon- 
sored &. educational prods eligible. Aim is "to show- 
case enormous technical & creative energy behind 
sponsored prods & to highlight importance of media 
arts in business communications." Cats incl. dental 
science, doc, drug abuse, educational, environment/ 
ecology, fashion/music video, fundraising, human 
relations, medicine, personal counseling, public rela- 
tions, public service & information, religion, 
research, safety, sales/marketing, sports/recreation, 
training, travel/transportation & video news release. 
Special achievement awards to acting, cinematogra- 
phy/videography, computer graphics/animation, dir- 
ecting, editing, graphics, humor, music, special 
effects & writing. Awards incl. Gold &. Silver Hugos 
to top prods in each cat. Gold & Silver Plaques may 
also be awarded in each competitive cat. Entries 
must be produced betw Apr 1 of the preceding year 
& date of entry. Formats accepted: 35mm, 16mm, 
3/4", 1/2". Entry fee: $100-$120. Deadline: late Apr. 
Contact: Fest Director, Intercom Industrial Film and 
Video Festival, Cinema/Chicago, 415 N. Dearborn 
Street, Chicago, IL 60610; (312) 644-3400; fax: 
(312) 644-0784. 

JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL, July, CA. Established in 
1980, noncompetitive fest (under annual theme 
Independent Filmmakers: Looking at Ourselves) 
showcases new ind. American Jewish-subject cinema 
& diverse selection of foreign films. Fest presents 
dramatic, doc, experimental & animated shorts & 
features about Jewish history, culture & identity. 
Filmmakers need not be Jewish; films selected by 
subject. Special programs vary from yr to yr & have 
incl Russian, Sephardic & Latino programs. 30-35 
films showcased each yr. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 
3/4", 1/2". Deadline: Late March. Contact: Janis 
Plotkin, director, or Caroline Libresco, associate 
director, Jewish Film Festival, 2600 Tenth Street, 
#102, Berkeley, CA 94710; (510) 548-0556; fax: 
(510) 548-0536; Jewishfilm@aol.com. 

JEWISH VIDEO COMPETITION, June, CA. 
Now in 3rd yr., competition accepts entries from 
every level & cat of prod. Entries must have origi- 
nated on video or computer only, been submitted on 
VHS-NTSC, been produced w/in preceding 3 1/2 yrs 
& be up to 100 min. Awards: Jurors Choice (share 
$750); Jurors Citation (share $500), Directors 
Choice (share $250); Honorable Mention (certifi- 
cate & screenings); Lindheim Award for program 



that best explores political & social relationships 
between Jews & other ethnicities & religions. All 
winners screened at special awards presentation at 
the Magnes Museum for 2 mos & other venues to 
be announced. Formats: 1/2"; exhibition on 3/4", 
Betacam. Entry fee: $25 under 30 min., $35 over 31 
min. Deadline: Mar. 31. Contact: Bill Chayes, video 
competition coordinator, Judah L. Magnes 
Museum, 2911 Russell St., Berkeley, CA 94705; 
(510) 549-6952; fax: (510) 849-3673; wchayes 
@aol.com. 

MARIN COUNTY NATIONAL FESTIVAL OF 
SHORT FILMS, July 3-7, CA. Competitive fest 
accepts 16mm film under 30 min. Up to $1000 
awarded in cats of student, ind. & animated. Films 
screened during Marin County Fair. Format: 16mm; 
preview on VHS only. Entry fee: $15. Deadline: 
March 22. Contact: Marin County Fair & Expo- 
sition, Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael, CA 94903; 
(415) 499-6400. 

MINNESOTA FILM AND VIDEO EXPO, June 
14-16, MN. Competitive fest seeks "innovative & 
entertaining independent prods." Film forums & 
seminars follow selected prods. All genres accepted. 
Formats: 70mm, 35mm, 16mm, 8mm, video. Entry 
fee; $10; free to AIVF & IFP members. Deadline: 
Apr. 19. Contact: Robert Blair, Minnesota Film & 
Video Expo, WHAM Enterprises, Inc., 1769 
Reaney Ave., St. Paul, MN 55106; (612) 774-3475. 

MOUNTAINFILM FESTIVAL OF MOUN- 
TAIN FILMS, May, CO. One of country's foremost 
fests of mountain, environmental & adventure films 
& videos, held each yr in Telluride. Any film or 
video made w/in last 10 years that deals with themes 
of mountains or mountaineering, adventure, alpine 
peoples, environment or exploration & interpreta- 
tion of wild places eligible. Children's program for 
films & videos with similar themes. Awards: Grand 
Prize for Best Film of Fest ($1,000), Best 
Mountaineering Film, Best Adventure Spirit Film, 
Best Environmental Film & Children's Film 
Awards. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4", 1/2". Entry 
fee: $10. Deadline: Early April. Contact: Dick 
Silverman, director, Mountainfilm Festival of 
Mountain Films, Box 1088, 308 N. Willow, 
Telluride, CO 81435; (970) 728-4123; fax: (970) 
728-6458. 

NEWARK BLACK FILM FESTIVAL, July, NJ. 6 
wk summer fest of films by African-American film- 
makers & films featuring history & culture of Black 
people in America & elsewhere. Over 21 yrs of fest, 
nearly 500 films have been viewed by total audience 
of almost 85,000. Paul Robeson Awards are bienni- 
al competition. Accepted are noncommercial, ind. 
films & videos completed in previous 2 yrs in cats of 
doc, non-doc, animation & experimental. Original 
16mm films &. videos released w/in previous 2 yrs 
considered; industrial, commercial or studio prods 
ineligible. Committee representing sponsors & com- 
munity arranges fest & selects films. Cash prizes 
awarded at discretion of judges. Fest is free to pub- 
lic & co-sponsored by Newark Museum, Newark 
Public Library, Newark Symphony Hall, New Jersey 
Institute of Technology &. Rutgers University/ 
Newark. Entry fee: $25 (Robeson competition). 
Deadline: Early April. Contact: Program Coor- 
dinator, Newark Black Film Festival, Newark 
Museum, 49 Washington Street, Box 540, Newark, 



42 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



NJ 07101-0540; (201) 596-6550; fax: (201) 642- 
0459. 

NIGHT OF THE BLACK INDEPENDENTS 
SPRING FILM AND VIDEO FESTIVAL, May, 
GA. Founded in 1992, fest is held on weekend in 
May & incl daily screenings & reception for partic- 
ipating filmmakers & press. Fest showcases about 
20-25 works by African-American filmmakers. 
Entries must have been completed w/ in previous 3 
yrs. Formats: 1/2". Entry fee: $20. Deadline: mid 
April. Contact: Peggy Hayes, founder, Night of the 
Black Independents, 830 Eastwood, Ave, Suite B, 
Atlanta, GA 30316-2414; (404) 627-9900. 

ONION CITY FILM FESTIVAL, May 3-5, IL. 
Sponsored by Experimental Film Coalition, fest is 
"committed to excellence in exhibition of all vital 
forms of experimental film." Entries must have 
been completed after March 1, 1994- All genres of 
experimental film accepted. Entry fee: $25 mem- 
bers/students; $30 nonmembers. Formats: 35mm, 
16mm, S-8. Deadline: Apr. 1. Contact: Johnny 
White, director, Onion City Film Festival, 1467 S. 
Michigan Ave., 3rd fl. front, Chicago, IL 60605- 
2810; (312) 986-1823; fax: (312) 384-5532. 

OUTFEST: LOS ANGELES GAY AND LES- 
BIAN FILM AND VIDEO FESTIVAL, July, CA. 
Films 6k videos by &/or about lesbians, gays, bisex- 
uals & transgenders eligible for fest, sponsored by 
Out on the Screen (formerly Gay ck Lesbian Media 
Coalition). Features, shorts, docs, experimental & 
animations accepted. Out on the Screen also spon- 
sors other programs, including mini-festivals each 
fall 6k spring, a monthly film 6k video series in col- 
laboration with the Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian 
Community Services Center 6k a partnership with 
West Hollywood Public Access for a semi-monthly 
cable program. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4", 1/2". 
Entry fee: $10-$20 depending upon length. 
Deadline: Early Apr. Contact: Morgan Rumpf, 
exec, director, Outfest: Los Angeles Gay and 
Lesbian Film and Video Festival, Out on the 
Screen, 8455 Beverly Blvd., Suite 309, Los Angeles, 
CA 90048; (213) 951-1247; fax: (213)951-0721. 

PHILAFILM/PHILADELPHIA INTERNA- 
TIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, July, PA. Founded in 
1978, this fest is annual, int'l competition & mar- 
ketplace for ind. film 6k vidcomakers. Each yr fest is 
thematically programmed, based upon dominant 6k 
current social issues such as TV violence, regional 
wars &. conflicts or artistic features such as tributes. 
Premieres categorized by int'l, nat'l or local 6k invit- 
ed as such. Cats incl. feature, short, animation, 
experimental, S-8, music video 6k student. Awards: 
Leigh Whipper Award for Best in Category (Gold, 
Silver, Honorable Mention). FeSI administered by 
Int'l Association of Motion Picture 6k Television 
Producers 6* sponsored by City of Philadelphia & 
corporate sponsors. Formats: )5mm, 16mm, 3/4", 
1/2", S-8, 8mm. Entry fee: $20-$100. Headline: Mid 
April. Contact: Charles B. Greene, general manag- 
er, Philafilm/Philadelphia International Film 
Festival, International Association ot Motion 
Picture 6k TV Producers, 262 5 Sorrento Drive, 
Suite A, Philadelphia, PA 19131; (215) 545- 
4862/879-8209; fax: (215) 844-8004. 



sw 



tier 



up? 



the 



1996 TAOS TALKING PICTURE FESTIVAL 

An International Rendezvous celebrating the moving image and exploring 

the power of the media. 

Tributes, retrospectives and the very best in new 
independent films. Panel discussions and Workshops . 



r 1 i 11 



.l**.jl 4*^ • -■ 

estiva! 



21 6M North Pueblo Rd. #216 Taos, NM 87571 

T 505.751 .0637 F 505.751 .7385 

email: taosfilm@laplaza.taos.nm.us 



^NEW ^MEXICO 



1996 Call For Entries 




LONG ISLAND 
FILM FESTIVAL 

13th Annual Film/Video Festival 

June 7-11, 1996 

Call or Write for Entry Forms (Due 4/15/96): 

Long Island Film Festival 

c/o PO Box 498 

Huntington, NY 11743 

1 800 423-7611 

from 10-6, Mon-Fri 



The Long Island Film Festival is co-produced by The Long Island Film & 
TV Foundation and the Cinema Aits Centre in association with the Suffolk 
County Motion Picture and Television Commission. It is sponsored in part 
by the Suffolk County Department of Economic Development. 



March 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 43 



RENTAL 212.463.7830 




BEBEBBEHBBEMBBB 
41 Union square west suite 1228 NYC 10011 



Krasnogorsk-3 16mm! 



Available in Super 16mm 

i|^|t|i|il^tl^|^SH| Standard 



Motorized! 

Crystal Sync Version 




Standard 

„ > ir-TiiiTiii ™^ Wind-up Version 

ust$l,199!j„ s t$499! 



'Sophisticated optics, solid 
construction" - New York Times 
'A steal at twice the money" 

- Jack Watson Moviemaker Magaz- 

The crystal sync K-3 camera comes with 
the standard set of accessories (see 
description at right) and 17-69mm lens. 
Thecamera will runat12,24,48fps at sync 
and with the addition of an Aaton style 
speed crystal control all speeds between 
6 and 60fps are possible. With the addition 
of the sync motor the K-3 is the ideal 
camera for music videos, second unit, or 
stunt camera work, at less than the cost of 
a traditional crystal sync motor alone. 
Motor made in USA. 

Tel 212 




SEES 



Motion 
Picture 
Equipment 



Fax 212 



All cameras come with a complete set of 
accessories including 1 7-69mmzoom lens, 
pistol grip, shoulder brace, five glass filters 
(ND,UV,Lightand Dark Yellow, #2 Diopter), 
cable release, case, warranty, and more! 
The camera utilizes a rotating mirror reflex 
finder, and an operating range from 8- 
50fps with single frame. Made of solid 
aluminum construction and coated optics. 
Find out for yourself why the K-3 is the 
most popular camera in America. Call 
today for a free brochure. 

■219-8408 106 Franklin St. #2 

■219-8953 New York, NY 10013 



Full Production, Post-Production, and Creative Services 



-Directors, Writers, DPs, and Editors Available-* 

Specializing in cost-saving options, best rates in NYC 



Production: 

•Cut-rate Hi8, BetaS/* packages 
•Professional Crews 
•Casting/Loc. scouting 




Post-Production: 
• Toaster 4000 A/B Roll 
•Hi8, 3/4"SP, BetaS/> 
•CG, TBCs, the worki 
•Affordable 3D animation 



•Studios Video Production 

WE OFFER TRAINING! 

~Low project rates available-Call for consultation today- 



(200 Broadway, Stc. 2B, NY, NY 10001 212-889-1601-rax-212-889-1602 



44 THE INDEPENDENT March 1996 



Foreign 

CANNES INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTI- 
VAL, May 9-20, France. The Independent Feature 
Project is working with Cannes to select fiction fea- 
tures for the Directors' Fortnight (Quinzaine des 
Realisateurs). For the 7th consecutive yr, the IFP is 
serving as the official US rep for the Directors' 
Fortnight. It facilitates preview screenings in NY in 
early March. For information on submitting fea- 
tures, contact: Mary Davies, Market Director, IFP, 
104 W. 29th St., New York, NY 10001-5310; (212) 
465-8200; fax: (212) 465-8525. For info on the 
Cannes Film Festival, please see the Jan./Feb.issue 
of The Independent. 

EUROPEAN MEDIA ART FESTIVAL, Sept., 
Germany. Over 140 experimental films & videos, 
as well as computer 6k video installations, CD- 
ROM, text contributions & Internet projects show- 
cased at this fest, one of largest annual events for 
innovative & experimental works in those fields. 
Open to "experiments, to the extraordinary, to all 
those working methods which, using the most 
diverse media, create intelligent, radical or ironic 
worlds of symbols 6k signs in today's digital age." 
All films 6k video works must have been completed 
w/in previous yr. Awards go to best German exper- 
imental film or video prod. Starting this yr there 
will be additional best of cat media awards. In spe- 
cial programs, current political, societal 6k artistic 
topics explored. An int'l student forum, retros, 
workshops 6k open air events are also held. Appl. 
for installations, expanded media 6k exhibition pro- 
jects should enclose detailed calculation of costs, 
precise description, photo material 6k video docu- 
mentation if possible. Site for installations is art 
gallery Dominikanerkirche. Selected films/videos 
compensated w/ DM4/minute with a minimum of 
DM40 6k maximum DM160. Deadline: Late April. 
Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4", 1/2", S-8, Beta, 8mm, 
installations, Internet, CD-ROM. Entry fee: None. 
Contact: Alfred Rotert, director, European Media 
Art Festival, EO. Box 1861, Hasestrasse 71, D- 
49008 Osnabriick, Germany; tel. 011 49 541 
21658; fax: 28327; emaf@bionic.zer. de. 

HIROSHIMA INTERNATIONAL ANIMA- 
TION FESTIVAL, Aug. 22-26, Japan. Fest, now 
in its 6th edition, accepts animated "frame by 
frame" works including computer graphics anima- 
tion. Awards: Grand Prize (¥1,000,000), 
Hiroshima Prize (¥1,000,000), Debut Prize 
(¥500,000), Special Int'l Jury Prize (s); Prize (s) for 
Outstanding Work. Entries should be under 30 
min., completed after Apr. 1, 1994. Formats: 
35mm, 16mm, video. Deadline: Mar. 21. Contact: 
Sayoko Kinoshita, director, Hiroshima Inter- 
national Animation Festival, 4-17, Kakb-machi, 
Naka-ku, Hiroshima 730, Japan, tel: 01 1 81 82 245 
0245; fax: 011 81 82 245 0246. 

HUESCA INTERNATIONAL SHORT FILM 
FESTIVAL, June, Spain. Founded in 1971, com- 
petitive showcase for Spanish 6k foreign short film 
has aim of "the diffusion of image as a contribution 
to the better knowledge 6k fraternity among the 
nations of the world." Awards: Golden Danzante 
(500,000 ptas.); Silver Danzante to Best Film with 
Plot; Silver Danzante to Best Animated Film; 
Silver Danzante to Best Documentary; Bronze 



Danzante. No thematic restrictions except no films 
dealing with tourism or publicity. Of approx. 400 
entries received each year, about 170 shown. 
Deadline: Early April. Formats: 35mm, 16mm. 
Entry fee: None. Contact: Jose Maria Escriche, 
comite de direccion, Festival International Corto- 
metraje "Ciudad de Huesca" C/Parque, 1, 29 
(Circulo Oscense), 22002 Huesca, Spain; tel: 011 
34 74 21 25 82; fax: 01 1 34 74 21 00 65. 

MIDNIGHT SUN FILM FESTIVAL, June, 
Finland. Founded in 1986 by Finnish filmmakers, 
this noncompetitive fest is held in Sodankyla, a 
small village of 3,000 people about 100 miles above 
the Arctic Circle, at the beginning of the Lappish 
summer, when the sun is out 24 hrs /day. Fest loose- 
ly divided into 3 sections: works of some of the 
"greatest directors of all time," new cinema & silent 
movies w/ live music. Films screened in 3 venues 
day 6k night. Fest specialties include nightly 3-D 
screenings in a circus tent, new Finnish films & fest 
trains, which take audience on a 2-day trip through 
Finland accompanied by moving cinema 6k live 
music. About 40 or 50 films shown each edition. 
Deadline: Mid April. Formats: 35mm, 16mm. Entry 
fee: None. Contact: Fest director, Midnight Sun 
Film Festival, Jaamerentie 9, 99600 Sodankyla, 
Finland; tel: 011 358 693 614 523. 

MONTREAL INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL 
OF NEW CINEMA AND VIDEO, June, 
Canada. Founded in 1971, an important noncom- 
petitive showcase for innovative, ind. features 6k 
shorts of all genres from over 25 countries. Known 
as an int'l meeting place for new cinema, video 6k 
new audiovisual technology, provides meeting 
atmosphere 6k extensive promotion for films 6k 
videos screened. Entries must have been produced 
after Jan. 1 of preceding yr 6k not previously shown 
in Quebec. While fest is not competitive, it offers 
awards, sponsored by Laurentian Bank, for Best 
Discovery in feature ($3,000), medium length/short 
film ($1,000) 6k Public's Choice ($1,000) cats and 
doc discovery ($2,000) of fest, offered indepen- 
dently by National Film Board of Canada. Fest also 
sponsors film 6k video market, w/ free screenings to 
encourage marketing, sales 6k distribution. 
Deadline: Mid April. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4", 
1/2", S-8, Beta, 8mm, installations. Entry fee: 
$50Cdn. Contact: Claude Chamberlan, director, 
Festival International Ju Nouveau Cinema et de la 
Video de Montreal, 3726 Boulevard St. Laurent, 
Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2X 2V8; tel: (514) 
843-4725; fax: (514)843-4631. 

PARNU VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY FILM 
FESTIVAL, July, Estonia. Fest enters 10th yr in 
1996 as scientific & artistic event aimed at sup- 
porting cultural survival 6k presenting tilms 6k 
videos which record human cultures in social, his- 
torical or ecological context. Fest does not accept 
staged, propaganda or tourist tilms or films "which 
are against human values or encourage hatred 6k 
discrimination between races, neighbors & 
nations." Competition entries may not exceed 60 
min.; tilms 60-100 min. may be accepted tor special 
reasons. No restrictions on awards, yr of production 
or dates of lirst screenings, best ret. tins preview cas- 
settes tor library. Awards: Grand Prize (large 
Estonian h.uidwovcn blanket); prize tor best film on 
sur\ iv. il dt indigenous culture; prize for outstanding 




407.839.6045 

vn ires & shor s narrative • Documentary • animation • Experimentai* Music Video 



J 




The Outpost 

Edit on our Media 100 system for just $50 
per hour. That ineludes an operator, various 
tape ibmiats including Beta SP, Macintosh 
and Arnica £$raphics, and the Video Toaster. 

718 -"533 - 2385 



SI Brooklyn NY 



March 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 45 



BETA SP COMPONENT ON-LINE 



♦ ADO/Chyron Superscribe (optional) 

♦ Hi-8 Transfers 

♦ Duplication From All Formats 
Special Night Rates 



AVID 



On-Line 

♦ AVR27 - Component, in & out 

♦ 3D Real Time Effects 

Off-Line 

♦ MC-800 w/4 ch. Audio Playback 

Editor Training Available — Mac Graphics 

# Great Support # 



on track video 

1 04 W. 29th St., 12th Floor (212)645-2040 



Micro-Finder! 



The Ultra Compact Director's Viewfinder 

Just $299.00! 

Special introductory offer. 




* ^«5HH^t#«* 



Specifications: 
Range mm: 

35mm 



8.5 to 47mm 
18 to 100mm 



Anamorphic 36 to 200mm 




2/3" Video 
1 " Video 



7.3 to 40mm 
10 to 58mm 



MKA is proud to introduce the first affordable high 
quality director's finder, the Micro Finder. The Micro 
Finder features solid aluminum construction, coated 
glass optics, and compact design. Unlike most directors 
finders which are large and bulky the Micro Finder can 
be worn all day without neck strain. The Micro Find] 
offers the most commonly used focal lengths for bo 
16mm, 35mm, 35mm anamorphic, and video use in a 1 
variety of aspect ratios - 1.33, 1.66, 1.85,2.35. Each 
finder comes with four drop in masks, strap, padded 
carry case, and six month warranty. 

Tel 212-219-8408 
Fax 212-219-8953 




PES 



Motion 
Picture 
Equipment 



106 Franklin St. #2 
New York, NY 10013 



Dia 



FILM SOUND 



sound design, editing, and SFX 
Foley, ADR, and voice-over 
recording 



original music and scoring 
library music selection 
and licensing 



competitive rates 



Dig TT, 



m.W4Ml 



4 NYC 



scientific docs, audience prize; other prizes to stim- 
ulate Nordic, native & young filmmakers. All prizes 
Finno-Ugric authentic handicrafts. Special prize in 
honor of Andris Slapinsh, Latvian anthropologist 
& filmmaker killed while making a film in Riga, 
awarded annually to the best native filmmaker w/ 
film or video about indigenous or vanishing cul- 
tures; provides cash scholarship or professional 
equipment as well as fest expenses. Special pro- 
grams inch survival problems of indigenous cultures 
6k shamanism. $300 fee for optional attendance 
covers hotel, meals, conferences, screenings, excur- 
sion to one Estonian island, etc. Deadline: Early 
April. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4", 1/2", Beta. 
Entry fee: None. Contact: Mark Soosaar, curator, 
Parnu Visual Anthropology Film Festival, Box A, 

10 Esplanaadi Street, EE3600 Parnu, Estonia; tel: 

01 1 372 44 43869; fax: 01 1 372 26 01247. 

PESARO INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF 

NEW CINEMA, June, Italy. Founded in 1965, 
noncompetitive fest is showcase for films by young 
directors 6k/or ind. works 6k/or works coming from 
countries new to film prods. Since late '70s, fest 
devoted to nat'l film prods (Arab countries, China, 
Spain, Japan, Latin America, India, Soviet Union, 
East Europe, Far East Asia, Iran, American ind., 
South Korea, etc.). Ann'l special event dedicated 
to Italian film director or film genre. Entries must 
be Italian premieres. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4", 
1/2", Beta. Entry fee: None. Contact: Adriano 
Apra, director, Mostra International del Nuovo 
Cinema, Via Villafranca, 20, 00185 Rome, Italy; 
tel: 01 1 39 6 491 156; fax: 01 1 39 6 491 163. 

PRAGUE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTI- 
VAL, "GOLDEN GOLEM," June, Czech 
Republic. This FIAPF-accredited fest was created 
in 1995 "to help publicize film works in light of the 
changing face of Europe & the entire world," with 
emphasis "on harmonizing the interests of film cre- 
ators, producers & film viewers." Program: int'l 
competition for features, segment for premieres of 
features, non-competitive screenings & market. 
Entries must be features on 70mm or 35mm, not 
presented in other int'l competitions or film fests 6k 
produced w/in yr preceding fest. Awards: Grand 
Prix (Golden Golem), Special Jury Prize 6k awards 
for Best Director, Best Performance by 
Actor/Actress. Deadline: Mid April. Formats: 
70mm, 35mm, 16mm; preview on VHS. Entry fee: 
None. Contact: Antonin Moskalyk, director, 
Mezinarodnifilmovyfestival Praha Zlaty Golem, 
Golden Golem Foundation, Dlouha 16, 11000 
Prague, Czech Republic; tel: 011 42 2 232 20 68; 
fax: 011 42 2 232 79 83. 

ST. PETERSBURG INTERNATIONAL FILM 
FESTIVAL, "MESSAGE TO MAN," June 14-20, 
Russia. FIAPF-recognized fest accepts feature doc 
(up to 120 min.), short doc (up to 40 min.), short 
fiction (up to 60 min.) 6k animated films (up to 60 
min.). Program incl int'l competition, best debut 
int'l competition 6k special programs. Entries must 
have been completed after Jan. 1, 1995. Cash prizes 
of $2,000-$5,000 awarded. In 1995, a total of 112 
films from 24 countries were screened, w/ 75 par- 
ticipating in 2 competitive programs. 950 partici- 
pants from 32 countries accredited, incl. 89 jour- 
nalists from 9 countries. Fest provides room 6k 2 
meals/day. Films screened in main competition hall 



46 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



& St. Petersburg art houses. Formats: 35mm, 
16mm; preview on 1/2" VHS. Entry fee: $35 (incl 
shipping costs; feature-length films may incur more 
shipping costs). Deadline: Apr. 15. Contact: U.S. 
coordinator Anne Borin, St. Petersburg Film 
Festival, c/o Marie Nesthus, Donnell Media 
Center, 20 W. 53rd St., NY, NY 10019; (212) 362- 
3412. Fest address: St. Petersburg International 
Film Festival "Message to Man," 12 Karavannaya, 
191011, St. Petersburg, Russia; tel: Oil 7 812 235 
2660/230 2200; fax: 011 7 812 235 3995. 

SOCHI INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL- 
KINOTAVR, June, Russia. An int'l competitive 
event, founded in 1993, fast becoming major 
Russian fest. Immediately after the Cannes Film 
Festival, it "provides a rare opportunity for foreign- 
ers to get acquainted practically with the entire 
Russian cinema prod of the past year." About 15 
features shown in int'l &. nat'l competitions &. 
about 40 in information 6k retro sections. Fest uses 
reps in different countries & takes recommenda- 
tions from int'l film programmers. Invitational, w/ 
limited number of prods invited from each country. 
Deadline: Early April. Formats: 35mm. Entry fee: 
None. Contact: Valentina Mikhaleva, program 
director/Mark Rudinshtein, general producer, 
Mezhdunarodny Kino Festival v Sochi, 35 Arbat 
Street, Moscow 121835, Russia; tel: 011 7 095 241 
0772; fax: 011 7 095 248 0966. 

SUNNY SIDE OF THE DOC-MARSEILLES 
INTERNATIONAL DOCUMENTARY FILM 
MARKET, June, France. Int'l market for profes- 
sionals in docs is meeting place for producers, dis- 
tributors, television buyers, et al. to discuss co- 
prods, sales & program acquisitions. "American 
Corner" is umbrella booth w/ preferential rates to 
draw in American buyers. In 1994, reps from Arts 
6k Entertainment, HBO, National Geographic, 
PBS, WNET, Center for New American Media 6k 
Voyager Co. attended. Now also open to multime- 
dia knowledge products. Video library incl screen- 
ing booths, facilities for producers who do not wish 
to rent a stand 6k technical industries section. 
Symposia 6k informal meetings. Vue sur les Docs, 
int'l doc fest held during the same period of market, 
attracts 20,000 spectators 6k awards 5 prizes. 
Deadline: Early April. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4". 
Entry fee: varies. Contact: Olivier Masson, manag- 
ing dir., Marche International du Documentaire, 3, 
Square Stalingrad, 13001 Marseilles, France; tel: 
011 33 91 08 43 15; fax: 011 33 91 84 38 34. 

WELLINGTON FILM FESTIVAL, July, New 
Zealand. Noncompetitive fest, now in its 25th year, 
presented by New Zealand Federation of Film 
Societies 6k the Wellington Film Society. Fest 
developed to encourage screening of new films that 
might not otherwise come to New Zealand. 
Selections must be features or shorts not previously 
screened there. About 100 invited features 6k 
almost as many shorts showcased each yr. Fest is sis- 
ter to Auckland Film Festival, which presents same 
program about a wk later. Highlights of both select- 
ed tor traveling test in S. Island cities Christchurch 
&. Dunedin. Deadline: Late April. Formats: 35mm, 
[6mm, 3/4", 1/2", Beta. Entry fee: None. Contact: 
Bill Gosden, director, Wellington Film Festival, Box 
9544, Te Aro, Wellington, New Zealand; tel: 011 
64 4 850 162; lax: 01 1 64 4 801 7304. 




AVID EDITING 

WORKSHOP 



TWO DAY SUPER INTENSIVE 

NON-LINEAR EDITING 

WORKSHOP 

Use AVID FILM COMPOSER, the most 
advanced offline AVID editing system. Learn to 
digitize, edit, and output negative cut lists, 
change lists, and optical lists for film and EDLs 
for video. Classes available days, evenings, and 
weekends. Tuition $700. 



NEW 



YORK 



FILM 



ACADEMY 



100 EAST 17TH STREET NYC 10003 TEL: 212-674-4300 FAX: 212-477-1414 



JURAS GRAPHICS 

What do you want in an animation? 
You want it to look good and believable. 

We don't just simulate it. We ma^e reaCiiy. 
If you think it should be believable too, give us a call. We 
have the expertise and equipment like the big labs do. 

Call (708) 265-8811 



March 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 47 




please take note of new ad policy: classified 
ads of up to 240 characters (including spaces 
& punctuation) cost $25/issue for aivf mem- 
bers, $35 for nonmembers; ads of 240 to 480 
characters cost $45/issue for aivf members, 
$65 for nonmembers. please include valid 
member id# when submitting ads. ads exceed- 
ing requested length will be edited. all 
advertising copy should be typed double- 
spaced and accompanied by a check or money 
order payable to: fivf, 304 hudson st., ny, ny 
10013. to pay by credit card, you must include: 
credit card type (visa/mc); card number; name 
on card; expiration date; billing address & 
cardholder's daytime phone. ads received 
without all information will be discarded, 
advertisers wishing to run a classified more 
than once must pay for each insertion and 
indicate number of insertions on submitted 
copy. deadlines are the 1st of each month, two 
months prior to cover date (e.g. april 1st for 
the june issue). 

Buy • Rent • Sell 

9 616 AVID DRIVES DIRT CHEAP. For rent as 
low as $225/week. (212) 406-0180. 

AVID MEDIA COMPOSER 400S. Quadra 950, 
40 meg ram, 13.5 gig storage, CD audio, latest soft- 
ware, $22,000. (415) 331-7345. 

AVID R-MAGS, removable magnetic drives, vari- 
ous sizes, for sale or rent. Great prices. Contact Ron 
(212) 219-0020. 

COMPLETE 16MM FILM PRODUCTION 
PKG.: Local (Atlanta) weekend rentals only. 
$250/day. Sync camera (Eclaire NPR), sound & light 
pkg. Price also includes 1-4 PAs. Cliff Lyttle, Mecca 
Motion Pictures, Atlanta, GA; (404) 808-7139. 

FILM T-SHIRT & WALL CLOCK. Original 
design shirt w/ "Film is Reel." A must for your 
wardrobe. Also film reel analog wall clock. Tell time 
in your style. For free brochure, send SASE to Film 
Shirt/Reel Clock, Box 525, Sarasota, FL 34230-0525. 

FOOTAGE WANTED. Looking for dangerous 
events, rescue & survival footage, live action mater- 
ial only, for European broadcast. Fax info to "Ultimo 
Minuto" (212) 247-6144. 

FOR RENT: Betacam quality on Hi8. New 700 lines 
resolution Sony DXC327A broadcast pkg, incl. tri- 
pod, monitor lights, mikes, batteries, ac. $220/day, 



multi-day disc. Beta SP also available, & techies too. 
Call (212) 242-3009. 

FOR RENT: Chelsea office space. Share w/ small 
nonprofit training & prod. co. $600/desk/month 
includes use of computer, e-mail, phone & fax lines, 
photocopying, video playback equipment (1/2" 6k 
3/4"). Call (212) 255-2718. 

FOR RENT: Hi8 Sony 3-chip VX-3 camcorders, 
$75/day or $400/wk; plus mikes, lighting gear, stands, 
etc. negotiable. Deposit required. Call White St. TV 
Studio (212) 274-0036. 

FOR SALE OR LEASE: Anamorphic lens in top 
condition for use with 16mm film camera. Please 
contact Heidi Levine (215) 487-1776. 

FOR SALE: 3/4" edit system, great condition. Sony 
800 decks w/ TC boards; monitors; new mixer, 
speakers & amp; Sundance Program (an easy to 
learn, Mac-based controller/EDL manager); cables 
6k manuals. Call Jane (212) 254-8045. 

FOR SALE: Sony 3/4" off-line system complete. 
Sony VO-5850, VO-5800 (both time code capable), 
RM-440 controller, 2 Sony CVM-1270 monitors. 
$6,000. Privately owned. (212) 343-0558. 

FOR SALE: Sony 3/4" offline system. Sony VO- 
5850, VO-5800, RM-440 controller, 2 Panasonic 13" 
(BT-1300N) color monitors. Excellent condition, 
privately owned, $6,500. Tom (212) 929-2439. 

FOR SALE: Sony SVD-1000 Hi8 deck, $900. Mint 
condition, used less than 20 hrs. Visca protocol. Call 
George (212)246-4864. 

GREAT EDITING SYSTEM FOR SALE: Sony 
EVO-9700. Hi8 dual decks w/ titler. Excellent con- 
dition, privately owned. $3,000. (718) 232-7572. 

STEAL A NEAR-NEW SONY EVW-300 Pro Hi8 
camera. 3-chip. Canon 13:1. Viewfinder, tripod 
adaptor. Used 10 hrs, still under warranty. Must sell. 
Best offer over $5,000. Rentals poss. Call Steve (212) 
807-6264. 

VALHALLA MULTIMEDIA: Grip 6k lighting pkg 
w/ truck. 35 Arri-BL 6k sound pkgs available. Car rig 
6k special effects (fire 6k smoke rigs). Priced w/ the 
indy filmmaker in mind. (212) 343-0558. 

WORKSHOPS 6k PROD. PKGS IN MEXICO: 

Video 6k film hands-on workshops, summer '96, in 
English. Renting Beta SP Arri, Krasnogorsk 6k post. 
If you need or sell equipment contact us. Fax: (011 
525) 575-1949 or call Pedro Araneda (NYU grad): 
(525) 416-2683. 

Distribution 

ABCs OF LIBRARY DISTRIBUTION: Discover 
the keys to unlocking this lucrative market. Com- 
prehensive report offers sure cure for "Distribution 
Blues." Satisfaction guaranteed. $15.95 (TX +6.25% 
sales tax). MC/Visa/check. Call (800) 697-2391. 

AQUARIUS PRODUCTIONS, INC., leading 
int'l distributor of videos on health care, seeks new 
videos on abuse, violence, addiction 6k special ed as 
well as aging 6k disabilities. Call/send videos for pre- 
view. Leslie Kussman, Aquarius, 5 Powderhouse Ln., 
Sherborn, MA 01770; (508) 651-2963. 

ATA TRADING CORP., actively 6k successfully 



distributing ind. prods, for over 50 yrs, seeks new 
programming of all types for worldwide distribution 
into all markets. Contact us at (212) 594-6460. 

CS ASSOCIATES seeks documentaries for foreign 
6k domestic distribution. We also secure co-prod, 
funds for unfinished projects. Our catalog includes: 
The Civil War, Frontline, Children of Fate 6k The Day 
After Trinity. Call (415) 383-6060. 

DISTRIBUTOR ACCEPTING FILM/VIDEO 
WORK. Any medium. All genres. Send VHS copy 
6k/or query to: Mono Productions, Box 147, East 
Greenville, PA 18041. Reading synopses of screen- 
plays/plays for future prods. 

FANLIGHT PRODUCTIONS, distributor of 
award-winning film 6k video on disabilities, health 
care, mental health, family/social issues, etc. seeks 
new work for distrib. to educational markets. Karen 
McMillen, Fanlight Productions, 47 Halifax St., 
Boston, MA 02130; (800) 937-4113. 

FILMO COMMUNICATIONS PRIVATE LTD, 

Singapore media distrib. co., sourcing programs for 
nontheatrical, educ. 6k public library markets for 
TV, cable 6k video-on-demand. Stephen K. H. Say, 
managing dir., Filmo Communications Pvt Ltd, 
Block 165, Bukit Merah Central #07-3677, 
Singapore 150165, Republic of Singapore; fax: 011 
65 278-1009. 

SEEKING EDUCATIONAL VIDEOS on guid- 
ance issues such as violence, drug prevention 6k par- 
enting for exclusive distribution. Our aggressive 
marketing produces unequaled results. Bureau for 
At-Risk Youth, 645 New York Ave., Huntington, 
NY 11743; (800) 99-YOUTH. 

TAPESTRY INTERNATIONAL, LTD: Exper- 
ienced worldwide TV 6k home video distributor of 
quality docs, drama, music, children's 6k cultural 
programming is actively seeking new acquisitions. 
VHS to: Attn: Anthony LaTorella, 920 Broadway, 
15 fl., NY, NY 10010. 

Freelancers 

16MM PROD. PKG. w/ cinematographer from 
$200/day. Complete pkg incl. camera, Nagra, mikes, 
Mole/Lowell lights, dolly, etc. 16mm post avail.: 
editing, sound xfers to 16 mag (.055/ft.) edgecoding 
(.01/ft.) sound mix ($70/hr.). Tom (201) 807-0155. 

BETA SP cameraman w/ Sony 3-chip BVP- 
70/BVV-5SR avail, for your project. Equip, pkg, DP 
kit, Sennheiser mics., 5-passenger van. Audio engi- 
neer avail. 3/4" offline editing system. Thomas (212) 
929-2439; (201) 667-9894. 

CAMERAMAN: Aaton 16mm or Beta SP prod, 
pkg includes lighting, audio 6k car. Awards 6k expe- 
rience in music video, features, commercials, PBS 
docs, industrials, etc. Professional work ethic. David 
(212) 377-2121. 

CAMERAMAN: Award-winning, sensitive, effi- 
cient. 10 yrs. experience in docs 6k industrials, over- 
seas projects. Complete broadcast-quality Sony 
BVW-300A Beta SP pkg. Rates tailored to prject 6k 
budget. Can speak Japanese. Scott, Public Eye 
Prods., (212) 627-1244. 

CAMERAMAN: Owner Ikegami HC-240 profes- 
sional Hi8 pkg w/ lights, mic, tripod, dolly. Yrs exp. 



48 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



THE ASSOCIATION OF 
INDEPENDENT 



VIDEO & FILMMAKERS 




iverse, committed, 
opinionated, and 
fiercely indepen- 
dent — these are the 
video and filmmak- 
ers who are mem- 
bers of AIVF. 
Documentary and 
feature filmmakers, animators, experi- 
mentalists, distributors, educators, 
students, curators — all concerned 
that their work make a difference — 
find the Association of Independent 
Video and Filmmakers, the national 
service organization for independent 
producers, vital to their professional 
lives. Whether it's our magazine, The 
Independent Film & Video Monthly, or 
the organization raising its collective 
voice to advocate for important 
issues, AIVF preserves your indepen- 
dence while letting you know you're 
not alone. 

AIVF helps you save time and money 
as well. You'll find you can spend 
more of your time (and less of your 
money) on what you do best — getting 
your work made and seen. To succeed 
as an independent today, you need a 
wealth of resources, strong connec- 
tions, and the best information avail- 
able. So join with more than 5,000 
other independents who rely on AIVF 
to help them succeed. 

JOIN AIVF TODAY! 

Here's what membership offers: 

THE INDEPENDENT FILM & 
VIDEO MONTHLY 

Membership provides you with a 
year's subscription to The Independent. 
Thought-provoking features, news, 



and regular columns on business, 
technical, and legal matters. Plus fes- 
tival listings, funding deadlines, exhi- 
bition venues, and announcements of 
member activities and new programs 
and services. Special issues highlight 
regional activity and focus on subjects 
including media education and the 
new technologies. 

INSURANCE 

Members are eligible to purchase dis- 
counted personal and production 
insurance plans through AIVF suppli- 
ers. A wide range of health insurance 
options are available, as well as special 
liability, E&O, and production plans 
tailored for the needs of low-budget 
mediamakers. 

TRADE DISCOUNTS 

A growing list of businesses across the 
country offer AIVF members dis- 
counts on equipment and auto 
rentals, film processing, transfers, 
editing, and other production necessi- 
ties. Plus long-distance and overnight 
courier services are available at spe- 
cial rates for AIVF members from 
national companies. In New York, 
members receive discounted rates at 
two hotels to make attendance at our 
programs and other important events 
more convenient. 

CONFERENCE /SCREENING 
ROOM 

AIVF's new office has a low-cost 

facility for members to hold meetings 
and small private screenings of work 
for friends, distributors, programmers, 
funders, and producers. 



INFORMATION 

We distribute a series of publications 
on financing, funding, distribution, 
and production; members receive dis- 
counts on selected titles. AIVF's staff 
also can provide information about 
distributors, festivals, and general 
information pertinent to your needs. 
Our library houses information on 
everything from distributors to sample 
contracts to budgets. 

WORKSHOPS, PANELS, AND 
SEMINARS 

Members get discounts on events cov- 
ering the whole spectrum of current 
issues and concerns affecting the 
field, ranging from business and aes- 
thetic to technical and political top- 
ics. Plus: members-only evenings with 
festival directors, producers, distribu- 
tors, cable programmers, and funders. 

ADVOCACY 

Members receive periodic advocacy 
alerts, with updates on important leg- 
islative issues affecting the indepen- 
dent field and mobilization for collec- 
tive action. 

COMMUNITY 

AIVF sponsors monthly member get- 
togethers in cities across the country; 
call the office for the one nearest you. 
Plus members are carrying on active 
dialogue online — creating a "virtual 
community" for independents to 
share information, resources, and 
ideas. Another way to reach fellow 
independents to let them know about 
your screenings, business services, and 
other announcements is by renting 
our mailing list, available at a dis- 
count to members. 



"HP 



MEMBERSHIP CATEGORIES 

Individual/Student Membership 

Year's subscription to The Independent • Access to all plans and discounts • Festival/ 
Distribution/Library services • Information Services • Discounted admission to seminars • 
Book discounts • Advocacy action alerts • Eligibility to vote and run for board of directors 

Supporting Membership 

All the above for two individuals at one address, with 1 subscription to The Independent 

Non-profit Organizational/Business & Industry Membership 

All the above benefits, except access to health insurance plans • 2 copies of The Independent 
• 1 free FIVF-published book per year • Complimentary bulk shipments of The Independent 
to conferences, festivals, and other special events • Special mention in The Independent • 
Representative may vote and run for board of directors 



Library Subscription 

Year's subscription to The Independent only 



JOIN AIVF TODAY 



Membership Rates <5 

Q $25/student (enclose copy of student ID) 

□ $4S- $40/individual (special rate thru 4/30/96) 
Q $75/supporting 

□ $75/Hbrary subscription 

Q $100/non-profit organization 
Q $150/business 6k industry 

□ Magazines are mailed Second-class; add $20 for 

First class mailing 

$ 

Name(s) <t 



Organization 

Address 

City 

State 



ZIP 



Country 

Weekday tel. 
Fax 



Acct # 



Foreign Mailing Rates 

□ Surface mail 

(incl. Canada & Mexico) - Add $10 

□ Air mail 

— Canada, Mexico, Western Hemisphere- 
Add $20 
—Europe - Add $40 
— Asia, Pacific Rim, Africa - Add $50 

Membership cost 

Mailing costs (if applicable) 

Contribution tO FIVF (make separate tax-deductible check payable to FIVF) 

Total amount enclosed (check or money order ) 
Or please bill my □ Visa □ MC 



Exp. date I II I 



Signature^ 



AIVF, 304 Hudson St., 6th fl., NY, NY 10013; (212) 807-1400; fax (212) 463-8519 



SB 



m 



in doc &. ENG. Current camera reporter at 
W17BM. Flexible rates. Will travel. 5-passenger 
station wagon avail. Fluency in Korean. Contact 
Kwi (212) 274-0142. 

CAMERAMAN: Owner Sony EVW-300 pro Hi8 
pkg. NYC-based, flexible rates. Will travel. 
Conversational French & Italian. Background in 
photography ck sculpture. For more info, contact 
John Anderson (212) 875-9731. 

CAMERAWOMAN w/ good ideas, easy to work 
w/. Own 16mm Arri BL, Bolex, video Hi8. Doc, 
experimental, narrative, music video. Engage pas- 
sionate projects. Lori Hiris (212) 628-3913. 

CAMERAWOMAN: professionally & creatively 
pushes the limits of Hi8, Beta SP & low budget 
16mm. Hi8 pkg: Canon L-l, zoom 6k w/a lenses; fil- 
ters, mics., tripod. Beta pkg also avail. Eileen (718) 
963-2158. 

CINEMATOGRAPHER w/ Aaton pkg, reg. & S- 
16 capable. Narrative, music videos, docs. Flexible 
rates for low 6k no budget projects. Call Kevin 
(212) 229-8357. 

CINEMATOGRAPHER w/ interesting credits 
owns 35mm 6k S-16/16mm Aaton pkg for your fea- 
ture film, short or music video. Contact Brendan 
Flynt for info 6k reel at tel/fax: (212) 226-8417; e- 
mail ela292@aol.com. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY, experi- 
enced, w/ Arri 16 SR 6k Aaton S- 16 pkgs, plus 
Mole Richardson lighting pkg, seeks interesting film 
projects in feature or short-subject form. Very rea- 
sonable rates for new directors 6k screenwriters. 
(212) 737-6815; fax 423-1 125. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY looking for 
interesting features, shorts, ind. projects, etc. 
Credits include features, commercials, industrials, 
short films, music videos. Aaton 16/S-16 pkg avail. 
Call Abe (914) 783-3159. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY looking for 
provocative dramatic films 6k feature shorts. Award 
winning, creative 6k efficient. Doc/commercial/net- 
work credits. Owner Aaton XTR Prod 6k Beta SP 
& AVID MC400. Great reel. Richard (212) 247- 
2471. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY w/ awards, 
talent 6k experience. Credits incl. features, com- 
mercials, industrials, docs, shorts 6k music videos. 
Owner of A.iton I6mm/S-16 pkg. 35mm pkg also 
avail. Call for my reel. Bob (212) 741-2189. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY, 1 5 yrs expe- 
rience, w/ or w/o equipment 6x crew. Special rates 
in documentaries, Fluent in Italian; EEC passport. 
Renato Tonelli, tel/fax (718) 478-2132; e-mail 
Renatol54(S a. 4. com. 

DP W/ IKEGAMI DIGITAL CAMERA, BVW 
50 or BVV 5, full field Betacam Sr pkg (Am lights, 
Vmten tripod, top-quality audio, transportation.) 
Network mil credits, competitive r,no. Fluency in 
Spanish. Hal (212) 228-7748. 

ENTERTAINMENT ATTORNEY: Frequeni 
contributor to "Legal Briefs" columns in The 
Independent 6s. other magazines, offers legal services 

to film 6m. video community on projec CS from devel- 
opment to distribution. Reasonable rates. Contact: 



Northeast Negative Matchers, Irj( 

"Setting New Standards In Negative Cutting" 
Negative Cutting to Film or Video Workprint 

SPECIALIZING IN VIDEO MATCHBACK TO THE AVID FILM COMPOSER 

□ 35mm □ Super 16mm □16mm 



25 Riverview Terrace • Springfield, MA 01 108 • 413/736-2177 • 800/370-CUTS 
North Miami Office 305/940-8878 




£$^^ 



presents. 



viiTii 



NON-LINEAR 

EDITING 



The source for all of your 
pre-production software 

800-9-SHEBANG 



Everything!! 

From 

Storyforming 

to 

Actualizing 



"74e TV&ote S/ic(i«<tf is the East Coast dealer for 
Movie Magic, Storyboard Quick/Artist, 
screenwriting software, many more, all at 
UNBEATABLE PRICES. Call for our free catalog. 




email: info@shebang.com fax: 20J-963-8563 
web site: http://www.shebang.com 



MEDIA 100 SYSTEM 

• True broadcast-quality 

• "Off-line" and "On-line" with 
"Ail-OrhOm"™ mastering 

• Multi-track, 16-bit, 44.1kHz 
(CD-quality) audio mixing 

• CG, Color FX, Motion FX 

• BetaSP Deck 



PLUS... 

ANIMATED 
GRAPHICS, 

COMPOSmNG 




AFWR 
EFFECTS! 




film fi Video 



INC. 



(2i2i 226-1 152 

• COMPETETIVE RATES 

• CALL FOR FREE CONSULTATION 



. .■ ICftl 



ELARMADILLO 



SONY XUbSSMIsp 




212-714-3550 
292 5th Ave, 4th fl. 



A/E3 Roll $r35/hr 

Straight cuts $75/hr 

Window dubs/transfers 

Auto conform from CMX EDL/s 

MEDIA Macintosh 

^^^^^^^based nonlinear 

l I § [ § editing system 

$1000/wk includes 

9 gigabyte hard drive 

DAT storage backup 

Fhotoehop/Coea After Effects 



March 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 49 



Digital Beta On-Line 



AVID 




Pictures 



>66 Broadway New York City 
Hi-8 Component Transfers ^ 



WHEN IT COMES TO 




WE ARE 
THE EXPERTS! 




NEW YORK 

420 LEXINGTON AVENUE 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 10170-0199 

TEL: (212) 867-3550 • FAX: (212) 983-6483 

JOLYON F. STERN, President 

CAROL A. BRESSI, Vice President 



AFFILIATES IN: LONDON • PARIS • MUNICH 



Hi-8/Betacam Sp 

Packages 

SONY, BETACAM SP CAMCORDER 
PACKAGE... $400 

SONY, PRO HI BAND 
PACKAGE... $200 

INCLUDED IN EACH PACKAGE: 

■ Light Kit plus Sun Gun w/Battery Belt 

■ Audio Kit plus Shore Field Mixer FP32 

■ Field monitor ■ Fluid tripod 

■ 

VHS-VHS PROFESSIONAL 
EDITING SYSTEM 

DO YOUR HI-8 AND BETACAM SP 
OFF LINE EDITING ON: 

JVC BB8600U to JVC BB8600U 
W/RM86U editing console... $10 per/hr. 

PEOPLE W/AIDS PROJECTS DISCOONT 



Manahatta Images Corp. 

260 WEST 10TH STREET, STE. IE 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10014 
212-807-8825 FAX AVAILABLE 





Video 


Rentals 


Location 


packages 


j 


BetaSP/Hi8mm/Audio/Lighting/Crew or rental 


Editing 






S-VHS location rentals or on-site 


Reasonable rates 




Great packages 






212 


260 7748 



Robert L. Seigel, Esq. (212) 307-7533. 

EXPERIENCED LOW-BUDGET DOCUMEN- 
TARY CAMERAMAN. Make the most of your 
limited dollars. Varied background. 3-chip Hi8 
camera, Steadicam Jr, sound gear. Contact Sam, 
voice -mail/pager (800) 957-6296. 

LOCATION SOUNDMEN: Over 20 yrs sound 
exp. w/ Time Code Nagra, quality mics, etc. Will 
consider projects anywhere, anytime. Reduced 
rates for low-budget films/videos. Contact Harvey 
& Fred Edwards (518) 677-5720; beeper (800) 
796-7363, ext/pin 1021996. 

MUSIC BY COMPOSER who has scored over 7 
award-winning films. Owns & operates complete 
music prod, facility w/ multitrack recording & 
works well w/ directors 6k editors. "The music 
speaks for itself." Nana Simopoulos (212) 727- 
3705. 

STEADICAM: Dolly smooth moves w/ the flexi- 
bility of a hand-held camera. Call Sergei Franklin 
(212) 228-4254. 

I SU-CITY PICTURES EAST PRESENTS: The 

Screenplay Doctor, The Movie Mechanic 6k The 
Film Strategists — story editors/post-prod, special- 
ists will analyze your work-in-progress. Studio/ind. 
background. Multimedia 6k adv. technology con- 
sultations. Competitive rates. (212) 219-9224- 
WORD PROCESSING provided by certified pro- 
fessional secretary from handwritten/typed copy or 

j taped dictation. Transcription of audiotapes 6k 
videotapes also available. Donna Chambers, The 

I Electronic Cottage, (770) 832-7188. 

Opportunities • Gigs 

ASSOC. PROF., TV & FILM PROD, to teach 
electronic media 6k film in undergrad 6k MFA pro- 
grams 6k later assume leadership of production fac- 
ulty. For info, contact Dept. of Radio-Television- 
Film, Univ. of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712; 
(512) 471-4071. AA/EOE. 

FILM CREW TRAINEES NEEDED. Ground 
floor opportunity. Atlanta area production assis- 
tants 6k/or knowledgeable persons, send resume or 
call PC Jenkins for interview. Mecca Motion 
Picture Corp., 1100 Circle 75 Pky., ste. 800, 
Atlanta, GA 30339; (404) 808-7139. 

OFFICE MANAGER. Busy doc company. Low 
pay. Great experience. Resume to: 462 Broadway 
#520, NY, NY 10013. 

Preproduction • Development 

MP/TV CO-PROD CONSULTANT. Award- 
winning producer evaluates projects suitable for 
int'l joint ventures. Devel./pkging solutions. 
Funding connections. Wendy (213) 654-7227, fax 
654-2708. 

RAISE PROD. FUNDS via the nonprofit route! 
Frontier Films, a tax-exempt nonprofit offers fiscal 
sponsorship agreements. Open up the following 
channels for $$$: gov't agencies, foundations, 
corps., private individuals. Call (212) 988-0254- 

RUSSIA, CIS & E. EUROPE: Stretch your bud- 
get! US company in Moscow w/ contacts every- 



50 THE INDEPENDENT March 1996 



where provides location scouting 6k prod, services. 
Fax: 011-7-095-216-8162; e-mail moscinema® 
glas.apc.org. Member AIVF & IDA. 

SCREENPLAYS SOUGHT by producer making 
2nd feature. Should be suited to $1 million budget. 
Characters should be sympathetic — if not likable — 
6k ending should offer at least a glimmer of hope. 
SASE w/ script to: BRAN, Box 6249, San Diego, 
CA 92166. 

POSTPRODUCTION 

$10/HR VHS EDIT SUITE: $20-3/4", $15-interf. 
Free titles, Amiga, special effects. Also avail.: Hi8, 
dubs, A/B roll, photo, slides, stills, audio, produ- 
tion, total S-8 sound film svcs, editor/training. The 
Media Loft, 727 6th Ave. (23rd); (212) 924-4893. 

1/2" VHS AND SVHS EDITING SYSTEMS for 
rent. Prices start at $200 per week. Award-winning 
editor available. Call David (212) 362-1056. 

3/4" SONY OFFLINE SYSTEM delivered to you 
6k installed: 5850, 5800, RM 440, 2 monitors, 
$500/wk., $l,600/mo. Delivery 6k installation incl. 
Equipment clean 6k professionally maintained. 
Thomas (212) 929-2439; (201) 667-9894. 

3/4" SP SONY OFFLINE SYSTEM W/ TIME- 
CODE: 9850 deck w/ timecode generator/reader, 
9800 deck w/ timecode reader, RM450 controller 6k 
2 13" monitors. Negotiable, low rates. Call (718) 
284-2645. 

16MM 6k 3 5 MM FILM TO TAPE TRANSFER: 

$1 50/hr for 1 light, unsupervised transfer using a 



Rank Cintel Mark IIIC 6k Sunburst color corrector. 
Master to most any video format. High quality. 
Experienced staff. VidiPax (212) 982-5676 ex. 101. 

16MM 6k 35MM OPTICAL SOUND TRACKS! If 

you want "High Quality" sound for your film, you 
need a High Quality sound negative. Mike Holloway, 
Optical Sound/Chicago Inc., 24 W. Erie, Chicago, IL 
60610; (312) 943-1771 or (708) 541-8488. 

16MM CUTTING ROOMS: 8-plate 6k 6-plate fully 
equipped rooms, sound-transfer facilities, 24-hr 
access. Downtown, near all subways 6k Canal St. 
Reasonable rates. (212) 925-1500. 

16MM FULLY EQUIPPED CUTTING ROOM: 

$6/hr. 16 mag transfers also avail, on premises. Avid 
1000 6k film composer w/ off-line/on-line capabilities 
also avail, for reasonable rates. 24-hr access. Chelsea 
area. (212) 595-5002; (718) 885-0955. 

16MM SOUND MLX only $70/hr! Fully equipped 
mix studio for features, shorts, docs. Bring in your cut 
16mm tracks, walk out w/ final mix. 16mm transfers 
also avail, from 1/4" Nagra, DAT, or CD. (Only 
.055/ft. incl. stock.) Tom (201) 807-0155. 

ATLANTA FILM/VIDEO POSTPRODUC- 
TION: Serving the no-budget, low-budget filmmak- 
er. Nonlinear digital picture editing, digital audio edi- 
ting w/ picture lockup. $20/hr w/ editor. Contact Cliff 
Lyttle at Mecca Digital Postworks, (404) 808-7139. 

AVID EDITOR w/ varied credits available for long 
or short projects at negotiable rates. (212) 465-3153. 

BETA SP ON-LINE EDITING: $75/hr w/ editor. 
A/B roll, component or composite, wipes, dissolves, 



special EFX, mixer w/ CD 6k cassette players. Editor 
w/ 20 yrs exp. Non-smoking environment. East 72nd 
St. Michael or Robin (212) 570-4040. 

BRODSKY 6k TREADWAY: Film-to-tape masters. 
Reversal only. Regular 8mm, S-8, or archival 16mm 
to 1" or Betacam- SP We love early B6kW 6k 
Kodachrome. Scene -by- scene only. Correct frame 
rates. For appointment, call (508) 948-7985. 

EDITOR w/ fully equipped 16mm editing facility w/ 
high-speed KEM to edit 6k/or sync features, shorts, 
etc. Reasonable rates for good projects. Award win- 
ning reel. Lisa (718) 522-1230. 

GUARANTEED LOWEST RATES IN TOWN 

for D/Vision non-linear 6k Sony 3/4" offline editing 
systems. Long or short term rental, your place or ours. 
Creative Thinking (212) 629-5320. 

INT'L VIDEO TRANSFERS: From US to PAL, 
PAL-M, PAL N, Secam; from PAL, PAL-M, PAL N to 
US. All video formats: VHS, S-VHS, Hi8, 3/4", 
Betacam. Fast, professional, affordable. Barry (212) 
941-5800. 

INTERFORMAT OFFLINE SUITE (3/4", Hi8, 
VHS). Sony system in clean, spacious uptown loca- 
tion. VO9850/9800 w/ RM450, 2 13" monitors, Hi8 
6k VHS. Rates: $12/hr, $85/day, $380/wk. Editor 
$15/hr. Dubs in 3/4", VHS, Hi8. (212) 316-3842. 

SOUND EDITOR/MLXER: Great work, reasonable 
rates. All work guaranteed! Pro Tools dig. audio 
workstation. Sweetening, FX, etc. Talented, efficient 
editor/mixer avail, for all film/video projects. 
References. HIP Studios (212) 629-5251. 




THE 




A non-profit media arts organi- 
zation providing access to state- 
of-the-art video post-production 
services for artists and indepen- 
dent producers at drastically 
discounted rates ~ Wide range 
of services available ~ Standby 
publishes FELIX, A Journal of 
Media Arts and Communication. 



Some of Standby's hourly rates: 

• Interformat editing: $85 

• One inch editing: $120 

• Non-linear editing: $60 

• Audio post-production: $60 

• Chyron: $10 

• ADO: $10 

First extra service free! 



PO Box 184, Prince Street Station 
New York, NY 10012 I 

Phone: (212)219-0951 
Fax: (212)219-0563 



March 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 51 




NOTICES OF RELEVANCE TO AIVF MEMBERS ARE LIST- 
ED FREE OF CHARGE AS SPACE PERMITS. THE 
INDEPENDENT RESERVES THE RIGHT TO EDIT FOR 
LENGTH AND CAN MAKE NO GUARANTEES ABOUT THE 
NUMBER OF PLACEMENTS FOR A GIVEN NOTICE. 
PLEASE TRY TO LIMIT SUBMISSIONS TO 60 WORDS 
AND INDICATE HOW LONG INFORMATION WILL BE 
CURRENT. DEADLINE IS THE 1ST OF THE MONTH, TWO 
MONTHS PRIOR TO THE COVER DATE (E.G., APRIL 1 
FOR THE JUNE ISSUE). COMPLETE CONTACT INFOR- 
MATION (NAME, MAILING ADDRESS & TELEPHONE 
NUMBERS) MUST ACCOMPANY ALL NOTICES. SEND 
TO: INDEPENDENT NOTICES, FIVF, 304 HUDSON ST., 
6TH FL, NY, NY 10013. WE TRY TO BE AS CURRENT AS 
POSSIBLE, BUT PLEASE DOUBLE-CHECK BEFORE 
SUBMITTING TAPES OR APPLICATIONS. 



Conferences • Workshops 

ADVOCACY DAY: 1996 Nancy Hanks Lecture on 
Arts and Public Policy will take place on March 19th 
at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing 
Arts in Washington, D.C. Carlos Fuentes will deliv- 
er the lecture. National Advocacy Day and related 
activities are tentatively scheduled for the following 
day. Contact Lissa Rosenthal at the American 
Council for the Arts, (212) 223-2787 ext.242, fax: 
(212) 223-4415 

CINESTORY: A SCREENWRITER'S CONSER- 
VATORY, sponsored by Columbia College Chicago 
6k Columbia 2 Extension. 5 film industry writers & 
producers work w/ screenwriters on March 15-17 at 
Chicago's Hyatt. Offers small group roundtables on 
writing sans Hollywood formula. Indiv. & group ses- 
sions on developing cinematic ideas, script draft 
process, alternative access to screen. Contact 
CineStory at (708) 328-2094 or 1-800-6STORY; fax: 
(708) 328-2043; Cinestoryp@aol.com. 

INTERNATIONAL FILM & VIDEO WORK- 
SHOPS IN TUSCANY, ITALY, offers 30 1-wk. 
workshops & master classes in cinematography, 
directing, editing, writing, producing & camera work. 
Also, 4-wk. introductory summer program for uni- 
versity students and others. Workshops begin May 5. 
Contact David H. Lyman (207) 236-8581; fax 2558. 

THE PERRY GROUP is inviting writers to submit 
character-based unproduced TV comedies for The 
Comedy Lab, an invitational free workshop. Scripts 
will be staged in a four-workshop series beginning in 
June 1996. Send to Literary Manager, Gary Swartz, 



221 Avenue A, #18, New York, NY 10009. 

PLAYBACK 1996 brings together a diverse group 
of professionals to undertake the challenge of pre- 
serving cultural and artistic history recorded on 
videotape. Information recorded w/ video hardware 
susceptible to extinction if preservation techniques 
6k standards are not defined. March 29, 30, San 
Francisco Museum of Modern Art. For info, contact 
Bay Area Video Coalition, 1111 17th St., San 
Francisco, CA 94107. 

REWIRING OUR NETWORKS: CULTURAL 
EQUITY IN THE 2 1ST CENTURY. 1996 
NAMAC National Conference is part of an ongoing 
long range national effort toward community build- 
ing betw. media arts, other community-based organi- 
zations, small businesses & entrepreneurial interests 
to identify 6k prepare for the opportunities and dan- 
gers of the Information Age. Berkeley Marina 
Marriott Hotel, March 29 - April 1 . Contact Julian 
Low (510) 451-2717; fax 2715; e-mail: NAMAC 
@aol.com. 

STORYTELLING FOR THE NEW MILLENNI- 
UM, an event sponsored by the Kauai Institute and 
the American Film Institute, will address recent 
trends in filmmaking, new media, graphic design, 
sound design, Internet design, and publishing with 
top figures in these fields. Hands-on digital work- 
shops April 22-24, conference April 25-28, in Kauai, 
Hawaii. For info or to register, call (800) 999-4234 or 
(213) 856-7690; fax (213) 467-4578; URL: 
http://www.afionline.org. 



Films • Tapes Wanted 

AIR 6k SPACE NETWORK, a new cable 6k satel- 
lite TV network, is looking for programs related to 
aviation, space, space flight, exploration, astronomy, 
weather, etc. Biographies are also of interest. Fiction, 
nonfiction, docs, educational, informational, or gen- 
eral entertainment. Contact: ASN, 2701 NW 
Vaughn St., ste. 475, Portland, OR 97210-5366; 
(503) 224-9821; fax: 241-3507. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF GRAPHIC ARTS, 

Washington, DC chapt., in search of innovative live- 
action 6k animated film shorts for a 2-hr. film festival 
in June. VHS previewing by April 30. Tapes 
returned. Please contact or send video to AIGA Film 
Night, Marty Anderson Design, 804 D Street, NE, 
Washington, DC 20002; (202) 544-1596. 

ARC GALLERY jurying for solo and group exhibi- 
tions for the 96-97 season. Two categories: All 
media, including performance, video 6k film; and 
Raw Space, a dedicated installation space. Deadline: 
April 30. Send SASE for prospectus: ARC Gallery, 
1040 W. Huron, Chicago, IL 60622; (312) 733-2787. 

ART IN GENERAL seeks video works 6k guest- 
curated video programs for new monthly screening 
series. All kinds of work welcome, from experimental 
film 6k video to home videos; doc 6k activist to pub- 
lic access works. Send VHS tape (cued), resume 
6Vor brief statement 6k SASE to: Art in General, 79 
Walker St., New York, NY 10013. For more info, call 
Joanna Spitzner (212) 219-0473. 

ASHLAND CABLE ACCESS seeks video shows 



on VHS, S-VHS 6k 3/4", any length or genre. For 
return, incl. sufficient SASE. Send w/ description 6k 
release to Suzi Aufderheide, Southern Oregon State 
College, RVTV, 1250 Siskiyou Blvd., Ashland, OR 
97520; (541) 552- 



AUSTIN, TEXAS, ind. producer offering cable 
access venue to showcase ind. films 6k videos, all 
genres 6k subject matter. Shorts 6k music videos 
linked by discussions on ind. films. Films/videos run- 
ning longer than 40 min. may be aired in series of 2 
consecutive shows. Send release 6k info about 
film/filmmaker. 1/4" 6k 3/4" preferable. No payment, 
but credit 6k exposure. James Shelton, Tex-Cinema 
Productions, Box 3633, Austin, TX 78764-3633; 
(512) 867-9901. 

AXLEGREASE, a Buffalo cable access program of 
ind. film 6k video, is accepting all genres, under 28 
min., 1/2", 3/4", 8mm, Hi8. Send labeled with name, 
address, title, length, additional info 6k SASE for 
tape return to Squeaky Wheel, 175 Elmwood Ave., 
Buffalo, NY 14201. (716) 884-7172; wheel® 
freenet.buffalo.edu; WWW: http://freenet. buffa- 
lo. edu/~wheel. 

BLACK BOOT MEDIA PROJECT of Perry 
County Ind. Media Arts Center seeks ind. film 6k 
video works for regular series of roving screenings at 
various industrial, commerical 6k residential venues 
in Philadelphia and Harrisburg area. Submit S-8, 
16mm, VHS or S-VHS w/ SASE to PCIMAC, 
Lower Bailey Rd., RR2-Box 65, Newport, PA 
17074. For more info contact Jeff Dardozzi (215) 
545-7884. 

BLACK ENTERTAINMENT TELEVISION 

seeks films 6k videos by black ind. makers, directors, 
or producers for "Black Vision" portion of Screen 
Scene, weekly 1/2-hr show that previews TV lineup 
6k latest theatrical releases. Contact: Screen Scene, 
BET, 1899 9th St. NE, Washington, DC 20018; 
(202) 608-2800. 

BLACK VTOEO PERSPECTIVE, new communi- 
ty TV prod, in Atlanta area, seeks works for/by/ 
about African Americans. Contact: Karen L. Forest 
(404) 231-4846. 

BLACKCHAIR PRODUCTIONS currently 
accepting works of any genre for ongoing Public 
Exposure program. Works will be considered for a bi- 
monthly "video-zine," open-screenings, galleries, 
clubs, rave-parties, nat'l public-access programs, 
submissions to fests, competitions 6k calls-for-works. 
Let us use our marketing skills to get your works 
seen. No fee to submit. Send 1/2", Hi8, or 8mm w/ 
SASE for tape return to: Joel S. Bachar, Blackchair 
Productions, 2318 Second Ave., #313-A, Seattle, 
WA 98121; witerain@nwrain.com. 

CAFE Y PELICULA looking for films 6k videos for 
possible monthly exhibition. Students' work wel- 
come. No payment; ongoing deadline. Send 3/4" or 
1/2" with appropriate release, credits, awards 6k per- 
sonal info to: Cafe y Pelicula, PO Box 362991, San 
Juan, PR 00936-2991; crubin@caribe.net. 

CHILDREN'S MEDIA PROJECT seeks tax- 
deductible donations of film 6k video equipment. 
Needs monitors, cameras, decks, etc. 71 Robinson 
Ln.,Wappingers Falls, NY 12590; (914) 227-1838. 



52 THE INDEPENDENT March 1996 



CINCINNATI ARTISTS' GROUP EFFORT 

seeks proposals for exhibitions, performances & 
audio/video/film works to show in their galleries. 
Experimental, traditional & collaborative projects 
encouraged. Contact: CAGE, 1416 Main St., 
Cincinnati, OH 45210; (513) 381-2437. 

CINE CLUB seeks VHS submissions of ind. shorts 
for future programs. Send SASE & brief resume to: 
Cine Club c/o Sophie Fenwick, 335 Court St., 82, 
Brooklyn, NY 11231. Also welcomes proposals 
from ind. curators & others. 

CINEQUEST, weekly 1/2-hr. TV series profiling 
best of nat'l & int'l ind. cinema & video, looking for 
films/videos, all genres, less than 20 min. to air on 
30 min. cable show. Work over 20 min. will air on 
monthly special in Orlando, FL, market during 
primetime. Concept of show is to stretch percep- 
tions of conventional TV & expose viewers to 
scope & talent of inds. Submit on 1/2" or 3/4" 
video. Submissions need not be recent, no limit or 
deadline. Will acknowledge receipt in 10 days. 
Send pre-paid mailer for return. Contact: Michael 
D. McGowan, Producer, Cinequest Productions, 
2550 Alafayia Trail, Apt. 8100, Orlando, FL 32826; 
(407) 658-4865. 

CITY TV, an Emmy Award-winning, progressive 
municipal cable channel in Santa Monica, seeks 
programming of any length, esp. works about 
seniors, disabled, children, Spanish-lang. & video 
art. Our budget is limited, but we offer opportunity 
for producers to showcase work. Cablecast rights 
may be exchanged for equip, access. Contact: Lisa 
Bernard, Programming Specialist, City TV, 1685 
Main St., Santa Monica, CA 90401; (310) 458- 
8913. 

DUTV-CABLE 54, a progressive nonprofit access 
channel in Philadelphia, seeks works by ind. pro- 
ducers. All genres & lengths considered. No pay- 
ment; will return tapes. VHS, S-VHS & 3/4" 
accepted. Contact: George McCollough or Maria 
Mongelli, DUTV-Cable 54, Drexel Univ., 33rd &. 
Chesnut Sts., Philadelphia, PA 19104; (215) 895- 
2927. 

HALCYON DAYS PRODUCTIONS seeks 
video segments (1-5 min.) by 15- to 25-year-olds for 
video compilation show. If piece is selected, you 
may have chance to be video correspondent for 
show. Work may he editorial, real-life coverage, 
political satire, slapstick — you decide. Just person- 
alize. Submit VHS or Hi8 (returnable w/ SASE) to: 
Mai Kim Holley, Halcyon Days Prod., c/o Hi8, 12 
West End Ave., 5th fl., NY, NY 10023; (212) 397- 
7754. 

HERE, .i nonprofit arts organization, seeks submis- 
sions of films 6k videos for 1995-96 season. 16mm, 
8mm, 3/4", all genres &. lengths. Installation pro- 
posals also welcome. Send VHS, resume & descrip- 
tion of work to: HERE, 145 Ave. of the Americas, 
frnt. I, NY, NY 10013, attn: film/video. Enclose 
SASE tor more into, about upcoming season. 

IN THE MLX, nat'l PBS series, seeks short (2-8") 
videos produced by teens or young adults. Any for- 
mat. Send w/ description, name & phone to: In the 
Mix, 102 E. 30th St., NY, NY 10016, attn: student 
videos. 




TIRED OF THE YEAR END 
TAX MESS? 

Do you need an accountant whose 
there for you throughout 
the year? # 

SOLUTION . . . 

• Preparing your Tax Return 

• Answering your Tax Questions 

• Helping you benefit from the Tax Laws 

• Assisting you in your Bookkeeping 

• Affordable 

SPECIALIZING IN 
• FILM & VIDEO ARTS • 



VASCO ACCOUNTING 

WEST 20TH STREET 
SUITE 808 
-, NEW YORK. NY 1 00 11 



AVID. AVID. AVID. AVID. 



TEL:212»989«4789 
FAX: 212»9S9«4897 




LUNA 

PICTURES 



LOW RATES // FABULOUS ROOMS 

ON-LINE // OFF-LINE 

NEW CUSTOMER DISCOUNT 



34 W 17th Street 

212 477 4493 



AVID. AVID. AVID. AVID. 



T h e Film « Video 

Institute 



Evening and Weekend Courses. 

Courses for everyone from beginners to 
working professionals. 

STARTS MAY 13, 1996! FOR A BROCHURE CALL (202)885-2500; 
OR E-MAIL US AT FILM ©AMERICAN.EDU 



Film 

Television 

Multimedia 
& Interactive 



Video Produ cing 
Editing Directing 



E 



screenwriting 
Documentary 



AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 



w 



TON 



D C 



t's our 15th year! 



March 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 53 



An Edit Room with windows?!? 
YES! 

New AVID Media Composer 4000 

System 5.2 w/ AVR-27 & 18 GB 

Available in our Sunny SoHo studio or delivered to you. 
• Office space available • 



J\> 



contact Rob Lawson at: 
Lovett Productions, Inc. 



(212)242-8999 




TAKE THE 

NECESSARY 

STEPS 




D.R. REIFF 
& ASSOCIATES 

ENTERTAINMENT INSURANCE 

BROKERS 

320 WEST 57 ST 

NEW YORK, NY 10019 

(212) 603-0231 FAX (212) 247-0739 




non-Linear editing jjor Independentd 



©212.254.4361 



IN VISIBLE COLOURS Film & Video Society 
seeks videos by women of color for library collec- 
tion. Work will be accessible to members, produc- 
ers, multicultural groups & educational institu- 
tions. For more info, contact: Claire Thomas, In 
Visible Colours, 1 19 W. Pender, ste. 115, Vancouver, 
B.C. V6B 1S5; (604) 682-1116. 

IND. FILM & VIDEO SHOWCASE, cable 
access show; seeks student & ind. films & videos 
to give artists exposure. Send films or video in 3/4" 
format w/ paragraph about artist &. his/her work. 
Send to: The Independent Film & Video Showcase, 
6755 Yucca St., #8, Hollywood, CA 90028, Attn: 
Jerry Salata. 

THE KNITTING FACTORY VIDEO 
LOUNGE seeks VHS tapes for on-going weekly 
series of theme -based screenings. Any genre or 
subject matter. Sent tape w/ brief bio to Lisa 
Deanne Smith c/o AIVF, 304 Hudson St., 6th fl., 
New York, NY 10013. 

LATINO COLLABORATIVE, bimonthly 
screening series seeks works by Latino film/video- 
makers. Honoraria paid. Send VHS preview tapes 
to: Latino Collaborative Bimonthly Screening 
Series, Vanessa Codorniu, 280 Broadway, ste. 412, 
NY, NY 10007; (212) 732-1121. 

MIXED SIGNALS, award-winning cable TV 
series produced by the New England Foundation 
for the Arts, is accepting submissions for an 
upcoming series. This year's theme: relationship 
between people & their work. Any style or genre, 
w/ 28-min. maximum & priority given to work 
under 6 mins. Submissions must be on 1/2" tape, 
though selected artists must provide a 3/4" or Beta 
broadcast quality tape. Payment for selected work. 
Deadline: April 8. For appls & additional info con- 
tact: New England Foundation for the Arts, 330 
Congress St., 6th fl., Boston, MA 02210-1216; 
(617) 951-0010. 

NERVOUS IMPULSE, nat'l screening series 
focusing on science, seeks films/videos. Open to 
experimental, non-narrative & animated works 
that address scientific representation or knowledge 
or interplay between science & culture. Send pre- 
view VHS & SASE to: Nervous Impulse, Times 
Square Station, PO Box 2578, NY, NY 10036- 
2578. 

NEW DAY FILMS, the premiere distribution 
cooperative for social issue media, seeks energetic 
ind. film & video makers w/ challenging social 
issue docs for distribution to nontheatrical mar- 
kets. Now accepting appls for new membership. 
Conctact New Day Films, (914) 485-8489. 

NEWCITY PRODUCTIONS seeks completed 
or in-progress docs on all subjects for monthly 
screenings. Committed to promoting ind. commu- 
nity by establishing forum of new voices. Have 
professional large screen video projector. Send cas- 
settes to NewCity Productions, 635 Madison Ave., 
ste. 1101, NY, NY 10022; (212) 753-1326. 

NEWTON TELEVISION FOUNDATION 

seeks proposals on ongoing basis from ind. produc- 
ers. NTF is nonprofit foundation collaborating w/ 
ind. producers on docs concerning contemporary 
issues. Past works have been broadcast on local & 



54 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



nat'l public TV, won numerous awards & most are 
currently in distribution in educational market. 
Contact NTF for details: 1608 Beacon St., 
Waban, MA 02168; (617) 965-8477; email: 
ntf@tmn.com; walshntf@aol.com. 

OCULAR ARCADE, new on ACTV in 
Columbus, OH, showcases ind. video (art, doc, 
experimental). Send Hi8, VHS, or 3/4" dub to 
Ocular Arcade, D. Master, 135 West 1st Ave., 
Columbus, OH 43201. 

OFFLINE seeks creative & independently pro- 
duced videos. The hr-long show airs biweekly on 
public access channels throughout NY State & 
around the country. Submissions should not 
exceed 20 min. Longer works will be considered 
for serialization. Formats: 3/4", S-VHS, Hi8 or 
VHS. Incl. postage for tape return. OffLine, 203 
Pine Tree Rd., Ithaca, NY 14850; (607) 272-2613; 
email: 72137.3352@compuserve.com. 

THE OTHER SIDE FILM SHOW is looking for 
entries in all cats: narrative, doc, experimental, 
animation, etc. for TV series of ind. films/videos. 
Submissions should be under 30 min. 3/4" video 
preferred, but VHS acceptable. Send w/ SASE for 
tape return to U. of South Florida, Art Dept., 
4202 E. Fowler Ave., Tampa, FL 33620-7350, 
attn: The Other Side. 

OVERWINED PRODUCTIONS, weekly inti- 
mate theater & public access program, seeks con- 
temporary film/video in any format to be show- 
cased in 6k around Detroit area. Contact: Patrick 
Dennis, 2660 Riverside Dr., Trenton, MI, 48183- 
2807; (313) 676-3876. 

PLANET CENTRAL, new LA-based cable sta- 
tion focusing on the environment, global economy 
& holistic health, is looking for stories ideas & 
video footage for new fall alternative weekly news 
program Not in the News. Send info to: Planet 
Central, c/o World TV, 661 1 Santa Monica Blvd., 
Los Angeles, CA 90038; (213) 871-9153; fax: 
469-2193. 

REEL TIME AT P.S. 122, an ongoing quarterly 
screening series, is now accepting submissions of 
recent ind. film & video works for 1996-97 season. 
Exhibition formats include S-8, 16mm, 3/4" & 
VHS. Send VHS submission tapes, written promo 
& return postage to: Curator, Reel Time, PS. 
#122, 150 1st Ave., NY, NY 10009; (212) 477- 
5829 (x327). 

REGISTERED seeks experimental 6k non-narra- 
tive videos about consumerism 6k/or modern ritu- 
al for nationally touring screening. Send VHS for 
preview w/ SASE 6k short description to: 
Registered, attn. Joe Sola, PO Box 1960, Peter 
Stuyvesant Station, NY, NY 10009. 

RIGHTS 6k WRONGS, weekly, nonprofit 
human rights global TV magazine series that 
resumes broadcast in Feb., seeks story ideas 6k 
footage for upcoming season. Last yr 34 programs 
covering issues from China to Guatemala were 
produced. Contact: Danny Schechter or Rory 
O'Connor, exec, producers, The Global Center, 
1600 Broadway, ste. 700, NY, NY 10019; (212) 
246-0202; fax: 2677. 



SHORT FILM 6k VIDEO: All genre 



n, ill-, iru' 



dl- 



THE FILM CRAFT LAB 



-A DIVISION OF ■ 



Grace & Wild msm^s^^ 



Offering exceptional film 

and video services. 

Processing 

Black & White / Color Negative- 
1 6mm & 35mm 

Black & Write / Color Reversal - 
1 6mm & Super 8mm 

Printing 

Black & White / Color Positive- 
16mm & 35mm 

Black & White Reversal- 1 6mm 

Video 

*Tape -to- Film Transfer 
Film-to -Tape Transfer 
Video Duplication 
Standards Conversion 



66 Sibley, Detroit, Michigan 48201 
Phone: [3131 962-2611 
Toll Free: 1[800] 451-6010 

*We offer a two-minute MOS 16mm color demo 
at NO CHARGE from your video tape. 



films 




212.982.2690 
212.982.2685 



T YOUR HANDS 
ON A SMOKIN' 

AVID 



• EXPERIENCED EDITORS. 

•15% DISCOUNT FOR 
INDIE FILMMAKERS!! 

37 FIRST AVEJ 
SUITE 
NEW YORK, NY 1000) 




Video Duplication 



READY NEXT DAY- Mon-Fri 



3/4" U-matic & 1/2" VHS or Beta II Copies 



FROM 3/4", 1/2" VHS MASTER 
FROM ONE 20 MINUTES 30 MINUTES 
MASTER 3/4" 1/2" 3/4" 1/2" 



One Copy $4.00 $4.00 $6.00 $5.00 



Add $25.00 per ONE INCH Master 
60 MINUTES 1/2" VHS/Beta II 

3/4" 1/2" 90 MIN. 120 MIN. 



2-4 Copies 3.50 3.00 
5-9 Copies 3.00 2.50 
10-19 Copies 2.50 2.00 
1-4 RUSH Dubs. $8.00 
TC Burn In $ 10 00 

Window Dubs 5.00 

PRICES ARE PER COPY- STOCK 



5.50 4.50 

4.50 3.50 

4.00 3.00 

$1 1.00 

$14.00 
7.00 



$9.00 $8.00 

8.00 6.00 

7.00 5.00 

6.00 4.50 

$17.00 

$26.00 

13.00 



$11.00 
8.00 
7.00 
6.00 

$22.00 



$14.00 
9.00 
8.00 
7.00 

$28.00 



Inquire for LABELING 
& SHRINK WRAP 



NOT INCLUDED ASSEMBLY CHARGES ARE ADDITIONAL. 



EQUIPMENT: 3/4" Sony, 1/2" Panasonic 2 ch. industrial recorders and Grass 
Valley & Videotek distributors. Time base correction, optional, with Microtime 
and Tektronix equipment. TITLING & EDITING FACILITIES AVAILABLE 

3/4" & 1/2" EDITING Evenings & 24 Hour Access 
With and Without an Editor Instructions Available 
CHYRON TITLER AVAILABLE 
ONE LIGHT FILM TO TAPE TRANSFERS 

FILM STOCK. VIDEO TAPE. AUDIO TAPE. LEADER & SUPPLIES 

"^ (212)475-7884 

814 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK, NY 10003 



March 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 55 




Beta SP to Beta SP 

3/4"SP interformat 

Character Generator 

Hi-8 transfers. Window dubs 

CMX EDL import & export 

24 hour access 

With editor 
S 55/hr 

Yourself 

$ 40/hr 
$ 300/day 
S 150/night 




1123 Broadway, Suite 814 
New York, New York 10010 

212-228-4254 



OFF-LINE 
AVID 4000 
SONY 3/4" 
DUPLICATION 

G€NIX 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK, 10012 
FAX 212 941 5759 



um, 1 min. to 1 hr. Unconventional, signature 
work in VHS or 3/4" for nat'l broadcast! Submit 
to: EDGE TV, 7805 Sunset Blvd., ste. 203, Los 
Angeles, CA 90046. 

THE SPIRIT OF DANCE, live, 1-hr. monthly 
program covering all aspects of dance, seeks 
excerpts under 5 min. from longer works. S-VHS 
preferred. Produced at Cape Cod Comunity 
Television, South Yarmouth, MA. Call producers 
at (508) 4304321, 759-7005; fax: 398-4520. 
Contact: Ken Glazebrook, 656 Depot St., 
Harwich, MA 02645. 

STATEN ISLAND COMMUNITY TELEVI- 
SION PRODUCER seeks experimental works, all 
subjects, by ind. video 6k film artists. The more 
explicit, the better; film & video on 3/4" preferred, 
but 1/2" &/or 8mm acceptable. Send tapes to: 
Matteo Masiello, 140 Redwood Loop, Staten 
Island, NY 10309. 

SUBMISSIONS WANTED for exhibitions/ 
screenings 6k collection of essays considering the 
relationsips between the Middle East 6k the West 
on a personal or geo-political scale. We wil be 
looking at crises of identity, nationalisms/borders, 
naming, gender/sexuality, class 6k the exoticization 
of difference. Send documentation of work in any 
medium, w/ postage if return requested: Public 
Domain, 186 Avenue B, #5, New York, NY 
10009; ph/fax (212) 982-8967. 

TOXIC TELEVISION seeks broadcast-quality, 
creative video shorts (under 10 min.) for alterna- 
tive TV experience. Looking for works in anima- 
tion, puppetry, experimental, computers, etc. Send 
VHS or 3/4" tape 6k resume to: Tom Lenz, 6060 
Windhover Dr., apt. A, Orlando, FL 32819. 

TYME TOWER ENTERTAINMENT seeks fea- 
ture-length 6k short films for Ind. Filmmakers 
video series. 16mm, 35mm, B/W or color. Send 
3/4" or 1/2" VHS copy to Tyme Tower 
Entertainment, c/o Tyme Tower Home Video, 810 
E. Coliseum Blvd., ste. 107, Fort Wayne, IN 
46805-1234; (219) 481-5807. 

UNQUOTE TV, 1/2 hr nonprofit program dedi- 
cated to exposing new, innovative film 6k video 
artists, seeks ind. doc, narrative, experimental, 
performance works under 28 min. Program seen 
on over 40 cable systems nationwide. No payment. 
Submit to: Unquote TV, c/o DUTV, 33rd 6k 
Chestnut Sts., Philadelphia, PA 19104; (215) 895- 
2927. 

URBAN INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPO- 
RARY ARTS is accepting video 6k 16mm film in 
all genres for next season of programming. Fee paid 
if accepted. Send VHS tape w/ SASE to: Film 
Committee, UTICA, 88 Monroe Ave. NW, Grand 
Rapids, MI 49503. 

VIDEO ICON, a new program focusing on inno- 
vative video/film art 6k animation, is currently 
reviewing work. Send VHS or S-VHS copy to: 
Floating Image Productions, 710 Wilshire Blvd., 
ste. 405, Santa Monica, CA 90401; (310) 458- 
4550. 



56 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



VIDEOSPACE AT DECORDOVA MEDIA 
ARTS ARCHIVE: DeCordova Museum & 
Sculpture Park seeks VHS copies of video art & 
documentation of performance, installation art 6k 
new genres from New England artists for inclusion 
in new media arts archive. Send for info & guide- 
lines: Videospace at DeCordova, DeCordova 
Museum, 51 Sandy Pond Rd., Lincoln, MA 01773- 
2600. 

WEIRD TV, satellite TV show airing weekly on 
Telstar 302, specializes in alternative viewing. Will 
consider works of 3 min. max., animation or shorts. 
Submit work to: Weird TV, 1818 W. Victory, 
Glendale, CA 91201; (818) 637-2820. 



Publications 

AEIOU.2 (ALTERNATIVE EXHIBITION 
INFORMATION OF THE UNIVERSE) pro- 
vides descriptions and submission information on 
over 220 alternative exhibition venues, nat'l 6k 
int'l, regularly exhibiting challenging, alternative 
ind. film 6k video. Avail, for $7 (incl. addressed 
mailing label) from AEIOU.2, Film Arts 
Foundation, 346 Ninth St., 2nd fl., San Francisco, 
CA 94103. 

ART ON FILM DATABASE wants to know: 
Have you produced film, video or video disc on 
visual arts? Send info on prod, to Program for Art 
on Film Database, a computer index to over 19,000 
prods on visual arts. Interested in prods on all visu- 
al arts topics 6k welcomes info on prods about 
artists of color 6k multicultural art projects. Send 
info to: Art on Film at Columbia University, 2875 
Broadway, 2nd fl., NY, NY 10025; (212) 854-9570; 
fax: 9577. 

DATABASE 6k DIRECTORY OF LATIN 
AMERICAN FILM 6k VIDEO, organized by Int 
Media Resources Exchange, seeks works by Latin 
American 6k US Latino ind. producers. To include 
work in this resource or for info, contact: Karen 
Ranucci, IMRE, 124 Washington Place, NY, NY 
10014; (212) 463-0108. 

DIRECTORY OF RESEARCH GRANTS 1996, 

providing current information on nearly 6,000 
funding sources, is now available. The volume is 
1,224 pages and costs $135, plus 10% for shipping 
6k handling, as well as sales tax in AZ 6k CA. To 
order, contact: The Oryx Press, 4041 North 
Central Ave., ste. 700, Phoenix, AZ 85012-3397; 
(800) 279-6799. 

FELIX: A JOURNAL OF MEDIA ARTS AND 
COMMUNICATIONS published lx/yr by 
Standby Program 6k Kathy High. Featuring articles 
6k artist pages by established 6k emerging media 
makers, FELIX is dedicated to promoting dialogue 
around video art 6k ind, media. To order subscrip- 
tion or individual issue contact: FEL/X/Standby, 
Box 184, NY, NY 10012-0004; (212) 219-0951; 
fax: 056 5. 

LIBRARY OF AFRICAN CINEMA now 

includes 25 titles from 12 countries representing 22 
directors. Incl. in the 1995-96 guide are new docs, 
new feature films, a controversial South African 
TV series, an anthology of short films 6* a "perfor- 




^D/Vision Pro 2.2 



Digital Non-Linear editing for film and video. Rock solid EDLs for 
negative matchback or on-line video. ABSOLUTE LOWEST RATES 
by the hour, day, week, or by the project. Students Welcome. 

©ROB SQUARED FILMS: 212/580-4169® 

235 WEST END AVENUE, #1 IB, NEW YORK, NY 10023 



HIGH If 

Graphics & Animation 




__^ * "1 


NON-LINEAR EDITING FOR 

FILM • VIDEO • MULTIMEDIA 

SOUND DESIGN • SYNCING * MIXING 

PR0T00LS 


■rave 


EXTENSIVE SAMPLING + SOUND LIBRARY 

BETA SP ACQUISITION + LOCKUP 

CROSS PLATFORM MULTIMEDIA + WEB AUTHORING 


^Trf^ ^zl f f^ 


•* +'+^*S+'+'^' SoHo TELE « FAX 212:925:7759 

brave^ingrees.com 



March 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 57 



mance film." Free copies avail, from California 
Newsreel, 149 Ninth St. #420, San Francisco, CA 
94103; (415) 621-6196; fax: 6522; newsreel® ix.net- 
com.com. 

MEDIA MATTERS, Media Alliance's newsletter, 
provides comprehensive listings of New York area 
events 6k opportunities for media artists. For a free 
copv, call Media Alliance at (212) 560-2919 or visit 
their web site at http://www.mediaalliance.org. 

MED1ANET: A GUIDE TO THE INTERNET 
FOR VIDEO & FILMMAKERS available free at 
http://www.infi.net/~rriddle/medianet.htm, or con- 
W tact rriddle@infi.net. 



Resources • Funds 

BOSTON FILM/VIDEO FOUNDATION seeks 
proposals for fiscal sponsorship from ind. producers. 
No deadline or genre restrictions. Reviewed on an 
ongoing basis. Contact BF/VF for brochure: Cherie 
Martin, 1126 Boylston St., Boston, MA 02215; (617) 
536-1540; fax: 3540; e-mail: bfvf@aol.com. 

CREATIVE PROJECT GRANTS: During this fis- 
cal yr, 8 artists will receive grants for 30 hrs. of subsi- 
dized use of The Media Loft video/computer suite at 
rate of $7.50/hr, in blocks of at least 5-hr segments. 
Grants awarded on ongoing basis to artists doing cre- 
ative, experimental, narrative, language-based, visu- 
al, or conceptual video &/or Amiga computer work. 
Political, promotional, doc & commercial projects are 
not w/in framework of the grant. To apply, send pro- 



ject description, resume, approximate dates of pro- 
posed use & statement of level of video &/or com- 
puter experience to: The Media Loft, 727 Ave. of the 
Americas, NY, NY 10010; (212) 924-4893. 

DCTV ARTISTIN-RESIDENCE is now accepting 
appls for $500 worth of equipment access on ongoing 
basis w/in 1 yr. When 1 funded project is complete, 
DCTV will review appls on file & select next project. 
Pref given to projects already underway. For appl., 
send SASE to: AIR, c/o DCTV, 87 Lafayette St., NY, 
NY 10013-4435. 

ILLINOIS ARTS COUNCIL (IAC) SPECIAL 
ASSISTANCE ARTS PROGRAM: Matching 
grants of up to $1,500 avail, to IL artists for specific 
projects. Activities that may be funded are: registra- 
tion fees & travel to attend conferences, seminars, or 
workshops; consultant fees for resolution of specific 
artistic problem; exhibits, performances, publications, 
screenings; materials, supplies, or services. Funds 
awarded based on quality of work submitted 6k 
impact of proposed project on artist's professional 
development. Appls must be received at least 8 wks. 
prior to project starting date. Degree students are not 
eligible to apply. Call (312) 814-6750. 

INSTITUTE OF NOETIC SCIENCES announces 
a grant of $10,000 through a gift from the Hartley 
Film Foundation for production of a film or video that 
addresses subjects of relevance to Institute interests. 
Deadline: April 1. For info, contact: IONS, 475 Gate 
Five Rd., #300, Sausalito, CA 94965; (415) 331- 
5650. 

LYN BLUMENTHAL MEMORIAL FUND FOR 



IND. VIDEO makes grants in video criticism, 
encouraging innovative 6k thoughtful writing 
relating contemporary video to identity, aesthetics, 
politics, history, popular culture 6k TV. The Fund 
also seeks to publish 6k disseminate essays upon 
completion. Appl. from Lyn Blumenthal Fund for 
Ind. Video, PO Box 3514 Church St. Station, New 
York, NY 10007. Deadline: March 14- 

PACIFIC ISLANDERS IN COMMUNICA- 
TIONS provides grants for development of nat'l 
public TV broadcast programming by 6k about 
indigenous Pacific Islanders. Appls available from 
PIC, 1221 Kapiolani Blvd., #6A-4, Honolulu, HI 
96814; (808) 591-0059; fax 1114; e-mail: pic- 
com@elele .peacesat.hawaii.edu. 

POLLOCK-KRASNER FOUNDATION gives 
financial assistance to artists of recognizable merit 
6k financial need working as mixed-media or 
installation artists. Grants awarded throughout yr., 
$l,000-$30,000. For guidelines, write: Pollock- 
Krasner Foundation, 725 Park Ave., NY, NY 
10021. 

RESIDENCY PROGRAM at the Experimental 
Television Center (ETC) is accepting appls 
Program offers opportunity to study the techniques 
of video image in intensive 5 -day residency pro- 
gram. Artists work on variety of cutting edge 6k hi- 
tech equipment. Program open to experienced 
video artists. Appls must incl. resume 6k project 
description, as well as videotape of recent work (if 
you are a first time applicant) , either 3/4" or VHS 
formats, w/ SASE for return. Write: ETC Ltd., 109 
Lower Fairfield Rd., Newark Valley, NY 13811; 



Synch ronicity 
Sound 

Digital Audio Workstation with 
Video & Film Lock up 

Full Sound Track Preparation & 
Editing 

Dialogue, Effects, Music Editing 
& Sound Design 

Digital Production Recording 

Multi-Format Mixing Facility 

Interformat Sound Transfers 

Overnite T.C. Stripes & Window Dubs 

AIVF Member & Student Discount 

611 Broadway, Cable Bldg., Suite 907 H 
New York, NY 10012 

(212) 254-6694 
Fax: (212) 254-5086 






.iVtflfrlilHilM.liHii 



R,G, Video offers high production value 

to independent projects 

without compromising the quality. 



■ ■■■ ■■ M 



>* Avid on-line, off-fine 

Digitize direct from/ to D-2, 1", BetaSP, Hi-8, VHS 

>- Interformat on-line editing 

wf2 ch. Abekas 3-D digiiale^ts^cfyfon iNFiNiTS 

>- Duplication services available for all formats 

>- Beta SP/Hi-8 camera packages 

Ikegami HL-55A Beta SP, Canon Ll-A Hi-8 

wt or w/o crew 

Call for demo reel 



■I' HUM ■ | | HM I'!I! 




111111111111111111 



R.G. Video 

21 W. 46th Street 

New York, NY 10036 

Tel: (212) 997-1464, Fax: (212) 827-0426 



58 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



(607) 687-4341. 

STANDBY PROGRAM is nonprofit media arts 
organization dedicated to providing artists & 
nonprofit organizations access to broadcast qual' 
ity video post-prod, services at reduced rates. For 
guidelines & appl. contact: The Standby 
Program, Box 184, NY, NY 10012-0004; (212) 
219-0951; fax: 0563. 

TEACHERS MEDIA CENTER is dedicated to 
educators who want to use video technology as a 
learning tool in the classroom. Latest project is 
setting up nat'l and int'l video pen pal exchanges; 
would like to hear from interested schools, indi- 
viduals or organizations. Also interested in creat- 
ing a nat'l network of educators interested in any 
or all aspects of the growing multimedia & media 
literacy movements in education. Contact 
Teachers Media Center, 158 Beach 122nd St., 
Rockaway Beach, NY 11694; (718) 634-3823. 

VISUAL STUDIES WORKSHOP MEDIA 
CENTER in Rochester, NY, accepts proposals on 
ongoing basis for its Media Access program. 
Artists, ind. producers &. nonprofits awarded 
access at reduced rates, prod. &. postprod. equip- 
ment for work on noncommercial projects. For 
appl., tour, or more info, call (716) 442-8676. 



Competitions 

ORAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION accepting 
appls for 1996 awards, given for work published 
or completed between Jan. 1, 1995 & March 30, 
1996. Honorific awards for a published article or 
essay addressing oral history, a completed oral 
history project & to a postsecondary educator 
who has made outstanding use of oral history in 
the classroom. Deadline: Apr. 1. Contact: 
Rebecca Sharpless, executive secretary, Oral 
History Association, Baylor University, PO Box 
97234, Waco, TX 76798-7234; OHA_Support@ 
BayIor.edu. 

PRIMATOLOGY FILM COMPETITION: 

Awarding best films/videos produced since Jan. 
1990, in both commercial & ind. categories. Five 
best in each will be screened at meetings of 
International Primatological Society &. American 
Society of Primatologists. Send 3/4" or 1/2" 
NTSC tape, synopsis, entry fee ($25 non-profes- 
sional, $50 protessional) &. return shipping fee 
($10 US, $25 int'l) by March 1 to Charles 
Weisbard, Box 165, Rockefeller University, 1230 
York Ave., NY, NY 10021-6399. For more infor- 
mation call (718) 274-2365; fax (212) 327-86M; 
weisbac (5 rockvax.iockefeller.edu. 

WRITERS WORKSHOP NATIONAL 
SCRIPTWRITING CONTEST accepting 
scripts from throughout US. 5 to 6 winners will be 
chosen to receive $500 cash award. Winners also 
receive tree tuition for critical evaluation of 
SC riptS before panel of motion picture agents, pro- 
ducers, writers ek directors. Deadline: Ongoing. 
For submission info, send legal size SASE w/ 60tf 
postage to: Willard Rogers, Writers Workshop 
Nation. il Contest, Box 69799, Los Angeles, CA 
90069; (213)933-9232. 



BROADCAST QUALITY 



♦ FILM COMPOSER OPTION (24 FRAMES) 

♦ PROTOOL SOUND EDITING OPTION 

♦ 24 Tracks Video Layering 

♦ 24 Tracks Audio 

♦ 4 Ch. Audio Playback 

♦ Real Time Special Effects & Titles 



SC\ I A D Producti 
V L M l\ 580B'WAY,NYC 



BETACAM-SP ON-LINE 



♦ INTERFORMAT with 3/4" SP, Hi-8, 1/2" 
♦ A/B Roll with Full List Management 
♦ Digital EFX Switcher / Char. Gen. 
♦ DMC Slow Motion / Still Store 
♦ SOHOLoc. /Exp'd Editors 



♦ 3/4", Hi-8, S-VHS, VHS Editing 
♦ XFERS / WINDOW DUBS / DUPS. 

?M 212.925.1110 



NEW YORK 

INTERNATIONAL 

INDEPENDENT 

FILM & VIDEO 

FESTIVAL 



Producers, Managers, Agents, 

Distributors, and Financiers are invited, 

plus Press, Critics, 

and of course, NYC audiences. 



CALL 212.777.7100 

M - F 2pm - (>pm 

Eastern Standard Time 

for applications 



Features, Shorts, Animation, 

Documentaries, 35, 16, Video, 

Multi - Media 



Maverick Distributor 

■ Proudly announces it's 
Spring '96 release 



born white trash, 
going nowhere fast. 

The Gritty Alternative 

film festival award 

winner from Don't Count 

me Out Productions 

writer, director 

Kirk Harris 



Opens In Los Angeles 
April '96 

Bookings & Acquisitions 

The Edge Cinema 

686 s. Arroyo Parkway, 

#202 Pasadena, CA 91105 

P (818) 444-3467 

F (818) 444-0722 

World Sales: CIRCA Ent. 
P: (941) 955-6804 
F^_ ( 9 41) 365-5377 
email: circa legate, net 
http://www.gate.net/-circa 



I _l _J _l _l _l _l _l _l _l _l _l _J _l _J _l 

AFFORDABLE VIDEO SOLUTIONS!! 



THIRD 

WAVE 

MEDIA 

INC 



I 



SONY BETA SP A /B EDITING. TRANSFERS. BUMP 
UPS. WINDOW DUBS. CMX ON LINE MASTERING. 
DYNAMIC MOTION CONTROL. DAT. TOASTER 
FX/CG/3D . NEWTEK VIDEO FLYER NON LINEAR 
EDITING. GREAT LOW RATES! 



IKE / SONY BETACAM SP PACKAGE : $275 . 3 CHIP 
HI-8 SONY VX3 : $75. 3 CHIP S-VHS BR-S411U : 
$175 EXPERIENCED EDITOR AVAILABLE . CALL NOW 
FOR DISCOUNT EDITING PRICES : 212-751-7414 



SWEET 
EAST 60'S 
LOCATION 



March 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 59 



Revolutionary HLM 

SCHOOL 




with Dov S-S Simens 



LOS ANGELES 



If \j on haven't 
Produced , Directed 
or distributed an 
independent feature 
film... 

...You haven't taken 
the 2-Day Film 
School™. 



NEW YOR K 
Mar 9-10 



Mar 23-24 or May 11-12 

WORLD TOUR 

DENVER: Mar 2-3; PHOENIX: Mar 16-17; VANCOUVER: 

Mar 30-31; CHICAGO: Apr 20-21; ATLANTA: Apr 27-28; 

TEXAS: May 4-5; FT. LAUDERDALE: May 18-19; 

WASHINGTON, DC: May 25-26; PHILDELPHIA: Jun 1-2; 

BOSTON: Jun 29-30 

ENROLL! GRADUATE! 



Can't Attend? Can't Wait? 
Audio Film School™ Available 



either only 

$289 



CYBERSPACE FILM SCHOOL" 
http://hollywoodu.com 



HOLLYWOOD 



HFI, PO Box 481252, LA, C A 90048 



800-366-3456 



MS 

INSTITUTE 



The premiere distribution 
cooperative for social 
issue media 

New Day 
Films 

Celebrates 
' ^ Years 

OF CHALLENGING 
Al ID INSPIRING AUDIENCES. 



Seeking energetic independent 

makers of social issue documentaries 

for new membership. 

Call 914.485.8489 



LEACOCK: continued from p. 3 1 

RL: It's what television wants. Television 
should absolutely have what it wants, but I 
think it is a disaster. A lot of people think 
that Happy Mother's Day is a sort of mean 
film. I know a lot of people teach that. But 
we were invited back to screen it in 
Aberdeen, South Dakota, on the thirtieth 
anniversary of the quintuplets' birth. I was 
a little bit nervous about it. We screened 
our version, and we screened the ABC 
version, which is quite different. They love 
ours. 

VL: They laughed. 

RL: People that were in the film. 

IND: Were you being mean, or were you 
being truthful? 

RL: Irony is a better word. It's an ironic 
film. 

IND: When did that ironic point of view 
appear? During the shooting, or did you go 
out there with that attitude? 

RL: No, Joyce Chopra and I went out 
thinking we were just making this for 
money. It [the subject] was the dumbest 
idea I'd heard of. Who cares? We were 
embarrassed. And the more we saw, the 
more embarrassed we became, until in the 
middle of shooting it, we got together with 
Mrs. Fischer and her husband and said we 
will leave you be and just film the things 
that are public — and we did that. Of 
course, we could have been highly princi- 
pled and said no to the whole thing, but we 
weren't about to do that. 

IND: When Leacock-Pennebaker broke 
up, you started teaching. 

RL: 1968. 

IND: Had you taught before? 

RL: Nope 

IND: Did you want to teach? 

RL: There is a God in heaven. Our com- 
pany is going bankrupt, because of the 
idiot businessmen that ruined us. And my 
wife was suing me for something or other; 
separation, divorce, whatever. It was grim. 
Jay Weisner calls up and asked if I'd like to 
teach film at MIT. I'd made some physics 
film for MIT in the early fifties. I came up 
[to Cambridge] with a suitcase. Ed Pincus 
had already started the film school here. 

IND: And you liked teaching? 

RL:No! 



60 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



VL: Yes, you do. 

RL: I do, yes. As long as it's on a small 
scale and nobody takes it seriously. I loved 
MIT The emphasis was on just making 
movies, being filmmakers, doing every- 
thing. Not on teaching people to be 
scriptwriters or directors. 

And the whole Super 8 business. I 
thought maybe if 16mm didn't work, then 
maybe Super 8 would work. I was wrong 
about that. After I'd finished that, Weisner 
said, "Leacock, you've managed to repli- 
cate all the problems of 16mm in 8mm." 
(Laughs) I think he was dead right. 

IND: But during your time at MIT you 
started teaching 16mm and ended up 
teaching Super 8? 

RL: Video 8. As soon as the CCD [Charge 
Coupled Device] was invented, I was 
enormously impressed. One of the first 
things I did with it was film my friend 
Helga Feddersen. We made this film called 
Gott Sei Dank (Thank you, God) about her 
death. 

She was a tremendously popular come- 
dienne on German television. We had 
made a film together years before, and I 
had sort of fallen in love with her. Then I 
found that she was recovering from surgery 
at Boston Eye and Ear for a tumor behind 
her eye. Everybody said she was recover- 
ing, so I believed them. She was very frail 
and I spent a wonderful day with her with 
my first video 8 camera. 

I didn't think I was making a film; I was 
just playing. Then when she died two years 
later, I said, "We should look at this stuff." 
And I realized, in a sense, that she was 
making her last testament to me. It was 
electrifying. And it could never have hap- 
pened with a tripod or a crew and a micro- 
phone boom. The camera was sort of sit- 
ting on my knee with a bug- eye lens and 
she'd reach over and touch me. Then we 
combined it with the film that she and I 
had made together about a little Swiss 
composer who had composed "Oh! Mein 
Papa!" [Sings] Oh Mein Papa ta, ta, ta, ta. 
Famous popular song from the thirties or 
forties. It's a very, very moving film and I 
couldn't possibly have done it with film. It 
just wouldn't have happened. So from 
then on I just stuck with video and loved 
it. 

George Fifield (gwf@tiac.net) is a video 

artist, adjunct media arts curator at the 

DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park, 

and director of VideoSpace, an alternative 

media arts organization in Boston. 



Statement of Ownership 
Management and Circulation 

(Required by 39 U.S.C. 3685) 

1. A. Title of Publication: The Independent Film & 
Video Monthly B. Publication number: 10778918 

2. Date of filing: 2/1/96 

3. Frequency of issue: Monthly 

A. Number of issues published annually: 10 

B. Annual subscription price: $45/individual; 
$25/student; $75/library; $150/business & industry; 
$100/non-profit organization 

4. Complete mailing address of known office of pub- 
lication: 304 Hudson St., 6th fl.. New York, New 
York 10013. 

5. Complete mailing address of the headquarters of 
general business offices of the publisher: 304 Hudson 
St., 6th fl., New York, New York 10013. 

6. Full names and complete mailing address of the 
publisher and editor: Publisher: Ruby Lemer, 304 
Hudson St., 6th fl., New York, New York 10013. 
Editor: Patricia Thomson, 304 Hudson St., 6th fl.. 
New York, New York 10013. Managing Editor: Sue 
Young Wilson, 304 Hudson St., 6th fl.. New York, 
New York 10013. 

7. Owner: The Foundation for Independent Video and 
Film (FIVF), 304 Hudson St., 6th fl.. New York, New 
York 10013. (nonprofit foundation) 

8. None. 

9. For completion by nonprofit organizations autho- 
rized to mail at special rates (DMM Section 424.12 
only). The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of 
this organization and the exempt status for Federal 
income tax purposes has not changed during the pre- 
ceding 12 months. 

10. Extent and nature of circulation: 

A. Total No. Copies (Net Press Run) Average No. 
Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 months: 

1 1,500; Actual no. of Single Issue Published Nearest 
to Filing Date: 13.900. 

B. Paid and/or Requested Circulation I. Sales through 
dealers and carriers, street vendors, and counter sales; 
Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 
months: 5,200. Actual no. of Single Issue Published 
Nearest to Filing Date: 6,372. 2. Mail Subscription 
(Paid and/or requested): Average No. Copies Each 
Issue During Preceding 12 months: 5,000. Actual no. 
of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 
5,001. 

C. Total paid and/or requested circulation [Sum of 
I0BI and I0H2): Average No. Copies Each Issue 
During Preceding 1 2 months: 1 0,200. Actual no. of 
Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 11,373. 

D. Free distribution by Mail, Carrier or other means; 
Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 
months: 500. Actual no. of Single Issue Published 
Nearest to Filing Dale: 1.500. 

E. Total Distribution (Sum of C and D); Average No. 
Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 months: 
10.700. Actual no. ol Single Issue Published Nearest 
to Filing Date: 12.873. 

F. Copies Not Distributed; I. Office use. left 
over.unaccounted. spoiled after printing; Average No. 
Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 months: 300. 
Actual no. of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing 
Date: 397. 2. Return from News Agents; Average No. 
Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 months: 45(1; 
Actual no. of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing 
Date: Not yet avail. 

G. TOTAL I Sum of E, Fl and 2-should equal net 
press run thown in A): Average No. Copies Each 
Issue During Preceding 12 months: 1 1,500; Actual no. 
of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 
13,900, 

111 certify thai the statements in.uk' bj me above are 

correct and complete. 

(Signed) Patricia Thomson. Editor 




276 Babcock St. Boston, MA 02215 
617-254-7882 Phon* - 617-254-7149 Fax 





HIGH END BROADCAST 



N0N LINEAR EDITING 



REAL TIME TRANSITIONS 



FAST WW MACHINE DPR 



HYBRID SYSTEM 



DISK OR TAPE 



18 GIG STORAGE 



LOSSLESS & 3:1 



TO OFFLINE 200:1 



BETACAM SP EDITING 

ANIMATION & GRAPHICS 

DUPLICATION 



(212) 219-9240 
Fax:(212) 966-5618 



GLC 



Productions 

1 1 WEEHAWKEN STREET 
GREENWICH VILLAGE, NY 10014 
TELEPHONE 212-691-1038 
FAX 212-691-6864 



Film/Video 



AVID™ SUITES 




RENTALS OR CREATIVE SERVICES 

■ NON-LINEAR OFF-LINE DIGITAL EDITING 

■ LONG OR SHORT FORMATS 

■ INSTANT ACCESS TO HOURS OF FOOTAGE 



Audio 



3 DIGITAL AUDIO SUITES / 24 TRACK ANALOG 



RENTALS OR CREATIVE SERVICES 

■ SOUND DESIGN / SOUND EDITING / MIXING 

■ adr / sfx / foley 

■ scoring / arranging 

■ live recording 

call 2 1 2-691 -1 038 

FOR BROCHURE / INFORMATION 



GLC FOR POST-PRODUCTION SOLUTIONS 



March 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 61 



theft 



independent 




The ABCs of Media Education 

What is media literacy. 7 How can it be 
integrated into the K-12 curriculum 7 
How can a teacher "grade" media pro- 
jects? Find out in our 24-page reprint 
of The Independent's popular special 
issue, "Media in the Schools." 

Film Schools: A Special Report 

Profiles nine leading film degree pro- 
grams. Also includes an essay on teach- 
ing independent filmmaking values 
within an introductory production 
course; plus coverage of the annual 
National Educational Media Market. 
(August/September 1994) 

To order, send $5 (inch postage & han- 
dling) to: Back Issues, The Independent, 
304 Hudson St., 6th fl., NY, NY 10013. 



CLASSIC 
ANIMATION 
WORKSHOP 



• CLASSIC OXBERRY 

ANIMATION • 

• CLAYMATION • 

• PIXILATION • 

•ROTOSCOPING • 

• CELL ANIMATION • 
Learn concepts of 
story writing, directing, 
cinematography and 
editing as they apply to 
animation. Make your own 
animated films in our 
intensive eight week 
animation workshop. 



Day and evening classes available 



Tuition $2,000. 



NEW YORK FILM ACADEMY 

100 EAST 17TH STREET NYC 10003 
TEL: 212-674-4300 FAX: 212-477-1414 



MEMORANDA: Continued from p. 65 

advance materials; 

• Active participation in one or more commit- 
tees as determined by the organization's needs 
and as requested by the board chair or execu- 
tive director; fulfillment of commitments with- 
in agreed-upon guidelines; 

• General support of the executive director and 
staff as needed. 

Board nominations must be made by current 
AIVF members in good standing; you may 
nominate yourself. Board members must be at 
least 19 years old. To make a nomination, send 
or fax (212/463-8519) the name, address, and 
telephone number of the nominee and nomina- 
tor; we cannot accept nominations over the 
phone. Nominations should be sent to the 
attention of Pamela Calvert. We will also 
accept nominations at the AIVF annual meet- 
ing on April 26. 

MEMBERABILIA 

Criminals, a film by Jeff Butcher and Nelle 
Stokes, will be profiled in the upcoming book 
Persistence of Vision: An Impractical Guide to 
Producing a Feature Film for Under $30,000. The 
film showed at the Twin Cities' Shoestring 
Cinema Festival and the 1994 Independent 
Feature Film Market. 

AIVF member Diane Best was won several 
awards for her half-hour documentary Rights of 
Passage, which tells the stories of four adoles- 
cent girls in societies where women are not val- 
ued. They are the CINE Golden Eagle, the 
Gold Award at the Worldfest-Houston Inter- 
national Film Festival & the Grand Award at 
the American International Film/Video 
Festival. The documentary is being distributed 
by CEN, Filmmakers Library, and Television 
Trust for the Environment. 

Frank Green of San Francisco won the 1995 
Joey Award from the San Jose Film & Video 
Commission for camera work on the documen- 
tary short Headwaters Forest. 

AIVF member Marvin S. Kaplan has been 
elected to the Board of StageSource, Inc. 

Slawomir Grunberg received the Best 
Journalistic Achievement Award at the 
International Ecological Film Festival for 
Chelyabinsk: The Most Contaminated Spot on the 
Planet. 

AIVF members Frances Negron-Muntaner 
and Joe Sola received $1,000 grants from the 
Lyn Blumenthal Memorial Fund for their 
experimental videos. Louis Pepe, a graduate 
student at Temple University, has been named 
Eastman Scholar for the academic year, and 
Kenneth Steward was a finalist. 



MINUTES OF THE 
AIVF/FIVF BOARD OF 
DIRECTORS MEETING 

The board of directors of the Association of 
Independent Video and Filmmakers (AIVF) and 
the Foundation for Independent Video and Film 
(FIVF) met in New York on September 30 and 
October 1, 1995. Attending were Debra 
Zimmerman, Loni Ding, Bart Weiss, Robert 
Richter, Robb Moss, Melissa Burch, Barbara 
Hammer, James Klein, Diane Markrow, Susan 
Wittenberg, and Ruby Lerner (ex officio). 
Absent were Joe Berlinger, James Schamus, and 
Norman Wang. 

Richter nominated Moss for Chair and 
Markrow for Secretary, to serve until the regular 
January 1996 officer elections. 

Board members volunteered for specific tasks 
in the coming year. Hammer will become the 
"point-person" on issues of censorship and disen- 
franchisement and will organize members 
around advocacy issues. Weiss will coordinate 
the production of a clip reel for use in advocacy. 
Moss will investigate the distribution of The 
Independent to U.S. cultural centers worldwide as 
library subscriptions. 

Burch offered to help facilitate the co-spon- 
sorship of regular events with NYC media orga- 
nizations. Klein will more actively connect AIVF 
to the Ohio regional media organization and 
work with staff on student member recruitment. 
Markrow will focus on ways Colorado media- 
makers can interact and connect with makers 
nationally, and will work on distribution initia- 
tives with Wittenberg, who committed to inves- 
tigate ways to develop commercial television 
opportunities for independent work. 

In terms of organizational development, 
Richter will recruit new candidates for the board 
and work to institute a joint membership with 
the Independent Documentary Association. 
Zimmerman will clarify the role of the FIVF 
board and AIVF/FIVF advisors, and will use her 
database expertise to help the organization. 

Executive Director Ruby Lerner reported that 
AIVF has hired a new advocacy associate, Cleo 
Cacoulidis. The MeDIA Consortium has hired a 
staffperson, David LePage, also of the National 
Federation of Community Broadcasters, so 
Cacoulidis will work closely with him to coordi- 
nate efforts. 

Lerner also reported on the National Artists 
Advocacy Group (NAAG), a cooperative effort 
of the National Association of Artists Organi- 
zations (NAAO) and the National Campaign for 
Freedom of Expression (NCFE), to speak on 
issues affecting individual artists. The group's 
intention is to get involved in voter registration 



62 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 



and education on cultural issues. 75,000 names 
have been databased to date, coded by congres- 
sional district. There are also foundations inter- 
ested in funding a feasibility study for a private- 
ly-funded Artists' Endowment as a possible sup- 
plement to the current system of public fund- 
ing. 

Hammer presented information on the 
attempt to defund the San Antonio arts coun- 
cil spearheaded by a gay publisher and based on 
"obscenity" issues relating to that city's Gay 
and Lesbian Film Festival. The board autho- 
rized the president to send a letter in support of 
the arts council, the sponsoring media center, 
and the festival. 

As directed by the board for the second con- 
secutive year, ballots in the 1995 election were 
double-counted to determine if weighted vot- 
ing materially affected the election's outcome. 
The results from both 1994 and 1995 indicate 
that the directors elected remain the same 
regardless of whether votes are weighted or not. 
In light of this consistent outcome, the board 
agreed that no further action would be taken 
regarding weighted voting. 

Zimmerman led a discussion of board com- 
mittees for the next year. The committees and 
their memberships were assigned as follows: 
Executive Committee: Board Chair, President, 
Vice Presidents, Treasurer, Secretary; Advocacy 
Committee: Hammer (Chair), Klein, Ding, 
Wittenberg; Information Services Committee: 
Weiss (Chair), Richter, Zimmerman, Burch; 
Membership Committee: Markrow (Chair), 
Moss. Membership and Information Services 
will meet in a joint committee and separate as 
their work demands. 

Treasurer Robert Richter reported that 
AIVF was in good shape at present, but the 
future is uncertain. The transfer of funds from 
AIVF to FIVF up to a $190,000 maximum was 
approved. The 1995-96 budget was presented 
and passed. 

A board liability insurance proposal was pre- 
sented, but deemed too expensive for immedi- 
ate approval. The board agreed to research pos- 
sible alternatives locally and communicate this 
to Richter, who would report at the next meet- 
ing. 

Future board meetings arc scheduled for: 
January 13-14, April 27-28, and tentatively 
June 22-23. The annual membership meeting 
will be Friday evening, April 26. 



' 




cyo I o p> 



|3ictLJ re 



tel 212 533 0330 ■ fax 212 533 0391 -6111311 szerb@interDort.net 



UPTOWN AVID 



Nort T)oWntortn Ooo! I 



AVID 1000 



AVID 400 



:':"■■":■'■ V'-..; : 







On-line/Off-line 

Beautiful rooms - Low rates 

Pro Tools - 4 channel input/output 

AVR27 

AVID Prices Killing You? Call Code 16: (212) 496-1118 




24 Digital Tracks 



MERCER STREET 

SIMM 

DIGITAL AUDIO 
-PRODUCTION- 

for Film and Video 
and Multimedia 



Sound Design 



Sound Effects 



Voiceover and ADR 



Original Music 



MIDI Room 



Protools/Fairlight/ADAT 



Discount rates for independents 



133 MERCER ST. NYC 10012 • 212.966-6794 • E-mailmercerst@aol.com 



March 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 63 




by Pamela Calvert 



CHECK OUT OUR 
WEB PAGE! 

We've finally done it — we now have a World 
Wide Web address, where you can get up-to- 
the-minute advocacy alerts, selected material 
from The Independent, membership informa- 
tion, and other items of interest. As we become 
more accustomed to this new medium and are 
able to secure sponsorship, you can expect 
announcements of workshops, live chat, and 
other interactive opportunities. We're located 
within the Virtual FilmFestival site. Here's our 
address: http://www.virtualfilm.com/AIVF. 



SPRING EVENTS 

"IN THE WORKS" 
AN OPEN SCREENING PROGRAM 

Responding to popular demand, we have start- 
ed a works-in-progress program for members. 
We'll be combining open screening programs 
with ones featuring invited works, and devel- 
oping it month-by-month to serve the needs 
and interests of the members. The next one is 
scheduled for March 19 at 7:00 p.m. at our 
office. So call membership coordinator Leslie 
Fields to show your work, or come and see 
what's in the pipeline. Four 10-minute slots per 
evening will be assigned on a first-registered, first- 
served basis, and are available to AIVF members 
only. You do not need to register or be a member to 
attend. 

When: Tuesday, March 19, 7:00 p.m. 

Where: AIVF office 

Contact: Leslie Fields, (212) 807-1400 x 222 

MEET AND GREETS 

These are opportunities for members to meet 
producers, distributors, funders, programmers, 
and others to exchange information in an 
informal atmosphere at the AIVF offices. Free; 




open to AIVF members only. Limited to 20 partic- 
ipants. RSVP required. 

FISCAL SPONSORS 

Find out how your production can become eligible 
for grants through nonprofit fiscal sponsorship. 
Representatives of the New York Foundation for 
the Arts, Women Make Movies, Third World 
Newsreel, Millennium, and Media Network 
will provide information on their sponsorship pro- 
grams, project acceptance criteria, services, and 
fees. 
Tuesday, March 5, 6:30 p.m. 

SUSAN GLATZER 

Director of Acquisitions, October Films 

Film distribution company representing indepen- 
dent features in North American markets- 
Thursday, March 14, 6:30 p.m. 

SUSAN WITTENBERG 

Vice-President, Production and Programming, 

Ovation — The Arts Network 

New all-arts cable network with active acquisi- 
tions program. 
Tuesday, April 30, 6:30 p.m. 

COMING UP... 

ADVOCACY MEETING 

Next month AIVF will host a briefing on how 
the current political climate affects indepen- 
dents. Watch the April Independent for details 
or call Lisa Smith at AIVF at (212) 807-1400 
x232. 

ANNUAL AIVF MEMBERSHIP MEETING 

The AIVF annual membership meeting will be 
held Friday evening, April 26, at Anthology 
Film Archives, 32 Second Avenue, NYC. The 
meeting is open to all; AIVF members will 
receive a separate notice in the mail. 



"MANY TO MANY" 
MONTHLY MEMBER SALONS 

This is a monthly opportunity for members to 
discuss work, meet other independents, share 
war stories, and connect with the AIVF com- 
munity across the country. Note: Since our 
copy deadline is two months before the meet- 
ings listed below, be sure to call the local orga- 
nizers to confirm that there have been no last- 
minute changes. 

Austin, TX: 

Call for dates and locations. 
Contact: Ben Davis, (512) 708-1962 

Boston, MA: 

Call for dates and locations 

Contact: Susan Walsh (617) 965-8477 

Brooklyn, NY: 
Call for dates and locations 
Contact: Glenn Francis Frontera, 
(718) 646-7533 

Dallas, TX: 

When: 3rd Wednesday of each month, 7 p.m. 

Where: Call for locations. 

Contact: Bart Weiss, (214) 823-8909 

Kansas City, MO: 

Call for dates and locations 

Contact: Rossana Jeran, (816) 363-2249 

Los Angeles, CA: 

When: 1st Wednesday of each month, 7 p.m. 
Where: Swing Cafe, 8543 Santa Monica Blvd. 
Contact: Pat Branch, (310) 289-8612 

Norwalk, CT: 

Call for dates and locations 

Contact: Guy Perrotta (203) 831-8205 

Portland, OR: 

Call for dates and locations 

Contact: Grace Lee-Park, (503) 284-5085 

Schenectady, NY: 

When: 1st Wednesday of each month, 6 p.m. 

Where: Media Play, Mohawk Mall 



64 THE INDEPENDENT March 1 996 




Contact: Mike Camoin, (518) 895-5269 
March Special Event: Independent producer 
Ralph Arlyck presents a workshop on Media in 
the '90s; Wed., March 20; call for details. 

St. Louis, MO: 

When: 3rd Wednesday of each month, 7 p.m. 
Where: Midtown Arts, 3207 Washington St. 
Contact: Tom Booth, (314) 776-6270 

Washington, DC: 

When: Thursday, March 21, 7:00 p.m.: 

"Marketing"; Monday, April 15, 7:00 p.m.: 

"Video Art" 

Where: Washington Performing Arts, 400 7th 

St. NW (at D St.) 

Contact: Rebecca Crumlish, (202) 328-8355 

TRADE DISCOUNT UPDATE 

Denver's PME Studios now offers members a 
15 percent discount on all 
soundtrack and audio pro- 
duction services, including 
composition, scoring, and 
recording. PME Studios, 
2201 South Cherry Street, 
Denver, CO 80222; (303) 

692-8519. Contact: Craig Patterson. 

NEW IN THE LIBRARY 

We have acquired the new edition of Film 
Arts Foundation's exhibitors' guide AEIOU.2 
(Alternative Exhibition Information of the 
Universe. 2). The guide provides descriptions 
and submission information on more than 
200 independent venues regularly exhibiting 
experimental and alternative media through- 
out the United States and abroad, and 
includes 50 new listings that did not appear in 
the first edition. The book is a key resource 
for independents who are self-distributing 
experimental work. Come to our library and 
look through it; if you are interested in 
acquiring a copy of your own, contact FAF, 
(415) 552-8760. 

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS 

It's time to think about nominations for the 
AIVF board of directors. Board members are 
elected to a three-year term of office; the 
board gathers four times per year in NYC for 
weekend meetings (AIVF pays the travel 
costs if you live elsewhere). 

We have an active board; members must 
be prepared to set aside time to fulfill board 
responsibilities, which include: 

• Attendance at all board meetings and par- 
ticipation in conference calls when necessary; 

• Preparation for meetings by reading 

Continued on /> 6J 



The Foundation for Independent Video and Film (FTVF), the educational affiliate of the Association for 
Independent Video and Filmmakers (ATVF), supports a variety of programs and services for the indepen- 
dent media community, including publication of The Independent, operation of the Festival Bureau, seminars 
and workshops, and an information clearing house. None of this work would be possible without the gen- 
erous support of the ATVF membership and the following organizations: 

The Center for Arts Criticism, Consolidated Edison Company of New York, John D. and Catherine T MacArthur 
Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, National Video Resources, New York City Department of Cultural 
Affairs, New York Community Trust, New York State Council on the Arts, Rockefeller Foundation, and Andy Warhol 
Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. 

We also wish to thank the following individuals and organizational members: 

Benefactors: Patrons: Sponsors: 

Irwin W Young Mary D. Dorman, Karen Freedman, Ralph Arlyck, Coulter 6k Sands, Inc., David W Haas, 

Jeffrey Levy-Hinte, James Schamus, Dr. V Hufhagel/Woman's Cable Network 

Roger Weisberg Julio Riberio, Robert L. Seigel, George C. Stoney 



'; Avid Technology, 



Business/Industry Members: 

Acordia Hogg Robinson, NY, NY Asset Pictures, NY, NY; Avid Technology, Tewksbury, MA; Kelli Barraco, Dallas, 
TX; Blackside Inc., Boston, MA; Blue Yonder Films, Tulsa, OK; C.A. Prod., NY, NY; Jonathan Cohen, NY, NY; Dasistas 
Creative Group, Madison, WI; Douglas, Gorman, Rothacken, NY, NY; Ericson Media Inc., NY, NY; FPG Int'l, NY, NY; 
Fallon, McElligott, Minneapolis, MN; Films Transit, Montreal, Quebec; 40 Acres 6k a Mule, Brooklyn, NY; Fuller Prod., 
NY, NY; Greenwood/Cooper Home Video, Los Angeles, CA; Irivne Pictures, NY, NY; JCV Prod., NY, NY; KJM3 
Entertainment Group, NY, NY; Lonsdale Prod., Glendale, CA; Loose Moon Prod., NY, NY; Joseph M. McCarthy, 
Brooklyn, NY; Media Consultants, Inc., Raleigh, NC; Mikco, NY, NY; On Top Prod., Haverhill, MA; Passporte Prod., 
NY, NY; Real Life Entertainment Inc., LA, CA; Barbara Roberts, NY, NY; Sandbank Films, Hawthorne, NY; Robert L. 
Seigel, Esq., NY, NY; Shurr Prod, Portland, OR; TV 17, Madison, AL; Telluride Film Fest., Telluride, CO; Tribune 
Pictures, NY, NY; Unapix Entert, Inc., NY, NY; Paul Vander Grift, Palm Beach, FL; Video Utah!, Salt Lake City, UT; 
Washington Square Films, NY, NY; Western! Films, NY, NY; White Night Prod., San Diego, CA. 

Nonprofit Members 

ACES Media Arts Cen., New Haven, CT; ACS Network Prod., Washington, DC; AVD Hans Strom Biblioteket, 
Volda, Norway; AVFN Int'l, Anchorage, AK; Access, Houston, TX; Alternate Cunent, NY, NY; The American Cen., 
Paris, FR American Civil Liberties Union, NY, NY; Ann Arbor Community Access TV Ann Arbor, MI; Ann Arbor 
Film Fest., Ann Arbor, MI; Appalshop, Whitesburg, KY; John Armstrong, Brooklyn, NY; Art Matters Inc., NY, NY; The 
Asia Society, NY, NY; Assemblage, NY, NY; Athens Cen. for Film & Video, Athens, OH; Benton Fdn., Washington, 
DC; Black Planet Prod., NY, NY; Blackside, Inc.', Boston, MA; CNC, Washington, DC; Carnegie Inst., Pittsburgh, PA; 
Carved Image Prod., NY, NY; Cen. for Investigative Reporting, San Francisco, CA; Cen. for New American Media, NY, 
STY; Chicago Video Proje^ttfcago, IL; CoeFilm Ass., NY, NY; G)lumbia College, Chicago, IL; Gmmand Gimmun., 
Rye Brook, NY; GimmUBCyfte, Old Westbury, NY; Gimmun. Arts-MHCC, Greshamy, OR Gmmunity Television 
Network, Chicago, IL; Denver Film Society, Denver, CO; Duke Univ., Durham, NC; Dyke TV NY, NY; Eclipse 
G>mmun., Springfield, MA; Educational Video Cen., NY, NY; Edwards Films, Eagle Bridge, NY; Empowerment 
Project/Kasper & Trent, Chapel Hill, NC; Eximus Gmpany, Fort Liuderdale, FL; Fallout Shelter Prod., Mansfield, OH; 
The Film Crew, Wcxxiland Hills, CA; Fox Chapel High School, Pittsburgh, PA; Great Likes Film 6k Video, Milwaukee, 
WI; nVS, St. Paul, MN; Idaho State Univ., Pcxrarello, ID; Image Film Vide. > Cm, Adanta, GA; Int'l Cultural Prgm, NY, 
NY; Int'l Film Seminars, NX NY; Jewish Rim Fest, Berkeley, CA; KPBS, San Diego, CA; Kbmplex Studio Merdeka, 
Selangor, Malaysia; Little City Fdn./Media Arts, Palatine, IL; Ling Bow Group Inc., Bnxiklinc, MA; Manhattan 
Neighhorhixxl Network, NY, NY; Media Arts, Palatine, IL; Media Resource Gntre, Adelaide, Australia; Mesilla Valley 
Film Stxziety, Mesilla, NM; Milestone Entertainment, Irving, TX; Miranda Prod., Boulder, CO; Missoula Gmmunity 
Access, Missoula MT NAMAC, Oakland, CA; NY Inst, of Techri. >l< igy, Old Westhury, NY; Nat. Cen. for Film 6k Video 
Preservation, Lis Angeles, CA, Nut. Latino Community Gmte/KL'H L Lis Angeles, CA; Nat. Video Resources, NY, NY; 
Neighh irh. x xj FilnvVideo Project, Philadelphia, PA; Neon, Inc, NY, NY; New Image PnxJ., Las Vegas, NV; New Liberty 
Prod., Philadelphia PA; Ohio Arts Council, Columbus, OH; I )hi< » Univ., Athens, OH; One Eighty One Prod., NY, NY; 
Outside in July, N1*"N*Y; Pennsylvania State Univ., Univ. Park, PA; Pittsburgh Filmmakers, Pittsburgh, PA; Post Modem 
Pr.xl., Elsah, IL; Pro Vidcogmphers, Muriou Lmnc, IL; Promontory Point Films, Albany, NY; Public Benefit G>rp., 
IVrroit, MI; R.iiiiy States Film Fest., Seattle, WA; Medina Rkh, NY, NY; Paul Robeson Fund/Funding Exchange, NY, 
NY; Ross Film theater, Lincoln, NE; rWGatncy, NY, NY; M'NY Butlalo-IVpt. Media Studies, Buffalo, NY; San 
Francisco Art Inst, San Francisco, CA; Scn.xil offn^^Mnst., Chicago, IL; Scrihe Video Cen., Philadelphia, PA; 
Southwest Alternate Media Projeu, Houston, TX; Squeaky Wheel, Buffalo, NY; Strato Films, Hollywood, CA; 
Sundance Inst^^Muigcles, C/^^^H Inst., NY, NY; Thurston ( ommunin lele\ision Archive Lo \ngeles, CA; 
Irinirv Square Video, Ion into, Ontario, liicson G immunity Gible Grp., Tucson, AZ; UCLA Film 6* Television, 
l Mvmpia, V ,\s UMAftixlkjul of Socvd Work Media t en., Baltimore, MD; Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; Univ. oi 
1 law.in, 1 lon.Julu, HI; Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NL, I m\. of Southern Florida, lampa, FL; Univ. of Wisconsin, 
Milwaukee, Wfc VA Fest. of American Film, Charlottesville, V A. VI. LAV Video, NY, NY; Vancouver Film School, 
Vancouver. W : ; \ent,,^nri, Lk J,, n, \^OataBank,Ch^ 

NY; WTTW/Chicago, ( hicago, IL; W. Hollywood Public Access, West Hollvw.x>d,CA; WexnerCen., Columbus, ( 'I I. 
Women Make Movies, NY, NY; York Univ. Libranes, North York, Ontario. 



March 1 996 THE INDEPENDENT 65 



January 1, 1996 



Independents line up for bargain rates 
at DCTV & Electric Film! 




Downtown Community TV Center 
and Electric Film are located at 
87 Lafayette Street, New York, NY 10013 
fax (212)219-0248 



New York- 
DCTV's free classes 
and low cost equip- 
ment access have 
been attracting huge 
crowds to the histor- 
ic firehouse on 
Lafayette Street. 

When DCTV 

announced almost 
free Avid instruction 
& editing,commun- 
ity producers packed 
the sidewalk trying 
to get into the newly 
renovated building. 

Despite warnings 
from the police, 
Electric Film has 
simultaneously 
opened newly in- 
stalled Avid off-line 
and on-line editing 
suites with res 27 & 
amazing 3D-DVE. 
Interformat suite 
and inexpensive 
Betacam packages 
already make crowd 
control a daily prob- 
lem. People can 
call DCTV at 
1-800-VIDEONY 
or (212)966-4510 
& Electric Film at 
1-800-TAPELESS 
or (212)925-3429. 






APRIL 1996 




W- 1 



77 


i pC 








" 


SB 
HI 


(V 






mm 










Yflur new film project's starting to roll, and you need some 

great' historical images. Don't compromise - call Archive. We may not know exactly what's 

in your head. But with 14,000 hours of footage and 20,000,000 stills, we probably have it. 

Cataloged, copyright-cleared and ready to add authenticity and atmosphere. With thousands of images 

already available in digital form. (After all, finding what you need shouldn't be a whole production.) 






IfiHB 



lHlilllillilli 



*&.: 



* Y 



'^M: 



A 



■l 



irVW 



'; * 



i**;-. 



w* 



"5 2« v 



, § -A ffl. 



*i 



■ an 



Fax us on your letterhead 

for a free brochure and sample reel. 

And check out our on-line databases on 

Footage.net and on CompuServe. 



Your One Call To History: 

800-4GG-0115 



mm. , 

53Q.W. 25th Street, New York, NY 1DD 11 Tel. (212) 62Q-3955 Fax (212) 645-2137 




* Is Proud ^ 

To Have Provided 
Laboratory Services 
* For The 



1996 SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL WINNERS 



"WELCOME TO THE DOLLHOUSE" 

by Todd Solondz 

GRAND JURY PRIZE FOR BEST DRAMATIC FILM 



* TROUBLESOME CREEK: A MIDWESTERN" 

by Jeanne Jordan & Steven Ascher 

* GRAND JURY PRIZE FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY FILM 

AUDIENCE AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY FILM 



"CARE OF THE SPITFIRE GRILL" 

by Lee David Zlotoff 

AUDIENCE AWARD FOR BEST DRAMATIC FILM 



"GIRLS TOWN" 

by Jim McKay 

THE FILMMAKERS TROPHY: DRAMATIC DIVISION 
SPECIAL RECOGNITION FOR COLLABORATION 



"CUTTING LOOSE" 

by Susan Todd & Andrew Young 

THE FILMMAKERS TROPHY: DOCUMENTARY DIVISION 
CINEMATOGRAPHY AWARD: DOCUMENTARY DIVISION 



"BIG NIGHT" 

* by Stanley Tucci & Campbell Scott 

THE WALDO SALT SCREENWRITING AWARD 



DuArt Film and Video 

245 West 55th Street New YORK, NY 10019 212-757-4580 OR 1-800-52-DUART 



theft 



independent 




April 1996 

VOLUME 19, NUMBER 3 

Publisher: Ruby Lerner 

Editor in Chief: Patricia Thomson 

Managing Editor: Sue Young Wilson 

Editorial Assistant: Adam Knee 

Intern: Tomio Geron 

Contributing Editors: Kathryn Bowser, Luke Hones, 

Barbara Bliss Osborn, Robert L. Seigel, Esq. 

Art Director: Daniel Christmas 

Advertising: Laura D. Davis (212) 807-1400x225 

National Distribution: Total Circulation (Manhattan) 

(201) 342-6334; Fine Print (800) 874-7082; Ingram 

Periodicals (800) 627-6247 

Printed in the USA by Lancaster Press 

The Independent Film & Video Monthly (ISSN 0731- 
5198) is published monthly except February and 
September by the Foundation for Independent Video and 
Film (FIVF), a nonprofit, tax-exempt educational founda- 
tion dedicated to the promotion of video and film. 
Subscription to the magazine ($45/yr individual; $25/yr 
student; $75/yr library; $100/yr nonprofit organization; 
$150/yr business/industry) is included in annual mem- 
bership dues paid to the Association of Independent 
Video and Filmmakers (AIVF), the national trade associ- 
ation of individuals involved in independent film and 
video, 304 Hudson St., NY, NY 10013, (212) 807- 
1400; fax: (212) 463-8519; aivffivf® aol.com; http:// 
www.virtualfilm.com/AIVF/ Second Class Postage Paid at 
New York, NY, and at additional mailing offices. POST- 
MASTER: Send address changes to The Independent 
Film & Video Monthly, 304 Hudson St., NY, NY 10013. 

Publication of The Independent is made possible in 
part with public funds from the New York State Council 
on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts, a 
federal agency. 

Publication of any advertisement in The Independent 
does not constitute an endorsement. AIVF/FIVF are not 
responsible for any claims made in an ad. 

Letters to The Independent should be addressed to 
the editor. Letters may be edited for length. 

All contents are copyright of the Foundation for 
Independent Video and Film, Inc. Reprints require writ- 
ten permission and acknowledgement of the article's pre- 
vious appearance in The Independent. The Independent 
is indexed in the Alternative Press Index. 

© Foundation for Independent Video and Film, Inc. 
1996 

AIVF/FIVF staff: Ruby Lerner, executive director; Ellen 
Barker, resource/development director; Cleo Cacoulidis, 
advocacy coordinator; Pamela Calvert, director of pro- 
grams and services; Leslie Fields, membership coordina- 
tor; Judah Friedlander, membership associate; Johnny 
McNair, information services coordinator; Leslie Singer, 
director of administration; Lisa Deanne Smith, 
resource/development associate. 

AIVF/FIVF legal counsel: Robert L. Freedman, Esq., 
Leavy, Rosensweig & Hyman 

AIVF/FIVF Board of Directors: Carroll Parrott Blue, 
Melissa Burch, Loni Ding, Barbara Hammer, Ruby Lerner 
(ex officio), James Klein, Diane Markrow, Robb Moss, 
Robert Richter, James Schamus*, Norman Wang*, 
Barton Weiss, Debra Zimmerman, Susan Wittenberg. 

* FIVF Board of Directors only 



2 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



Features 



26 



Stepping Out: The Art of Publicity 

by Karen Larsen 

Whether you're doing publicity yourself or working with a professional, it helps to plan 
ahead. Publicist Karen Larsen details what's needed to develop, budget, and carry out 
an effective campaign. 




32 Suburbia's Mean Streets: Enter Girls Town 

by Dana Harris 

Improvisational techniques help make Girls Town a particularly effective and disquiet- 
ing look at street-smart high school girls in America. In this interview, director Jim 
McKay and producer Lauren Zalaznick discuss the collaborative process. 



:::;:^^B #: . 


V 


1^ 


s • 



•■r 




edia News 



Overtaxed by IRS Releasing: 
Distribution Division 
Shuts Down 

by Julia Robinson Shimizu 

MoMA Film Library Girdles 
Acquisitions Budget 

by Jerry White 

Good Fellowship: Proving 
the Case for Arts Funding 

by Sue Young Wilson 

Sequels 

Talking Heads 

Rob Epstein & Jeffrey 

Friedman, 

The Celluloid Closet: 

Outing Queer Images 

by Michael Fox 

Jo Andres, Black Kites: 
Diaries from Sarajevo 

BY Laurie Ouellette 

The Institute for Alternative 
Journalism & California 
Working Group, 
Not in Our Town Week: 
Activists Against Hate 

by Susan GERHARD 






Cover; High schoolers Parti and Emma (Lili Taylor, 
front, and Anna Grace) confront the harsh realities of 
teen life in the nineties — including date rape, teen 
pregnancy, and suicide — in Girls Town. 
Courtesy October Films 



i6 Field Reports 

Treasures of the Sierra 
Madre Oriental: 
Mexico's Mixtec Media 

by Christine MacDonald 

Long Range Rovers: 
Media Arts Centers That 
Are Surviving the '90s 

by Mitch Albert 

38 Legal Briefs 

Negotiating the 
Nontheatrical 
Distribution Deal 

by Robert L. Seigel 

40 Books in Brief 

What's New in Black 
American Film Studies 

by Adam Knee 

42 Festivals 

by Kathryn Bowser 

49 Classifieds 
54 Notices 
64 Memoranda 

BY P AMI I \ CALVER1 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 3 



What if . . 



□ Your technical equipment 
broke down in the middle 




□ There's an injury or property 
damage on site? 

□ You're sued for film content, 
unauthorized use, or failure 
to obtain clearance? 

□ What if you're not insured? 




INSURANCE BROKERS 



ENTERTAINMENT/MEDIA INSURANCE SPECIALISTS 

Providing short and long-term coverage when you need it to reshoot, repair, and 

protect your products and time. 

CALL FOR A FREE QUOTE TODAY! 

1-800-638-8791 

7411 Old Branch Avenue, P.O. Box 128, Clinton, MD 20735 



Edited by Sue Young Wilson 



Overtaxed by IRS Releasing 



Distribution Division Struts D 



ow^r~L 




It's been a tough few years for indepen- 

dent distribution. And now another distribu- 
tion outlet has met its demise. 

IRS Releasing, the distribution arm of 
Culver City-based IRS Media, Inc., has sus- 
pended its operations. The decision to close 
down came after then-president Paul 
Colichman left this past November to form 
his own production company. 

Michael Lauer, IRS Media's senior vice 
president of business affairs, explains that IRS 
is no longer producing enough films to justify 
the expense of an in-house distribution unit. 
"The problem with theatrical distribution is 
that it is very overhead-intensive," he says. "If 
you don't have enough product to feed that 
arm of the business, it's just too expensive to 
run." 

IRS Media itself is currently shut down, for 
a restructuring ordered by principal Miles A. 
Copeland. It will return to production by 
spring, but with cutbacks, according to Lauer, 
who adds that the company hopes to contin- 
ue producing two low-budget features a year, 
the same number as in 1994 but a third of its 
output during its heyday in 1993. IRS is 
known for producing arty, high-quality, low- 
grossing films such as Carl Franklin's much- 
lauded 1992 directorial debut, One False 
Move, which had a limited theatrical release; 
The Beans of Egypt, Maine (1994), which 
made $37,000 at the box office; and last 
year's made-for-cable movies (both on 
Showtime), Amanda and the Alien and Dead 
Weekend, which was invited to screen at 
Switzerland's Locarno Film Festival. 

Lauer says that IRS will maintain an active 
commitment to the independent filmmaker 
and will continue to hear pitches. "We have a 
keen interest in working with filmmakers to 
put out quality indie product," he asserts. 

He says there's a possibility that IRS will 
someday regenerate its in-house distribution 
unit. The company's affiliated marketing 




consultants will also remain based in its offices. 
"Those same people will probably continue on 
as a separate entity," Lauer says. "They haven't 
all disappeared." 

Meanwhile, former IRS president Paul 
Colichman's West L. A. -based Regent 
Entertainment, Inc., although so new that at 
presstime it has not yet announced itself in 
detail to the entertainment media, is already in 
production on Twilight of the Golds, based on 
the Broadway play, and a made-for-cable movie 
for Showtime, Menno's Mind. Still very much 
involved in indie distribution, Colichman 
claims he is prepared to fill the gap created by 
IRS Releasing's demise by reaching out to inde- 
pendent filmmakers: "We're always interested, 
always looking." 

Julia Robinson Shimizu 

]ulia Robinson Shimizu is a former film actor and 
a freelance writer tn Los Angeles. 



MoMA Film Library Girdles 
Acquisitions Budget 

It's been argued that film history has been 
defined by what's available from the Museum of 
Modern Art's Circulating Film Library in New 
York. Certainly, the library's scholars and cura- 
tors have painted a picture of the medium with 
a broader brush than almost any other such 
group. Now, however, the library is scaling 
back, trying to trim its sails to safely navigate 
the lean, mean, and video-obsessed modern 
age. 

"Rumors of our demise are greatly exaggerat- 
ed," quips curator William Sloan, but he leaves 
little doubt that, in light ol a decrease in its 
operating budget this year ol more than 20 per- 
cent, the Library must reevaluate its mission and 
cut its spending. 

And one thing it will no longer be able to 
afford is to m, ike acquisition o( new indepen- 
dents a priority. "We're going hack to our root- 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 5 




We do it all, from A to 2. 

• Post-production • Duplication 

• Customization • Distribution 



From editing to broadcast and high volume VHS duplication 

to distribution - whatever your needs, Video Dub does it for you! 

So call us today, and get the whole job done. 




mm 



VIDEO DUB INC. 



423 West 55th Street, New York, NY 10019 (212) 757-3300 
235 Pegasus Avenue, Northvale, NJ 07647 (201) 767-7077 

A Video Services Corporation Company 

1-800-88-DUB-IT 




Facing a 20 percent budget cut, MoMA's Circulating Film Library has stopped acquiring work by new directors. It's 
also no longer able to rent its collection of Andy Warhol movies, including Chelsea Girls (pictured). 

Courtesy MoMA Circulating Film & Video Library 



again. ..and building up the early cinema. ..the 
heart of the collection," Sloan says. "[But] 
we aren't going out looking for new filmmak- 
ers." 

The curator of the library since 1981, 
Sloan recalls happier days for acquisitions. 
The library collected many independent films 
of the fifties and sixties, such as Lionel 
Rogosin's On the Bowery (1956) and Come 
Back Africa (1960) and Robert Kramer's The 
Edge (1967), Ice (1969), and Milestones 
(1975). In recent years, it has acquired works 
by contemporary independents such as Ernie 
Gehr, Suzan Pitt, Alan Berliner, and Joanna 
Priestley. 

The library's film booker, Marilyn 
Mancino, recalls how "in the eighties. ..we 
would take on [a filmmaker's] entire body of 
work, even though many of the films don't go 
out." Sloan says that they now "just don't 
have [the] luxury" of such an ambitious 
acquisition policy. 

According to Mancino, all contracts with 
filmmakers are being re-negotiated, with the 
museum asking for a higher share of rental 
income even from independents ("We're 
making everybody equal," Mancino says) in 
return for handling some lab costs. Another 
sign of tough times: Although Sloan is actu- 
ally retired, no replacement for him has been 
hired, so he continues to come in three days 
per week on a volunteer basis. 

The library has always had to pay its own 
day-to-day expenses, "everything from 
salaries to office supplies," according to the 
library's financial specialist, Kitty Geary. 
While some grants given to the museum's 
department of him (of which the library is a 



program) include some money for specific 
library projects, the department does not 
actively solicit grants specifically for print cir- 
culation. "Their main focus is on preservation," 
Cleary says. "We're definitely not at the top of 
the priority list." 

And the library is having more trouble mak- 
ing independent work pay for itself, Sloan says, 
noting that its former bread and butter was "an 
academic audience" and that the academic 
study of film is currently undergoing much fluc- 
tuation. And, as distributors frequently gripe, 
universities are increasingly using video rather 
than 16mm film, while the library is almost 
entirely 16mm, with a few 35mm prints. 
"Sixteen-millimeter distribution has totally 
changed in the nineties," says Mancino. 
"Universities no longer have the facilities or the 
technicians to deal with sixteen-millimeter 
film. We haven't kept up with the times." Sloan 
also notes that it can take a long time for a 
teacher to become comfortable enough with 
new work to want to rent it regularly. 

Nonetheless, the library has been a terrific 
source of material for broad-minded teachers, 
and many regret the belt-tightening. "There are 
films that are not available except at MoMA," 
says David Tafler, a member of the communica- 
tions faculty at Muhlenberg College in 
Allentown, Penn. "[Library staff] are extremely 
helpful, and [the] prices are reasonable." Tifler 
cites the films of Kenneth Anger, such as 
Rabbit's Moon, as among those he has been able 
to rent only at MoMA. "I think that some of 
the earlier versions of those films are superior to 
the later ones that have been re-edited, and [at 
MoMA] you have the option of renting the 
early version or the more recent version," he 



says. "That kind of archiving is just fantastic." 
The decision of the Andy Warhol 
Foundation to pull all of the late artist's films 
from circulation was also a serious blow to the 
library. While there has been no decision as to 
the films' ultimate fate, since July the library 
has been under instructions not to let them 
out, says Mancino. It previously distributed 
Empire, Blow Job, Eat, Kiss, Sleep, and others 
and made considerable money from the rentals. 
On a brighter note, however, another part of 
the museum's film department — its 12,000-film 
archive — is being moved to a brand-new film 
preservation center, a $12 million facility in 
northeastern Pennsylvania slated for comple- 
tion this summer. The project was funded in 
part by an $800,000 Challenge Grant from the 

National Endowment for the Arts. 

Jerry White 

Jerry White is on the program staff of the Neighborhood 

Film/Video Project and the Philadelphia Festival of 

World Cinema. 



Good Fellowship: 

Proving the Case for Arts 

Funding 

Spurred on by the major cuts in state and fed- 
eral funding for the media arts and politicians' 
clear lack of understanding, in particular, of the 
function and value of small, regional grants, 
two Philadelphia media artists recently decided 
to carry out the first comprehensive survey of 
how one such grant program has helped its 
winners. 

The Mid Atlantic Regional Media Arts 
Fellowship Program (MARMAF) was an 
National Endowment for the Arts regional 
regrant program that from 1983 to 1994 served 
Ohio, Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, 
New Jersey, Delaware, and Washington, D.C. 
When the program fell victim to funding cuts 
two years ago, two winners of past grants, 
Karen Lefkovitz, a member of the Termite TV 
Collective, and Margie Strosser, a freelance 
producer/director and former program director 
for Pittsburgh Filmmakers, decided to conduct 
a postmortem. 

They sent postcards with their questions to 
all 130 grant winners (61% responded), have 
conducted five in-depth telephone surveys, and 
plan at least five more phone sessions. 

"Looking at the survey numbers, we can see 
thai the funded projects are being finished. 
And without the grants, they wouldn't be," 
LefkovitZ and Strosser write in their prelum n.ir. 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 7 



MUSIC CENTRAL 

is proud to announce 

the first record label 

devoted exclusively to 

documentary soundtracks: 




A division of Music Central, Inc. 
Distributed nationally by: 



QAf*" l, n£ 



If you are an independent 
filmmaker, call Robert Fish 
at (212) 840-3285 to discuss 

how Music Central and 

Docutrax can serve all your 

music and soundtrack needs. 




ihXQ 



music: c f. n t r a l 



260 WEST 39TH STREET, 18TH FLOOR 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10018 
2 12«840«3285/FAX:2 12»840»3923 



•Total MARMAF grants (198.3 - 
1994): 319 

•Total number of grant recipients (may 
have received multiple grants): 

130 
•Total amount awarded (1983-1994): 

$1,061,825. 

• Average size of each grant: 

$3,328.60 

• Was the project completed? 

Y 70% N 12.5% 
(17.5% still in progress) 

• Would you have been able to do the 
project without the grant? 

Y 17% N 83% 

• Did the grant enable you to get other 
funding for the project? 

Y 66% N 34% 

• Did receiving the grant create oppor- 
tunities to do other work beyond this 
project? 

Y 75% N 25% 

• Was this piece as widely seen as 
intended? 

Y 67% N 33% 



analysis. "All of those interviewed stressed the 
importance of 'seed money.' Especially for 
young artists starting out, these small grants 
(most within a $1,000 to $6,000 range) were a 
significant boost, financially and psychological- 

ly. 

"[T]he grant was rarely enough money to 
complete a project. 'Its greatest value was at the 
starting level,' says one artist interviewed by 
phone. 'More than anything, it was a morale 
booster. And you can't put a price tag on that.'" 
But many survey respondents secured addi- 
tional funding after receiving the MARMAF 
grant, in some instances as a direct result. "One 
artist, for example, was able to get a private 
donor to match the amount of his award. Many 
people used the completed work as a submis- 
sion sample for grants they received for other 
projects. Most respondents felt that the project 
created other opportunities for them, as well as 
the people working with them, to make more 
media art work. Surprisingly to us, most respon- 
dents felt that the funded work was viewed as 
much or more than they had intended, often 
outside the region, and in many instances, out- 
side the U.S. 

"In a field where it is difficult to establish 



SEQUELS 



On February 8, President Clinton signed into 
law a new telecommunications bill that 
makes sweeping changes to the country's 
telecommunications laws, tearing down 
historic barriers between the local and long- 
distance telephone, cable, and broadcast 
industries while mandating various kinds of 
censorship of cyberspace, television, and 
cable. 

The bill includes a measure making it a 
crime, punishable by up to five years' impris- 
onment or fines up to $250,000, to knowing- 
ly make "indecent" material available to 
minors over the Internet [see "No Sex 
Please: Congress and the Courts Threaten 
Censorship of Cable Access, Internet," 
December 1995]. It also contains language, 
added in Congress by Rep. 
Henry J. Hyde (R-IL.) 
that apparently makes it 
illegal to discuss abor- 
tion over the Internet. 

The restrictions have 
provoked widespread 
protest from civil lib 
erties and media 
watchdog groups 
and Internet 

habitues. Imme- 
diately after the 
President signed the 




legitimacy and reputations are built through 
cumulative steps, the [grant] program had 
overwhelmgly positive effects for the artists 
surveyed. The sheer amount of work com- 
pleted, as well as the extent to which it was 
viewed, suggests a high rate of return on the 
NEA's investment in this program. We won- 
der why was it so easy for the NEA to wipe 
out a granting structure that was so success- 
ful." 

The report, which its authors hope will be 
used by community and national media 
groups to save regional management of other 
small-project funds, will be available in its 
final form from the Pennsylvania Council on 
the Arts in Harrisburg. 

For more information on the report, con- 
tact Margie Strosser at (215) 849-3867 or 
mstrosser@aol.com; or Karen Lefkovitz at 
kdurga@cpcn.com. 

Sue Young Wilson 

Sue Young Wilson is the managing editor of The 
Independent. 



8 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



bill, the American Civil Liberties Union and 
other groups filed lawsuits challenging the pro- 
visions in court. 

The bill also requires television manufactur- 
ers to install computer chips — the so-called "V- 
Chips" — in all new TV sets to allow parents to 
block out violent and other unwanted pro- 
gramming. Broadcasters and cable companies 
must devise a ratings system to reflect the 
amount of violence and sex in their programs; 
if they do not, a commission to be appointed by 
the President must do so. 

A small victory for the public interest: the 
bill does contain provisions that protect public, 
educational, and governmental (PEG) access 
on future "open video systems" operated by 
phone companies, in the same way they are 
currently guaranteed access on cable systems. 

Also, the Supreme Court has agreed to 
review a recent ruling by the D.C. Court of 
Appeals that cable operators may censor public 
access programs that contain "obscene or sexu- 
ally explicit material," without violating the 
First Amendment. The ACLU and several 
media watchdog groups, outraged at the D.C. 
appeals court's decision, petitioned the 
Supreme Court for the review. 

• 
Four filmmakers have been named the first win- 
ners of awards from the Minnesota Block- 
buster Film Fund, a program created by the 
video rental chain's local franchise -holders to 
support work by local independents by granting 
them interest-free loans ["Blockbuster Offers 
Funds to Minnesota Makers," May, 1995]. 

Orginally, there were to be three $25,000 
loans awarded in 1995. But plans changed a lit- 
tle during the selection of the first set of win- 
ners this past fall. After more than 70 applica- 
tions were reviewed and 10 finalists 
announced, the three final-round judges — 
Mark Lipson, co-producer of The Thin Blue 
Line, Marcus Hu of Strand Releasing, and Mary 
Jane Skalski of the New York-based production 
company Good Machine — couldn't narrow 
their choices to tewer than four. With the kind 
of common sense and equity common to 
Midwesterners, the hind's administrators set- 
tled the problem by reconfiguring the aware 
and presented $18,750 loans to each of those 
tour. 

1 he awards, all tor narrative proposals, went 
to Wendell Jon Andersson to make With or 



In protest of the Telecom Bill's sanctions against "indecen- 
cy" on the Internet, the image of a blue ribbon appeared on 
many Web sites the day President Clinton signed the bill. 



/ei/LnAVID 



(212)228-7748 



296 Elizabeth Street, Suite bf 

New York, N.Y. 

10012 

AVID & D/Vision suites 

at reasonable prices 

&fi.„AVID is an HM Rifken Productions,lnc. Co. CALL ABOUT Beta SP Camera packages (IKE-57!) and crews 



Lynn Hershman 
Laurel Chiten 
Jane Gillooly 




Tape-to-Film Transfers . . 

Call the Film Craft Lab. OurTeledyne CTR-3 uses 
high grade precision optics and is pin-registered for 
a rock steady transfer and superior results. 
A few of our satisfied clients include: 



"Virtual Love" 
"Twitch and Shout" 
"Leona's Sister Gerri" 



We offer a two-minute MOS 16mm color demo at no charge 
from your videotape. 

For Exceptional 

Processing & Printing . . . 

We've been processing and printing motion picture film for over 
25 years, so we understand the challenges of the independent 
filmmaker. We're a full-service film laboratory and one of the 
few labs that still processes black & white film. For professional 
lab services, call us first. 

• Daily Processing 

• Black & White Processing & Printing - 16mm & 35mm 

• Color Processing & Printing - 16mm & 35mm 

• Black & White/Color Reversal Processing & Printing 

• Camera Raw Stocks 

• Rank/da Vinci Film-to-Tape Transfers 

• Video Duplication 



THE FILM CRAFT LAB 

A DIVISION OF 

Grace & Wild ^^eheh 



April 1996 TH E I N DE PEN DENT 9 



"In making Picture Bride, 
we turned many times to 
AIVF/FIVF publications for 
the facts on fundraising, 
production and distribution. 
Their books are up-to-date, 
well organized and accessible. 
Best of all, it's getting the 41 1 
without the schmooze!" 
Kayo Hntta — 
"Picture Bride", winner of 
The Audience Award, 
Sundance Film Festival, 1995 

"The new AIVF/FIVF books 
are a great one-stop course in 
independent film distribution. 
Keep your film's release story 
from being one of hex, lies & 
videotape — or living in 
oblivion." 

Whit Stillman — "Barcelona" 
& "Metropolitan" 



CHLL NOW 

[SIS] 807-1400 

Or write: AIVF/FIVF 

304 HUDSON STREET, 6th Fl, 

NEW YORK, NY 10013 

Shipping and handling: 

Domestic - $3.50 for the 

first book, $ 1 .00 for each 

additional book. 

Foreign - $5.00 for the first 

book, $ 1 .50 for each 

additional book. 

VISA and Mastercard 

Accepted 



OF 3 GREAT RESOURCE 
BOOKS FROM AIVF/FIVF 

ORDER TODAY - SUPPLIES ARE LIMITED ! 



AIVF/FIVF GUIDE TO INTERNATIONAL FILM & VIDEO FESTIVALS 

edited by Kathryn Bowser 

$34.95/$29.95 AIVF members. Plus shipping and handling. 

The 4th edition of FIVF's best seller is a completely indexed and easy-to-read 

compendium of over 400 international film and video festivals, with contact 

information, entry regulations, dates and deadlines, categories, accepted formats, 

and much more. The festival guide includes information on all types of festivals: 

small and large, specialized and general, domestic and foreign. 



AIVF/FIVF GUIDE TO FILM & VIDEO DISTRIBUTORS 

edited by Kathryn Bowser 

$24.95/$ 1 9.95 AIVF members. Plus shipping and handling. 

A must-read for independent film and video makers searching for the right 

distributor.The distributors' guide presents handy profiles of 1 50 commercial and 

nonprofit distributors, practical information and company statistics on the type of 

work handled, primary markets, relations with producers, marketing and 

promotion, foreign distribution and contacts. Fully indexed. This is the best 

compendium of distribution information especially tailored for independent 

producers available. 

THE NEXT STEP: DISTRIBUTING INDEPENDENT FILMS AND VIDEOS 

edited by Morrie Warshawski 

$24.95/$ 1 9.95 AIVF members. Plus shipping and handling. 
Leading professionals in the field answer frequently asked questions on 
distribution. Learn more about finding a distributor from Debra Zimmerman 
(Women Make Movies), self-distribution from Joe Berlinger (producer/director 
of Brother's Keeper), foreign distribution from Nancy Walzog (Tapestry 
International) and theatrical distribution from David Rosen (author of Off 
Hollywood). Plus find out about promotion; public broadcasting, cable and home 
video markets; non-theatrical distribution; contracts and much, much more. 
A bibliography provides additional readings on selected topics. This is a prime 
source of practical insights into the whole distribution process. 



SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL 

SAVE OVER 25%— ORDER ALL THREE BOOKS AND PAY ONLY $59.95 Plus shipping and handling. 
Join now as an AIVF member at the DISCOUNTED rate of $40.00 for I year! 

Both of these SPECIALS expire April 30, 1996 




Without You, about a couple putting their 
child up for adoption; to Blue Kraning for 
Tooth and Nail, which follows a man's search 
for redemption in Michigan's North Woods; 
to Julia Rask for Blue Earth, based on a St. 
Paul newspaper's series of articles called 
"AIDS in the Heartland"; and to Paul Zehrer 
for The Threshold, a road movie that will 
wind its way through the wide-open land- 
scapes of Colorado, Utah, North Dakota, 
Minnesota, and Illinois. 

Since award winners are only required to 
repay their loans if they obtain full financing 
for their proposed projects and enter produc- 
tion, the applicants were judged on the 
strength of their financial plans and apparent 
determination to see their proposals through, 
as well as on the creative merits of their sub- 
missions. "It became clear to the panelists 
that these people really wanted to make their 
films, and they were going to do whatever it 
took to make them," says fund administrator 
Christine Walker. She adds, "When you're 
located here in Minnesota, you have to have 
that kind of drive and determination to get a 
film done." 

Some of the first recipients have already 
seen progress on their projects start to snow- 
ball as a result of the awards. Within two 
months of last November's announcements, 
two ot the winners were approached by pri- 
vate investors. 

"I think there are people in town who 
were just waiting tor any films to he identi- 
fied as potential prospects," says Walker. "I'm 
not saying a lot of people, but a couple of 
very serious ones are coming forward." 

Andersson attended the Sundance 
Screenwriters Workshop alter being reconv 



Blockbuster Award-winning writer/director Paul Zehrer 
works with Melora Griff is on a scene from his earlier film, 
blessing. 

Courtesy Starr Valley Films 

mended by a Blockbuster judge and received 
some expressions of interest in With or Without 
You from Dreamworks SKG and Robert 
Redford's production company. Although the 
Blockbuster fund is designed to push projects 
toward completion, Kraning actually scrapped 
plans to shoot his film last winter once he 
received his award. The sudden boost in 
finances and recognition, he explained, afford- 
ed him a chance to spend more time on script 
development and pursue relationships with 
potential hinders and distributors. 

The future of the film fund itself has become 
uncertain, however. The individual responsible 
for setting up the fund, Mike Sweeney, then 
president of the state's Blockbuster franchise, 
left the company last summer, and franchise 
ownership shifted to parent company 
Blockbuster Entertainment. Although the orig- 
inal three-year film fund commitment is still 
guaranteed, support beyond that is uncertain. 
Last year's $150,000 contribution from the 
McKnight Foundation was a positive sign that 
led to the renaming of the program as the 
Minnesota Blockbuster-McKnight bund. 
Ideally, the current crop of Blockbuster winners 
will succeed in entering production and help 
replenish the program by repaying their loans. 

Applications for the 1996 Blockbuster' 
McKnight awards are due May 1. Guidelines 
can be obtained by contacting IFP North at 
(612) 338-0871. 

Scott Brk .< is 

Scotl Briggs in a videomaker who also u rites about art 
and culture m the Minneapolis-St. Paul area. 




Hi8 Drops Out! 
Beta Takes Notice. 

ESPI Backs New Format: 



Mini 



IX T 



Affordable, high quality digital 
tape arrives and "it's a winner!" 
ESPI responds quickly , offering 
Sony's 3-chip VX-1000, a truly 
amazing consumer camcorder 
with professional capabilities. 
Solstein issues statement, "We 
are bumping up Mini DV and 
DVCPRO to BetaSP in full 
component and to Digital Beta 
in 4:2:2. The paradigm shift is 
happening now - don't blink, 
stay tuned." 



We accept all major credit cards 
and can provide insurance. 




PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

1 5 West 26th Street 

NYC. NY 10010 

212 481-ESPI (3774] 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 11 




T 

ROB EPSTEIN & 

JEFFREY FRIEDMAN 

the celluloid closet 

OUTING QUEER BAAA«3ES 

By Michael Fox 




If, as everyone believes, winning an Oscar 
automatically opens studio checkbooks and 
bank vaults, Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman 
would have slam- dunked The Celluloid Closet 
years ago. To all appearances, their adaptation 
of the late Vito Russo's groundbreaking 1981 
book examining Hollywood's skewed portrayal 
of gays and lesbians in mainstream movies was 
a dunk, with the studios providing more than 
100 film clips and Sony Pictures Classics snap- 
ping the film up for distribution almost imme- 
diately after its rip-roaring Toronto Film 
Festival premiere. But this success didn't come 
easy. In fact, the award-winning San Francisco 
filmmakers had to augment their initial seed 



funding from the U.K.'s Channel 4 with, of all 
things, direct mail solicitations. 

"Richard Schmiechen and I had done a 
direct mail campaign on The Times of Harvey 
Milk on a much smaller scale," Epstein explains 
over bagels in the kitchen of the duo's Castro 
District house. "On that project we netted 
$15-20,000 with mostly local mailing lists, 
because outside of San Francisco people didn't 
know who [gay San Francisco city supervisor] 
Harvey Milk was." But it was enough to keep 
the project going. On this film we did it on a 
much grander scale: a trial that was very suc- 
cessful and a second run to half a million peo- 
ple." 

"We were in an awkward place at the begin- 
ning," Friedman recalls, "because without 
knowing whether we could get the rights to the 
clips, we didn't want to take money, especially 
from the [gay and lesbian] community. That 
first infusion of Channel 4 money allowed us to 
determine that we would indeed be able to get 
the rights to the clips." 

The torrent of individual donations netted 
somewhere north of $60,000 — enough to sus- 
tain production for a year while Friedman and 
Epstein pursued additional funding from 
Channel 4, ZDF/Arte, and the Corporation for 
Public Broadcasting. However, the filmmakers 
were ultimately disappointed by CPB, which 
had consistently shown enthusiasm about the 
film from the beginning. 

"The argument that we ended up having 
with them was over one particular scene, from 
Red River, where Montgomery Clift and John 
Ireland are comparing guns," Epstein recounts. 
"They said we had no foundation to claim 
homoerotic subtext. That became the defini- 
tive example of what our film was about, and 
they basically said our thesis wasn't sound." 
Friedman adds: "It was also clear from the 
materials that we gave them that our approach 
was going to be entertaining, and I think that 
disturbed them." 

With the filmmakers running out of options, 
Lily Tomlin, who narrated the film, made a call 
to Michael Fuchs, then head of HBO. Eight 
minutes into a one -hour meeting, Fuchs green- 
lighted the film for HBO, which in 1989 had 
fully financed Common Threads, the duo's 
Academy Award-winning documentary on the 
AIDS quilt. 

The currency of Hollywood contacts also 
proved crucial in licensing the 120 mainstream 
movie clips that Epstein and Friedman chose 
for the film. Brillstein-Grey producer Howard 
Rosenman (Father of the Bride) , whom the film- 



makers had previously enlisted as executive 
producer of Common Threads, called all the 
studio heads directly to obtain their support 
for the project. Once the honchos gave their 
blessings to release the vintage footage, the 
filmmakers had entree to negotiate the legal 
details with studio functionaries. 

Since credits are almost as valuable as 
cash in Hollywood, Bernie Brillstein and 
Brad Grey share executive producer credit 
with Rosenman. "Brillstein and Grey we've 
never met," Epstein laughs. "They did 
absolutely nothing on the film. They are 
phantom people, as far as we know." 
Friedman chuckles, then explains: "They 
paid Howard's salary while he was working 
on the film." 

One of the toughest decisions that Epstein 
and Friedman faced — in addition to the per- 
petually difficult choice of which scenes to 
cull from nearly a century of Hollywood 
movies — was how to acknowledge the recent 
explosion of independent gay and lesbian 
filmmaking. "We had a whole sequence on 
new queer cinema at the end," Friedman 
says, "but we were never able to make it feel 
like it was part of the movie. It always felt like 
'PS.: Independent cinema.'" Epstein concurs: 
"There probably would have been a percent- 
age of the audience that would have valued 
that and appreciated it, but ultimately it 
made for a more unwieldy film, and our ten- 
dency as filmmakers is to try to make pretty 
tight narrative documentaries." They ended 
up collapsing the footage into a montage that 
is, in Friedman's words, "Sort of our hopeful 
nod to the future." 

The filmmakers joke that all the clips that 
were cut out of the two -and-a-half- hour 
rough cut will find their way into The 
Celluloid Closet CD-ROM. It's not exactly 
around the corner, but a multimedia project 
is in the works. 

Of course, Vito Russo never envisioned 
CD-ROMs in 1986, when he informally 
agreed to allow Friedman and Epstein to film 
his book. It wasn't until after Russo died of an 
AIDS -related illness in 1991 that the film- 
makers cleared the paperwork with his estate 
and officially acquired the rights. 

But as The Celluloid Closet segued from 
preproduction into production, it quickly 
evolved from Russo's book into Epstein and 
Friedman's film. "We used Vito's book to 
write our initial treatments," Friedman says, 
"and to find the clips and what the analysis 
was going to be. We used it as a jumping-off 



12 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



point. But once we started shooting inter- 
views and editing, I feel that it became our 
film. The interviews took us off into direc- 
tions that we hadn't anticipated." 

Telling Pictures, 121 Ninth St., San 
Francisco, CA 94103; (415) 864-6714; fax: 
864-4364. 

Michael Fox is a San Francisco-based freelance 

writer. His last piece for The Independent was 

an interview with Craig Baldwin in the 

December 1995 issue. 



blaclc Idtes 

DIARIES FROM SARAJEVO 

By Laurie Ouellette 
"There are two strong feelings at this 

time. . . one is to make a fight for survival, 
and the other is to die," says Alma, the 
female narrator of Black Kites, Jo Andres's 
26-minute experimental film about the 1992 
siege of Sarajevo. In sharp contrast to the 
fleeting images of soldiers, burned-out build- 
ings, and anonymous casualties shown on 
U.S. television, Andres focuses on the interi- 
or spaces of one woman's psyche when she is 
forced to live, along with her family and 
friends from an art collective, in the base- 
ment of an abandoned theater. 

With shocking banality, Alma speaks of 
her everyday hurdles — burning sets and the 
parquet floor for fuel; learning to wash dishes 
with dirt in the absence of water. These ver- 
bal pictures are juxtaposed with descriptions 
of her emotional trauma and fear of death 
and loss. Andres succeeds in humanizing the 
effects of the atrocities at the most personal, 
basic level. "I wanted to create an awareness 
of what trauma feels like without distancing 
the viewer," says the Brooklyn-based film- 
maker. "I wanted to deliver that feeling with- 
out delivering guilt, or the sense that we 
should do something when we can't." 

Andres's intensely subjective approach 
benefits from her personal involvement with 
her subject matter. Black Kites is based on the 
writings and drawings of Alma Hajric, a 
Sarajevan visual artist Andres befriended in 
1988, when they were both on tour with their 
respective theater groups in Spain. The two 
women struck up a correspondence, and 
Hajric visited Andres in New York. After the 
siege of Sarajevo, Hajric sent her journals to 



her new American friend and gave Andres per- 
mission to use them in a film; she even helped 
with the translation. 

Hajric is a poetic writer, able to chronicle the 
physical and psychological effects of life in the 
basement shelter with reflexivity and jarring 
beauty. "We often fantasize about food," she 
writes, "fresh vegetables, a juicy orange." She 
speaks of longing ("On television they show 
advertisements with swimming pools, happy 
people. ..all these things are beyond your 
reach") and fear ("I know that life itself is 
stronger than the terror of my existence") . Her 
diaries are read aloud by singer/performer Mira 
Furlan and provide the voice-over narration for 
a series of silent dramatic reenactments, as well 
as the film's more interpretive visual material — 
newsreels, a fire, the diary, Hajric's artwork, 
and other symbolic imagery. 

To duplicate the closed interior space sug- 




Photo: Paula Court, courtesy filmmaker 



gested by the journals, the film was shot almost 
entirely in the basement of the filmmaker's 
home in Brooklyn. Actors Mimi Goese and 
Andres's husband, actor/director Steve 
Buscemi, and their three-and-a-half-year-old 
son, Lucian, silently but expressively perform 
the everyday acts described by Alma — talking, 
eating, cooking, and sleeping. Intermixed are 
sequences of what Andres calls "light paint- 
ing"— colored shapes that move across the 
film's surface and, seemingly, in and out of 
Alma's thoughts, and which evoke a dreamlike, 
surreal sense of being. This imagery, along with 
the use of symbolic close-ups and theatrical 
lighting, bring Andres's stylistic interpretation 
to Alma's feelings and experiences. 

Through Hajric, Andres was able to obtain a 
recording of Sarajevan children singing. Their 
voices were incorporated into the soundtrack, 
which also utilizes a traditional Bosnian folk 

song, adapted 
for the original 
musical score 
by Hahn 

Rowe. 

Despite its 
reality-based 
content and 
rootedness in 
Sarajevan cul- 
ture, Andres 
does not see 
Black Kites as a 
documentary 
film, at least 
not as tradi- 
t i o n a I I y 
defined. "I 
consider it 
more of an 
experimental 
film," she says, 
"because it is 
really my 

interpretal ii mi 
of the interior 
life of her 
| A I m a ' x | 
mind." 

With it- J. itk 
subject m. ittcr 
and political 
subtext, BI<«./< 
Kites marks 
something ol a 
departure foi 
Andres, a 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 13 



dancer and filmmaker whose past work has 
focused on formal experiments with shape, 
light, and visual perception for live stage the- 
ater. Earlier works include Lucid Possession 
(1988), a film/dance performance piece, and 
Dreaming Out Loud, a multimedia show pre- 
sented at the Performing Garage in 1990, which 
a New York Times review described as using 
"choreography, films, and a collage of taped 
music to create dreams her audience could 
watch with eyes wide open with astonishment." 

In a recent telephone interview, Andres was 
modest about the critical attention her film is 
receiving; many considered it one of the high- 
lights at the Independent Feature Film Market 
last September, and it subsequently had a 
strong showing at Sundance. Instead, she 
prefers to praise her cast and collaborators. 
Andres dedicated Black Kites to the artists of 
the Obala Arts Center in Sarajevo — the collec- 
tive with which Alma worked. They will 
receive a percentage of the film's proceeds and 
can also screen and distribute Black Kites, says 
Andres. 

But Andres seems hesitant about the film 
playing any kind of advocacy role. "Alma 
Hajric" is actually a pseudonym, she told me, 
because her friend, who continues to live and 
work in Sarajevo, was "doubtful that the film 
would change anything" and "wary of having 
her journal associated with money being made 
from the situation in Sarajevo." Perhaps, 
though, Andres is too modest about her role in 
showing the human toll of the brutality and 
genocide in Bosnia, a toll that can seem so 
removed, so unreal, in the media's superficial 
reportage. 

In one of the last scenes of the film, Alma 
tells of a dream in which she's running through 
a park, pulling a tangled thread of black kites 
and terrified that one will break loose and fly 
away. In Sarajevo, "a black kite is released into 
the sky when one's beloved has died," she 
explains. Andres's Black Kites humanizes the 
terror of life and loss under siege, creating 
empathy and a deeper understanding of moral- 
ity and the resiliency of the human psyche. 

Black Kites: Open City Films, 198 Avenue of 
the Americas, New York, NY 10013; (212) 
343-1850; fax: 343-1849. 



Laurie Ouellette is a media critic and doctoral 
candidate at the University of Massachusetts, 

Amherst. 



THE INSTITUTE FOR 
ALTERNATIVE JOURNALISM 
& THE CALIFORNIA 



rxot in. oiw to^Ajn. iveek 

ACTIVISTS 
AGAINST HATE 

by Susan Gerhard 

Hate crimes may be on the rise, but so are com- 
munity responses to them. Witness the impact 
of one nationwide media campaign, called "Not 
in Our Town Week." Widespread enthusiasm 
greeted this grassroots anti-bigotry campaign, 
which was centered around the 
broadcast of a recent documentary 
called Not in Our Town, produced by 
the California Working Group of 
Oakland. 

The half-hour video documentary 
provides a look at how the workers, 
neighbors, and business owners of 
Billings, Montana, united to drive 
white supremacy out of their town in 
1993. It was initially broadcast in 
September 1994 without much fan- 
fare as part of We Do the Work, the 
California Working Group's public 
television series on workers and 
workplace issues. 

Then, last spring, the video was 
shown at a meeting organized by the 
San Francisco-based Institute for 
Alternative Journalism (IAJ) in 
preparation for its Media and 
Democracy Congress, held this past February. 
Alternative mediamakers and journalists had 
gathered to look for ways to collaborate. Says 
IAJ executive director Don Hazen, "When 
some of us saw the Not in Our Town video, we 
thought that this was a really good case study." 

Once IAJ got involved, Not in Our Town 
became the fulcrum for a nationwide series of 
political events, collectively called "Not In Our 
Town Week." The campaign linked the show's 
rebroadcast on more than 100 public television 
stations (which variously scheduled the airdate 
between December 17 and early January) with 
private screenings, town-hall meetings, and 
public discussions of hate crimes in cities all 
over the United States. 



It was an ambitious undertaking, but it 
also happened to be a huge success. As 
Patrice O'Neill, who coproduced the docu- 
mentary with Rhian Miller, recalls, "Every 
day some fax would come in to us either at 
IAJ or at our office in Oakland describing 
what people were doing in their own com- 
munities." For instance, they heard from a 
union activist in Bloomington, Illinois, who 
was nervous about a Klan recruiting drive in 
nearby Peoria. Says O'Neill, "He organized a 
screening at a local labor hall that included 
150 people — union people, Jewish people, 
and African Americans — all talking about 
what to do about hate in their town." 

The Billings, Montana, story provides 
some answers, such as reporting incidents to 
the police and media, as well as asking local 
businesses and community groups to take an 
interest in protecting both diversity and com- 




On location in Billings, Montana, for the filming of Not in Our Town. 
Clockwise: Cameraman Blake McHugh, host Will Durst, and producers 
Patrice O'Neill and Rhian Miller. Courtesy filmmakers 



munity safety. It seemed destined to inspire 
communities across the country. Originally, 
however, it didn't. After the New York Times 
Magazine published an article in July 1994 on 
what was happening in Billings, few media 
outlets picked it up. Only after the documen- 
tary's producers joined forces with IAJ did 
the story turn into a nationwide model for 
community activism. 

With support or endorsements from 
groups as wide-ranging as the National 
Lesbian and Gay Task Force, AFL-CIO, 
United Auto Workers, Screen Actors Guild, 
and Long Island Council of Churches, the 
California Working Group/IAJ team created 
a network of activists and media outlets 



14 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



interested in promoting the campaign. 

Christine Triano, IAJ's daily coordinator of 
"Not In Our Town Week," found that "Putting 
independent radio or alternative newspapers in 
touch with local activist groups — facilitating 
alliances between local groups — really worked. 
Organizing this campaign was like scattering 
seeds." 

"The theory here in part is how to echo 
things in the media," IAJ's Hazen elaborates. 
"What seems to be clear is that even important 
things that happen, things that are reported in 
the New York Times, don't have impact unless 
picked up by the other media, pundits, and talk 
shows. We are trying to explore an independent 
way of doing this, because the Right does it 
really effectively. If you do an effective job of 
framing something in the independent media, it 
increases the chances that the corporate media 
will pick up on it." 

From the looks of a stack of articles O'Neill 
faxed me, they did. Pundits, editorial-page writ- 
ers, and townspeople from all over the United 
States, got the message and spread it. O'Neill 
recalls, "In Kokomo, Indiana, a woman got real- 
ly excited and took the campaign to police 
force. She wanted every cop to wear 'Not in 
Our Town' buttons. And they did. In Las Vegas 
a former hotel worker, with the help of commu- 
nity organizers and the mayor's office, called a 
press conference with city council and the 
police chief — and got coverage on three TV 
stations, as well as articles in three major news- 
papers," she continues. "People can look at the 
characters in the story and say, 'I can do that.'" 

"It was really huge in Oregon," Triano adds. 
"The murders [of two lesbian activists] in 
Medford galvanized a lot of organizing in rural 
Oregon. The [video's] message is so positive 
and accessible to people. There's a real need for 
affirmative messages right now." 

It's also clear, after this campaign, that there 
are groups willing to send them out. O'Neill, 
who says the "Not In Our Town Week" experi- 
ence showed her there can be "meaningful dis- 
cussion about issues," explains that the 
California Working Group would also like to 
see other people "organize the same kind of 
campaign around workplace issues, the chang- 
ing nature of our economy, and how it's affect- 
ing our communities." 

Visit the "Not In Our Town Week" site on 
the World Wide Web at http://www.a 
kernet.org/an/NIOT.html. 

Susan Gerhard is associate arts editor oj the S.m 

Francisco Ray Guardian. 



RfflERlCflN 
fflONTAGI 

Inc. 



AVID 



.•&« 



900 



AVID 900 NOW AVAILABLE 

FILM & VIDEO PRODUCTION 

POST-PRODUCTION SPECIALISTS 

Hi8 TO BETACAM TIMECODED DUBS 

k | BETACAM SP PACKAGES from $300 



lOTH YEAR ANNIVERSARY 



N I voice 334-8283 334-8345 fax 
375 West B'way 3R. NY. NY 10012 



borders and territories 

exile and family 

home and homeland 

identity and culture 

native aesthetic 

The 42nd Annual 

Robert Flaherty 

Film Seminar 



August 3-8, 1996 

Wells College 
Aurora, New York 

Register Now! 

Grants in Aid Deadline: 
April 26, 1996 

! Curators 

Kathy High 

Ruth Bradley 

Loretta Todd 

Contact IFS at: 

i 305 West 21st Street 

I New York, NY 1001 1-3001 

i 212 727 7262 

fax 212 727 7276 

email ifsnyc@aol.com 



V 




Betacam SP production packages 

Avid MC80DQ S. MC1DQO on/off-line editing 

component Betacam SP on-line editing 

Microtime Paint F/X DL graphics 

Macintosh graphics & compositing 

component HiB transfers 

Betacam SP, 3A4" SP, HiB S. VHS duplication 

25' x 30" stage 

21 2.529.82D4 

DV8V1DE0/738 BHOROHRV NYC 10003 



i 

w 



1 



* 

3 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 15 




Treasures of the 
Sierra Madre Oriental 

Mexico's Mixtec Media 



by Christine 
MacDonald 

Emigdio Julian Caballero's short Docu- 
mentary Viko Noute begins with what is a com- 
monplace scene in his town, San Antonio 
Huitepec, located deep in Mexico's Sierra 
Madre Oriental. A few peasant men, cowboy 
hats shading them from the high mountain 
sun, work a steeply sloping maize field. 

Speaking softly in their native Mixtec lan- 
guage, they dig a hole, preparing the field for a 
sacred ritual. They decapitate a sacrificial goat 
and fill the hole with its blood. Then they pull 
out a bottle of Mezcal, the local brew made 
from distilled cactus juice, pass it around, and 
pour a large draught into the hole. 

This is the Viko Noute or Water Festival, 
which village elders celebrate on March 1st 
each year. "We serve food and drink to the 
earth so that she will produce," Caballero 
explains. His people believe if they neglect the 
land, a terrible catastrophe will beset the com- 
munity. 

A full-time farmer and part-time video lumi- 
nary, Caballero is one of a growing number of 
Native Mexican videomakers offering their 
stories to audiences in their own villages and as 
far away as the United States, Europe, and 
South America. Viko Noute, in Mixtec with 
Spanish subtitles, received warm receptions at 
festivals in New York City and Amiens, France, 
last fall. This and other work by Native 
Mexicans was screened at the Native 
American Film and Video Festival, sponsored 
by the Smithsonian Institute, and at Toronto's 
Sovereign Currents Festival in 1995. 

Videos from indigenous communities often 
expose the context of underdevelopment, 
poverty, and human rights abuses that form 
part of daily life for most of Mexico's 10 million 
native people. Yet these short documentaries, 
like the people who make them, place empha- 
sis on the land and the ancient beliefs that tie 
them to it. 




Caballero has set out to preserve local tra- 
ditions. He says young people in his town 
have nearly forgotten their native language, 
the oral storytelling tradition, even the tale of 
their founding fathers. So, he recorded the 
"local history in Viko Noute, convincing a vil- 
lage elder to trade a live audience for a cam- 
corder's lens. Together, they preserved on 
videotape the centuries -old story of 10 vil- 
lage "grandfathers" who abandoned the 
Valley of Oaxaca to establish San Antonio 
Huitepec high in the sierra and far from 
Spanish colonial rulers. 

"I could only find one elder who could tell 
me the whole story," laments Caballero. 

Such concerns are driving indigenous 
videomakers throughout Mexico. They use 
the medium as a tool of a growing activist 
movement and to transport their ancient sto- 
ries and traditions into the modern age. 

The Mexican movement has been com- 
pared to that of Native American producers 
in the United States, such as Sandy Johnson 
Osawa and Victor Masayesva, whose work 
celebrates tribal traditions and offers similar 
spiritual perspectives and value systems. 

However, differences between the two 
movements are striking, according to the 
Mexican mediamakers. While the Native 
American aesthetic focuses on individual 
artistic visions, the Mexican movement is a 
community- oriented endeavor. 

"Native people in the United States and 
Canada are more concerned with reaffirming 
their identity," says Guillermo Monteforte, 
director of the National Center for 
Indigenous Video in Oaxaca, noting that the 
greater measure of autonomy enjoyed by 
Mexico's indigenous communities has pro- 
tected Native Mexican identity. "Here in 
Mexico, people are more concerned with sur- 

Unlike the U.S., the Mexican government actively sup- 
ports video production by indigenous makers. Pictured 
here: scenes from the springtime water festival (Viko 
Noute) and pottery-making in San Marco. 

Courtesy National Center for Indigenous Video 



16 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



YOUR UBRARY 

HAVE THE 
INDEPENDEM? 

Take this coupon to 

your school or public 

librarian and request a 

subscription today! 



10 issues/yr. 

Library subscription rate $75 

($90 foreign) 

Published by the Foundation for 

Independent Video and Film 

ISSN 0731-0589 

Order from FIVF, 

304 Hudson St., 6th fl., NY, NY 10013; 

(212) 807-1400 

EBSCO: (205) 991-6600; 

fax (205) 991-1479. 

FAXON (US): (800) 283-2966; 

CAN (519) 472-1005; 

CAN fax (519) 472-1072 










ORDER THESE BOOKS FROM FIVF 

NEW EDITIONS - ORDER NOW.' 

The AJVF/FTVF Guide to International Film & Video Festivals 

Kathryn Bowser, ed. $29.95 AIVF members; $34.95 others 

$_= 

Hie AIVF/FIVF Guide to Film & Video Distributors 

Kathryn Bowser, ed. $19.95 AIVF members; $24.95 others 



The Next Step: A Film and Video Distribution Handbook 

Morrie Warshawski, ed. $19.95 AIVF members; $24-95 others 



Order all three new editions and save over 25%! Offer 
expires April 30, 1996. $59.95 $ 

Alternative Visions: Distributing Independent Video in a 
Home Video World by Debra Franco; $9.95 AIVF members; 
$12.95 others $ 



Film and Video Financing by Michael Wiese; $22.95 $_ 



Film Directing Shot by Shot: Visiuxlizing from Concept to 
Screen by Steven D. Katz; $24-95 $ 

Home Video: Producing for the Home Market by Michael 
Wiese: $11.95$ 

The Independent Film & Videomakers Guide by Michael 
Wiese; $13.95 $ 

The P.O.V. Online Experiment by Don Adams & Arlene 
Goldbard; $5.00 incl. postage & handling $ 

Shaking the Money Tree: How to Get Grants and Donations 
for Film and Video by Morrie Warshawski; $24-95 $ 

Postage/handling: US - $3.50 1st book, $1.00 ea. addl; 
Foreign - $5.00 1st book, $1.50 ea. addl $ 



TOTAL $_ 



Make checks payable to FIVF, 304 Hudson St., 6th fl., 
NY, NY 10013; or charge by phone: (212) 807-1400 
or fax: (212)463-8519. 



vival." 

Videomakers like Caballero are often 
activists who have acquired cameras and 
training. Their videos tend to be more ama- 
teurish, replete with camera wobbles and 
other technical errors. But their mission is 
utterly serious. The grinding poverty that 
forces many people to migrate in search of 
seasonal work and provokes land disputes 
and other conflicts between neighbors also 
threatens to destroy communities. These 
videomakers, says Monteforte, "are working 
to preserve community and strengthen 
native culture through video." 

Some 54 activists from 37 groups in 15 
states have received training since the pro- 
gram began. Virtually all of the funding 
comes from the government's National 
Indigenous Institute, or INI, which launched 
its video program in 1990. This kind of gov- 
ernment support for indigenous mediamakers 
has earned kudos from native and nonnative 
people alike (although INI's dependence on 
the government has raised some doubts 
about the amount of artistic freedom the 
indigenous videomakers enjoy when it comes 
to criticizing their benefactor and the coun- 
try's political realities). 

"The idea was to give the cameras to com- 
munity members," Monteforte says. His cen- 
ter was set up 1994 with INI funds and some 
private donations. Last November INI offi- 
cials opened a second media center in 
Morelia, Michoacan, which will service pro- 
ducers in northern Mexico. 

"Our role is to support and advise video- 
makers," says Javier Samano, who directs the 
INI program nationwide. "We are training 
people now, so that in the future indigenous 
people will run the centers." 

INI officials were not first to bring media 
to indigenous communities. In the seventies, 
film made its way down a dirt road leading to 
the tiny town of Villa Hidalgo Yalalag, in the 
Oaxacan Sierra. A village movie buff started 
screening art films and agricultural documen- 
taries in his living room tor bis neighbors. By 
the eighties, the community had purchased a 
camera tor recording local festivities, land 
struggles, and other events ot concern to the 
community. 

In the two decades that followed, video 
cameras proliferated, especially in the villages 
ot Oaxaca and Michoacan, where some of 
Mexico's worst poverty forces indigenous 
people to seek seasonal work in the United 
States. "They came hack with video cameras 



to record weddings and town fiestas. Then they 
got ideas for other programs," Samano says. 

"On commercial television, all they see are 
stories about rich people whose reality is far 
from their own," he continues. "They want to 
produce programs that relate to their lives." 

And so they create programs about herbal 
medicine and age-old, nearly forgotten organic 
farming techniques. Caballero is planning a 
video that deals with local corruption and 
another on the hardships of migrant workers. 
The Parikiutin Volcano, by Valente Soto, tells of 
a devastating eruption in Michoacan 52 years 
ago. The Making of the Mask helps drum up new 
business for its authors in Jamiltetec, Oaxaca. 
In Quintana Roo, farmers produced a promo- 
tional video to help them sell crops to restaura- 
teurs in the nearby beach resort of Cancun. In 
Pocoulum, Chiapas, indigenous leaders record- 
ed health problems caused by the lack of 
potable water and sent it to the government to 
demand services. 

Community activist Eugenia Martinez, a 23- 
year-old Zapotec Indian who recently attended 
a training workshop at Monteforte's center, has 
turned to video to help her village of San Pedro 
Quiatoni, another remote community in the 
mountains of Oaxaca. 

"Where I come from there is hardly any 
water, and the fields are nearly worn out. We 
want to study the old ways of farming without 
chemical fertilizers to improve the harvest and 
care for the land," she says. The group has its 
own camcorder, VCR, and television set. 
Through the National Center for Indigenous 
Video, they will receive access to editing equip- 
ment and technical help, allowing them to pro- 
duce informational videos on organic farming 
techniques and other community programs. 

"In a year's time, we will have a record of 
what we have done, what worked, and what has 
failed. We hope it will lend continuity and 
direction to our work," Martinez says. 

Video, a tool and a symbol of the modern 
world that has all but forgotten remote com- 
munities like San Pedro, will be especially effec- 
tive reaching people of Martinez's generation, 

"Young people today do not have the roots of 
our culture to anchor us, like the older people 
do," she says. "We want to use video to rescue 
the past, so it can help us improve the present 
situation." 

While most ot the indigenous work has been 
documentary, videomakers are beginning to 
experiment. "They .ire still exploring the medi- 
um and starting to make it their own," Samano 
says, "for instance, the Yaquis in the north of 



the country are really good editors, but they say 
editing kills the spirit of the thing." As a result, 
Yaqui programs sometimes last up to four hours. 
Since they have shown little interest in pre- 
senting the work outside the community, 
nobody complains. 

But other native producers are very interest- 
ed in attracting wider audiences. Many of them 
from across the country have come together to 
form the Mexican Organization of Indigenous 
Video Makers to promote and distribute their 
work. Several videos have traveled to festivals 
in New York, Chicago, Paris, Ecuador, and 
Peru. The Smithsonian Institute recently 
bought a dozen programs. 

Even so, distribution and exhibition remain 
the biggest problems facing indigenous video- 
makers. Monteforte's group occasionally loads a 
truck with videos, a projector, and an electric 
generator and takes the show on the road like 
the last century's movie pioneers. Schools and 
churches occasionally double as screening 
rooms, and a few local entrepreneurs have con- 
verted their living rooms into video clubs. Two 
television stations run by Mixe indigenous lead- 
ers in Oaxaca and three stations run by the 
Roman Catholic Church in Michoacan also 
offer an occasional outlet for local work. 
Nevertheless, screening opportunities are few. 

"My work has hardly been distributed," says 
Caballero, whose work has received mixed 
reactions. "Some people are not at all interest- 
ed. Others see the value in conserving our cus- JT 
toms." 

The National Center for Indigenous Video 
plans to publish a video catalogue and rent cas- 
settes to community groups, much like a video 
store with mail order capabilities. At the 
moment, however, the project is on hold while 
the group seeks donations to pay for 500 blank 
cassettes needed to copy work. Further, produc- 
ers say they must resolve other philosophical 
problems that the modern medium has intro- 
duced into ancient communities. 

"Video is a very specialized skill," Monte- 
forte says. "When you teach it to a member ot 
an indigenous community, you make him or her 
special and powerful. It disrupts indigenous 
community beliefs." 

The National Center tor Indigenous Video, 

Circuito La Cascada #103, Fraccion La 
Cascada, Oaxaca, Oaxaca, 68040, Mexico; 

tel/fax: 52-951-537-15. 



Christine MacDorudd is .i freelance journalist based in 
Boston who iv/«>rts frequendy jnrm Lmn America. 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 17 



IONG RANGE ROVERS 

by Mitch Albert 

Today's media arts landscape is a harsh Badlands, with funding 
sources parched dry and political posses keeping vigilant watch for 
troublesome Outsiders. Yet there's a heartening number of success 
stories to be heard. Here's a half-dozen encouraging tales about 
media arts centers that are surviving the nineties. 

The House That Jon Built 

A HANDSOME LANDMARK FIREHOUSE ON THE EDGE OF MANHATTAN'S CHINATOWN BEARS THE SIGN 
"Engine Co. #31, Battalion 2." Only the astute will notice a smaller, humble doorside plaque that 
identifies its owner-occupants: Downtown Community Television (DCTV). 

"We must have more space than any other media center in the world," says DCTV helmsman 
and veteran video documentarian Jon Alpert, who cofounded the center 23 years ago with his wife, 
documentarian Keiko Tsuno. DCTV is indeed rich in space. After 16 years on the second floor of 
this vast building, the media center is quadrupling its space to 15,000 square feet. DCTV's new 
digs are diverse enough to include an attic espresso bar and an Avid room elegantly set off by tata- 
mi mats, shoji screens, and a futon. This is the media center your mother wanted you to marry. 

Moreover, it is augmenting its equipment to allow low-budget mediamakers to cruise from pre- 
to postproduction on the most gossamer of state-of-the-art techno-wings, and all the while main- 
taining an unpretentious, compassionate, activist, and resolutely populist demeanor. 

The purchase of the labyrinthine fire station last year was originally a joint venture between its 
two tenants, DCTV and the Chinese American Planning Council. The latter flirted with bank- 
ruptcy late into construction, saved only by DCTV's decision to buy out the council's 17,000 
square foot share. 

"It was touch and go at the beginning [of 1995]," Alpert recalls. "We overextended ourselves. 
We didn't expect to own the whole building and spent twice as much money getting it. But if the 
council had gone bankrupt, the judge could have ordered the building sold, even subjugating 
DCTV's ownership of its space. It was a dangerous situation that could have jeopardized our 
future." 

Aided by a loan from the MacArthur Foundation, DCTV pulled off the purchase. They cut 
costs where possible, suspended some staffers temporarily, and became a landlord in search of a 
tenant. As of January, it appeared as though a French sculptor was ready to sign a lease. 

DCTV quickly began filling its extra floors — a sign of how ready it was to expand. Consider its 
offerings: five Avid work stations; workshops galore on video production, digital editing, the 
Internet, you name it — all at a price that's well within reach of the beginning or low-budget pro- 
ducers, Chinatown residents, and the community organizations that make up DCTV's primary 
clientele; an attic-level screening room and multimedia performance space; an equipment bank 
used by as many as 100 community organizations a year; youth programs and internships, and 
much more. 

The big question is: how does this ship stay afloat? 

"Very low salaries, long hours, sweatshop conditions," Alpert intones, as DCTV administrator 
and filmmaker Hye Jung Park covers her face in mortified laughter. Alpert continues his spiel: "No 
heating, lack of creature comforts for the staff, an absence of decent plumbing. We rely on the 
extreme dedication of the people who decide to stay." 

What Alpert doesn't say is that DCTV has excelled in both grantsmanship and earned income 
over the years. The organization was the first-ever media center to be supported by the MacArthur 
Foundation, which subsequently — and with great enthusiasm, according to Alpert — developed 




sponsorship for similar media arts groups. 
They've also attracted support from the 
National Endowment for the Arts, the New 
York State Council on the Arts, the Freedom 
Forum, the Nathan Cummings Foundation, 
and others. 

MacArthur's latest grant, which enabled 
DCTV to purchase the fire station, came in 
the form of a $500,000 investment grant, 
which DCTV must repay over five years at 
three percent interest. "We'd be on the street 
without MacArthur," Alpert says. "Even the 
charitable arms of banks, which we've dealt 
with before, wanted 13 or 14 percent inter- 
est. With MacArthur, it was basically a hand- 
shake. We'll begin paying it back with the 



18 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 




new tenant s rent. 

"Our responsibility is heightened now," 
Alpert continues, "because if we screw this 
up, we screw it up for a whole bunch of other 
people. We want to make [the Foundation] 
proud." 

Alpert himself is one of DCTV's most 
energetic benefactors, through his willing- 
ness to put his money where his mouth is. As 
he discreetly puts it, 'The bulk of our money 
is earned through broadcast licensing fees for 
our programs." Of course, "our programs" 
include his own successful productions, 
which have been sold to NBC, HBO, and 
other lucrative outlets. Alpert's "what's mine 
is ours" philosophy has greatly benefited 



DCTY 

"I'm basically just a salaried employee," he 
says. "DCTV pays me out of its operating bud- 
get. Any money made from any projects I work 
on goes right into the organization. My mother 
doesn't like that arrangement, but that's the 
way we've always worked." 

The NBC link has benefitted the organiza- 
tion in other ways, as well. Alpert notes that 
Tom Brokaw, who sits on DCTV's board, has 
steered "halt a million dollars' worth ot grants" 
their way over the years. 

Although licensing fees and distribution 
income do not quite outweigh DCTV's grant 
money, Alpert confirms th.it earned income "is 
an important part ot our fiscal health. It amor- 



tizes many costs, so when the equipment needs 
to be maintained and upgraded, we can do it" 

As for DCTV's stellar hardware expansion, 
much of the really good si nil comes via a sweet 
deal with Avid and Apple, negotiated on good 
faith and DCTV's proven track record ot 
putting new technology to good use. "We had 
the first interformat editing in the U.S., and 
Sony told us it would never work," Alpert says. 
"We strung some cables together, and we made 
it work. We were a Beta test site [fol Sony] 
eight or nine years ago, too." 

Avid donated five Media Suite coediting sys- 
tems; Apple promised to pony up the linkup 
Computers. The deals enhance DCTV's ability 
to produce professional-quality material, and 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 19 



fost& 
Luscious 



500, 750 and 1000 watts 
without the weight or 
hassle. Lowel Rifa-lites. 
The skinny travel 
companions that turn 
into bright, sensually soft 
sources in seconds. 



*> 




<3 

■ 




lOHieF 



Lowel-Light Manufacturing, Inc. 

14058th Street Brooklyn, New York 11220 
71 8 921 -0600 Fax: 71 8 921 -0303 



the relationships that DCTV forged with com- 
panies like Apple and Avid set an example for 
other media centers bent on survival with class. 
With the new technology, "community TV is 
in a situation comparable to the early seventies, 
when ENG programming was just coming in," 
Alpert says. "In the beginning, the networks 
tried to keep independents out by challenging 
the signal quality of their work, although it was 
really the content they objected to. We have 
ensured, and we'll be able to continue to make 
sure, that high-end quality is always available." 

A Dream Deferred No Longer 

Less able to manage the kind of unfettered 
expansion enjoyed by DCTV, Third World 
Newsreel has mapped out a strategy for survival 
that allows it to regroup its energies before 
pushing forward, one battle at a time. 

Founded in 1968 as Camera News, Third 
World Newsreel has as its mission the develop- 
ment and dissemination of "underrepresented 
voices," including women, people of color, and 
activists. 

According to executive director Ada Gay 
Griffin, Third World Newsreel is "getting lean- 
er and meaner as an organization." With last 
year's $300,000 operating budget already a sign 
of curtailed spending, "We're not going to be 
able to do ambitious productions as in the 
past," Griffin says. "We're not eliminating [the 
possibility], we're just not aggressively pursuing 
it." The New York-based center produced, 
among other projects, last year's The Women 
Outside: Korean Women and the U.S. Military, 
directed by Newsreel's corporate secretary and 
production director J. T Takagi and Hye Jung 
Park, and the ITVS-funded A Litany for 
Survival: The Life and Work of Audre Lorde, by 
Griffin and Michelle Parkerson, which was 
acclaimed at Berlin and Sundance in 1995. 
Both films will air on P.O.V this summer. 

In 1991, Third World Newsreel received a 
major NEA Advancement Grant. The first 
phase involves a rigorous one-year self-assess- 
ment and long-term planning process, which 
Griffin calls "very arduous. It was very delicate. 
In our entire history, we had never taken a good 
look at where we were supposed to be going as 
an organization." She adds, "Planning has now 
become a part of our institutional culture." The 
self-assessment resulted in Third World redi- 
recting itself, first by deciding to "strengthen 
our governing structure," according to Griffin. 
This involved implementing refurbished and 
more professional administrative policies and 
the creation of a whole new board of directors 




in 1994. 

Their new board is a winning roster that 
includes Amy Chen, financial director of the 
New Museum of Contemporary Art; Mary 
Lea Bandy, chief curator of the film/video 
programs of the Museum of Modern Art; 
and Cynthia Lopez, former executive direc- 
tor of Deep Dish TV. The board has been 
meeting regularly to formulate a decisive 
fundraising strategy to be implemented this 
year. 

Part of this strategy is a greater emphasis 
on earned income by better utilizing one of 
Third World Newsreel's greatest strengths: 
its film and video collection, which include 
works by such luminaries as Charles Burnett, 
Gurinder Chadha, Lourdes Portillo, and Julie 
Dash. The new steward of its distribution 
operations, Veena Cabreros-Sud, was 
brought aboard for just such a task, and by 
all accounts has performed exquisitely. 
Griffin credits her with "revitalizing and pro- 



20 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 




fessionalizing" an area that had been some- 
what out of focus in the past. Income from 
distribution has increased 150 percent over 
the last three years, according to Griffin. 

"The collection is unique and excellent," 
Cabreros-Sud says of Newsreel's catalog. "It 
needed a little bit of a push for greater visi- 
bility. We've put together a lot of different 
packages for sale and rental, organized 
around issues critical to Americans, people 
of color, and the Third World. We've added 
new, important artists; expanded our market- 
ing materials, and put out a new-release 
brochure," which organizes the work around 
such themes as health care, cultural conflict, 
sexuality, and gender issues. 

In fiscal year 1995, $113,000, or 32 per- 
cent of overall funds, were derived from dis- 
tribution. Griffin projects earnings of 
$140,000 for FY'96. "We've got to keep 
learned income] growing," she says. 
"Survival depends on this." Griffin adds that 



the center is also targeting more private foun- 
dations, casting a "wide net" that aims to cover 
the gap left by reduced grants from state and 
federal arts agencies. 

Also in the mix is new technology. "Third 
World Newsreel has got to become digital if we 
want to survive beyond the year 2000," Griffin 
says, noting that the organization is celebrating 
its thirtieth anniversary in December 1997. 
"We need to find ways of accessing and owning 
the means of production. CD-ROM, electronic 
publishing — this is going somewhere we've 
never been before." To that end, Griffin says, 
"we're doing our homework," which includes 
maintaining the presence of someone on the 
board who is fluent in the new technology (a 
role now filled by Louis Erskine, a nonlinear 
video editor). 

Finally, Third World Newsreel pulls in a 
small bit of revenue from another steady 
source. "We train 12 economically disadvan- 
taged artists a year in production workshops," 



CONTENT '96 

A great idea 
around every corner 

May 15th - 18th 

Oakland, CA 

The National Educational 

Media Network's 

annual Conference & 

Media Market 

Media Market submission 
deadline: 
April 5th 

Conference registration 
deadline: 
May 1st 




CONFERENCE 

- 4 day intensive covering 
industry trends, fundraising, 

distribution & marketing strategies. 

Networking & dealmaking, 
talent & resources 

- in one place, at one time. 

MARKET 

- Producers with documentaries, 

short narratives, live action 

programs and CD-ROMs geared 

for worldwide educational markets. 

-Distributors & publishers who 

specialize in selling to 

schools, universities, public 

libraries, government agencies, 

community groups, 

medical institutions, business, 

television, specialized 

retail outlets. 

More than 50 major distributors 
and publishers represented. 

-The only U.S. market 

devoted exclusively to 

educational media. 



For more information, contact: 

NEMN 655 13th Street, 

Oakland.CA 94612-1220 

PH 510 465 6885 • FX 510.465 2835 

E-mail nemn@aol com 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 21 




^independent The ABCs of Media Education 

\- \/ \ J ,' \ What is media literacy? How can it be integrat- 

ed into the K-12 curriculum? How can a 
teacher "grade" media projects? Find out in our 
24-page reprint of The Independent's popular 
special issue, "Media in the Schools." 

Film Schools: A Special Report 

Profiles nine leading film degree programs. Also includes an essay on teaching independent film- 
making values within an introductory production course; plus coverage of the annual National 
Educational Media Market. (August/September 1994) 

To order, send $5 (incl. postage & handling) to: Back Issues, The Independent, 304 Hudson St., 6th 
ft., NY, NY 10013. 




1/7 

SCHOOL OF THE ARTS 

NYU Film 



Summer '96 Session I: May 20-June 28 • Session II: July 1-August 9 

During the summer, the Tisch School makes its profes- 
sionally oriented curriculum available to students from 
around the world. Tisch offers 100 summer courses in 
the performing and media arts. 

Film Production 

• Directing • Cinematography • Lighting • Sound 

• Editing • Producing • Animation • Special Effects 

Screenwriting 

• Writing the Feature Film • Scriptwriting • Script 
Analysis 

•» y ^r * For a free NYU Summer Bulletin with a complete list- 

INfcWlOivK ing of Tisch courses, return the coupon or call 
UfiIV®STY 1-800-771-4NYU, ext. 853. 




Please send me a free 1996 NYU Summer Bulletin. 



Tisch School of the Arts 

Summer Sessions 

721 Broadway 

12th Floor 

New York, NY 10003-6807 



New York University is an affirmative 
action/equal opportunity institution- 



NAME 


ADDRESS 




APT. NO. 


CITY 


STATE 


ZIP CODE 



AREA OF INTEREST 



Griffin says. "They pay a nominal tuition — 
$450 for the year. It's not dollar-driven. Our 
motive is to empower underrepresented media- 
makers and get their work out to a wide audi- 
ence." Cherokee filmmaker Randy Redroad, 
director Bridgett Davis (Naked Acts), and 1991 
Sundance Screenwriters and Directors Lab 
graduate Jamal Joseph are among the recent 
Newsreel alumni. 

"Media skills are tools for empowerment, for 
sharing information not available elsewhere," 
Griffin says, explaining the mission, always the 
mission, underlying Newsreel's tenacity. "We 
must take the initiative in making sure people 
of color have leadership roles in the [media] 
field. It's not just an issue of art, it's an issue of 
underattended culture, of social justice. Even 
without art, we would have to exist. We're edu- 
cators, and we're here for the duration." 

A Well-Endowed 
Steeltown Dream 

The lineup of facilities reads like a starvin' 
mediamaker's Santa list: a dozen flatbed editing 



: 




tables; online and offline suites; two Avids; 
new 16mm, video, and still camera equip- 
ment; abundant lighting equipment; new 
computers and digital imaging software; an 
animation lab; new darkrooms for color, 
black and white, and non-silver film; two 
galleries; a 133-seat screening room with 
16mm and 35mm projection, and a 185-seat 
arthouse in downtown Pittsburgh that shows 
both first-run films and classics. 

It's all part of Pittsburgh Filmmakers, and 
if you're studying there or are a member of 
this 25-year-old institution, it's yours for the 
asking — but you have to share. 

"Our mission is threefold," says executive 
director Charlie Humphrey. "Education, 
exhibition, and getting media tools into the 
hands of those who need them, at low cost." 
Pittsburgh Filmmakers began as an alliance 
of artists without access to low-cost equip- 
ment who linked up with the Carnegie 
Institute, now the Carnegie Museum of Art. 
The museum is no longer affiliated with 
Pittsburgh Filmmakers, but it's just about the 
only such institution in town that isn't. 



Education is at the core of all that is L 
Pittsburgh Filmmakers. "The secret of our suc- 
cess is that, over the last two decades, we've 
established really strong ties to major universi- 
ties in the area," Humphrey explains. Students 
at Carnegie Mellon University, Duquesne 
University, the University of Pittsburgh, Carlow 
College, and Point Park College all may take 
courses at Pittsburgh Filmmakers, both for elec- 
tive credit and to fulfill degree requirements in 
film, photography, and communications stud- 
ies. "For the schools to work with us makes 
sense," Humphrey says. "It's very expensive to 
start up a film program. Here we already have 
the expertise and all the equipment. We actual- 
ly started quite small, just a couple of classes 
here and there, but as film and photography 
studies blossomed, so did we." 

Fiscally, Pittsburgh Filmmakers is downright 
robust. Earned income for 1995 amounted to 
$1,013,300, the harvest of diverse cash genera- 
tors: rentals, exhibitions, membership, and, the 
cornerstone of its success, student enrollment. 

Once spread out over several blocks in tour 
different buildings, Pittsburgh Filmmakers has 




The Evolution of Camera Stabilization has just taken 
"One Giant Leap" forward The Glidecam Dual-G is the 
first Dual-Gimbaled, Dual-Handled, Counterbalanced 
Camera Stabilization System designed to distribute the 
weight of the system between two operators The Dual-G 
stabilizes cameras weighing from 8 to 22 pounds, and 
frees the camera in ways only previously accomplished 
with systems costing ten times as much 



We also offer the Glidecam 1000 Pro hand-held 
stabilizer for cameras up to 6 pounds, and the Glidecam 
3000 Pro stabilizer for cameras from 4 to 10 pounds, 
and the Camcrane 100 boom-arm camera crane 
for cameras weighing up to 20 pounds 



Available at Major Dealers or call Glidecam Industries 

1-800-949-2089 or 1-508-866-2199 



Glidecam is registered at the PATENT and TM office 



LOW 

BUDGET 

VIDEO 

BIBLE 

BY CUFF MTH 



I 30-day 
money 
back 
: guarantee 

Call with 
credit-card, 

or send 
check/m.o. 

Desktop 

Video 

Systems 

Box 668 

NYC 10272 

Just $27.95 

plus $3 

shipping 

NY residents 
add $2.31 

Hi8 and S-VHS 

SECRETS REVEALED! 

The essential do-it-yourself guide to creating 
top-notch video on a shoestring budget 

Editing, shooting strategies, 

time code systems, audio 

tracks, computer-based 

desktop video, & much 

more! 400 pages. 

ORDER NOW (24-hr) 

1-800-247-6553 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 23 



just consolidated and upgraded its 
facilities in a spanking new 20,000 
square-foot space, with a parking 
lot to boot. The relocation last 
December was made possible by a 
number of one-time donations 
from private Pittsburgh founda- 
tions. 

"We have a very large amount of 
local support," Humphrey says. 
"Historically, being a prosperous 
steel town, Pittsburgh has had a 
strong philanthropic base. Even 
today, relative to the size of the city, 
[local philanthropy] is still quite 
strong. These foundations recog- 
nize that Pittsburgh Filmmakers 
can make the city look good on a national 
level." 

There must be something to that: the list of 
foundations supporting Pittsburgh Filmmakers 
reads like a society ball, with names like 
Howard Heinz, Richard King Mellon, Roy A. 
Hunt, and William T Hillman among the regu- 
lars. In 1995, private funding totaled $81,485. 
In attracting this support, the organization's 
affiliation with local universities is a major fac- 
tor. "There's no doubt that foundations respect 
our reputation with the schools," Humphrey 
says. 

The renovated warehouse that now serves as 
Pittsburgh Filmmakers's headquarters was the 
offering of a well-heeled local real-estate devel- 
oper and film buff (whose mansion, according 
to Humphrey, boasts its own 16mm theater). 
The organization rents the space at a low price, 
with an exclusive option to buy. Raising the 
money to do so, says Humphrey, is the next 
plan in the works. 

The state of Pennsylvania is also blessed with 
an arts council that has a generous and for- 
ward-looking administration. The Pennsylvania 
Council on the Arts's grant to Pittsburgh 
Filmmakers amounted to $75,000 last year. 
Combined with the NEA's $19,500, it con- 
tributed to the approximately 15 percent of the 
center's operating budget that is derived from 
contributed income. 

"The NEA funds were not cut for opera- 
tions," Humphrey says, "although [this income] 
has been declining steadily over the last few 
years. What they did eliminate was the $60,000 
for the Mid-Atlantic Regional Media Arts 
Fellowship program, which we administer." 
(This program still continues on a 
Pennsylvania-only basis, with PCA money. See 
story p. 7.) 

Pittsburgh Filmmakers is an object lesson in 




maximizing good fortune. Blessed with an envi- 
ronment that includes numerous schools and 
universities, private foundations, and a sup- 
portive state arts council, this media center has 
made the most of it, thanks to their own sound 
planning and synergistic thinking. 

Getting the Goods 

Public funding for media arts centers is getting 
as tight as the puckered lips of a conservative 
naysayer. It seems the organizations that will 
survive the nineties are those that can recog- 
nize and exploit their own strengths, take 
advantage of the local climate (e.g., Is it foun- 
dation rich? Is it dying for training in new 
media?), and be willing to evolve. 

DCTV has invested in the newest technolo- 
gy and alliances with manufacturers; Third 
World Newsreel has formed a strong brain trust 
and is exploiting its unique film and video col- 
lection; Pittsburgh Filmmakers has solidified 
ties with the major educational and financial 
players in its area and owns prime exhibition 
venues. 

What follows are a few more brief examples 
of media arts centers that are changing with the 
times and positioning themselves for life 
beyond the year 2000. 

Bay City Rollers 

The Bay Area Video Coalition (BAVC) is a 
lemonade -from-lemons kind of organization. 
When the public well began to dry up, says 
BAVC director of research and development 
Luke Hones, "We began to develop greater 
earned income potential.. ..We took the hand 
we were dealt and tried focusing on what we do 
best." 

What BAVC does best is train people in hi- 
tech digital and electronic media. When they 



noticed many of their program 
graduates getting jobs with 
major manufacturers like Avid, 
Apple, ACOM, and Quantel, 
they approached these and 
other corporations and sold 
them on BAVC's reputation as 
a breeding ground for future 
industry professionals. The 
companies saw the light and 
set about helping BAVC 
upgrade their equipment. 
"We have complementary 
needs," Hones says. "Most 
commercial facilities in the Bay 
Area use freelance editors, so 
the decisions about what 
equipment to buy are based on the prefer- 
ence of this pool of freelancers." If an editor 
has acquired proficiency on an Avid or 
ACOM at BAVC, for instance, they're likely 
to recommend it as professionals. 

Earned income came to $700,000 last year, 
according to Hones. "That's about 70 per- 
cent of our [total] income." 

BAVC keeps its antennae tuned to new 
prospects. Their foray into video preservation 
proved to be a substantial earner. "We saw a 
real need for updating formats of old video 
works," Hones says. "And we had the right 
skills and equipment." 

BAVC has also developed programs for 
closed-captioning and descriptive media for 
the blind. "These special communities are a 
whole other audience," Hones says. Similarly, 
BAVC forged links to two major dance orga- 
nizations in the area, Theater Artaud and 
World Arts West. "We're trying to develop 
markets for high quality video recording of 
dance performances," Hones says, with the 
sensible rationale that making them look 
good on tape "helps them get their grants." 

911 Is No Joke 

"There's an incredible multimedia interest in 
Seattle," effuses Karen Hirsch, executive 
director of 911, the sole nonprofit media arts 
center in the land of Microsoft. As a result, 
911 has shifted its focus to include the needs 
of this eager constituency. The old, unused 
Steenbeck that Hirsch was reluctant to toss 
is now gone, making room for new video 
postproduction equipment. "I would encour- 
age any media art center to begin adding dig- 
ital media to their roster, however they can, 
even if it's only at the level of software," she 
says. 



24 THE INDEPENDENT April 1 996 



In a stroke of genius, 911 arranged for one 
of its members to purchase an entire editing 
suite and split the rental revenue with the 
center. "This way," Hirsch says, "we didn't 
have to lay out $15,000 for equipment." 
Other members are now considering similar 
deals. 

A $40,000 grant from the King County 
Cultural Resources Division in 1994 boosted 
911 into PowerMac 9500 territory, complete 
with Premiere software. Hirsch says the 
PowerMac station will eventually turn a pret- 
ty penny in constant rentals. 

Overall, earned income last year added up 
to $190,000, or 65 percent of the total oper- 
ating budget. Hirsch expects that figure to 
increase to $226,000 in 1996. 

Though Seattle is "millionaire country," 
according to Hirsch, she admits 911 has 
lagged in identifying private donors. "A cou- 
ple of family foundations give us small 
amounts, but that's not enough. More of 
these people might give us money if they 
knew we were here. That's a big part of our 
strategy: greater visibility." To this end, 911 
has mounted a well-received lecture series at 
the University of Washington, "Creating 
Cyberculture." 

To further wean itself from public money, 
911 has launched a corporate membership 
program. "Last year a whole bunch of com- 
panies were sending their employees here for 
training," Hirsch says, "so we decided to 
innovate with this program." Among 91 l's 
new users are the Federal Aviation 
Administration, which signed on for an 
eight-week video session, and Adobe. 
Companies like Adobe are often staffed with 
people fluent only in digital language; video 
is a skill they must learn to develop multime- 
dia products. 

"As part of the national downsizing trend, 
companies want to educate their staff rather 
than hire outsiders," Hirsch says. "That kind 
of training is a priority for us." 

A Community Affair 

Intermedia Arts recently relocated to a 
South Minneapolis neighborhood, and with- 
in days the building was covered with graffi- 
ti. Proof of urban decay.' Hardly. 

"We got together the graffiti artists in the 
neighborhood and let them loose on the new 
building," says Tom Borrup, the center's 
director. "It looks great." The move from a 
university to a residential area has allowed 
Intermedia Arts to develop links with 



younger kids. "Youth is definitely our focus," 
Borrup says. "We engage in a lot of partnerships 
with high schools and alternative schools. 
When Film in the Cities [a prominent 
Minneapolis media center] went out of busi- 
ness, we felt we needed to fill the hole in youth 
programs that was left." 

One interesting grant for $60,000 came from 
the U.S. Department of Education last year. 
Earmarked by the government for "crime pre- 
vention," it included a theater/performance 
workshop for underprivileged youth. The pro- 
gram was a huge success and led to the found- 
ing of a professional theater group. 

"We have a budget of just under $1 million a 
year," Borrup says. "Less than 10 percent is 
earned income." Fortunately, "The Twin Cities 
have a reputation for philanthropy." Local sup- 
port comes from Minnesota's McKnight 
Foundation ($160,000 in 1995), the Dayton- 
Hudson department store, and St. Paul Co., an 
insurance firm. "They have an interest in sup- 
porting diversity and cultural programming, 
which is what we do," Borrup says. This income 
is supplemented by funding from the NEA 
($25,000 this year, down from $75,000 in 1995) 
and the Minnesota State Arts Board. 

"We've tried to develop earned income pro- 
jects in the past, but we jettisoned some of 
them because they lose money and, more 
importantly, detract us from our main goals." 
One such ill-fated enterprise was a tape distrib- 
ution program. "It brought in $40,000 a year," 
Borrup says, "but cost double that to run. And 
it really wasn't part of our focus." 

Nonetheless, earned income is something 
Intermedia Arts is hoping to increase. "With 
the new building — which is a great space in a 
great location with lots of parking — a lot of 
opportunities have opened up," Borrup says. 
That potential includes a cafe, expanded equip- 
ment rentals, and the rental of office space. It 
also allows for screenings and exhibitions pro- 
duced in partnership with area organizations 
like the Latino arts group CreArte, the Walker 
Art Center, and Intermedia Arts's new co-ten- 
ant, the Center for Arts Criticism, headed by 
Beni Matias, former president of the board of 
AIVF. 

Intermedia Arts has already begun phasing 

out video production, and Borrup expects that 

programs will "shrink a little hit" as grants 

decline somewhat next year. "But," he adds, 

"media arts centers have the particular skill of 

being able to shrink or grow to fit the times." 

Mitch Albert i^ a shapeshiftei who has metamorphosed 

from journalist i" documentation and back again. I le is 

i urrendy an aspiring practitioner <<\ ( 'hknese medicine 




Wildlife 

Lightning 

Time-lapse 

Landscapes 

Aerial Scenlcs 

Special Effects 

International 

Underwater 

Cityscapes 

Skyscapes 

Landmarks 

Americana 

People 

Clouds 

Sports 



Largest collection 

of original 

licensable imagery. 

Production ready 

images available in 

all subjects and all 

formats. 

EAST: 2 12-686-4900 
WEST; 818-508-1444 



EXPOSE YOURSELF 
ON THE INTERNET! 

♦ Filmmakers ♦ distributor 
♦ Production companies 

♦ Film and Festival organizations 

♦ anybody involved in the film, 

video and TV industry 

TAKE NOTE: 

Yard Productions will create, design and market 
a web-site for you on the Internet. We can also 
broadcast your film or video clip in real time on 
the web! 

SIGN-UP BONUS: 

1 5 hours of e-mail per month FREE. 



FOR MORE INFORMATION 

call 718-850-3166 

e-mail us at yrd@yrd.com 

or visit our web site 

at www.yrd.com 



i 

YARD 

PRODUCTIONS 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 25 



by Karen Larsen 




Does publicity really matter? Is it really NECESsary to 

I seek out the media in order to get attention for your project? 
I would suggest that it is, and the reasons go far beyond sim- 
ply attracting crowds to a 
P_ _ ^-m^ ^-m^ _ particular screening. 

WAt ^^ mj ^V I Publicity can also help you 
j J mm ■ m ll attract funders, distribu- 

■ ■ ■ tors, festival programmers, 

| j ffl 1| and exhi-bitors; it can fur- 

I | ' j ;gj |I| ther your career as a film- 

l ■ ■ I maker; and it can help to 

|j | - M M facilitate future projects. 

| j W ^^ J\ Publicity also can effect 

B B ^BJB^ Bi change or raise conscious- 

fe I ness, as in the case of a 

W^ M film like Deadly Deception, 

^Qta^pF Debra ( hasnoff's 

Oscar-winning work on 
General Electric, nuclear weapons, and the environment. 

Whether your film is made for theatrical release, television, home video, or educa- 
tional purposes, there is little point if no one sees it. And no one will see your film if 
they do not know about it. Publicity generates business. I do the publicity for a num- 
ber of film festivals. Every time I work on a film that achieves a good amount of pub- 
licity and attention, Landmark Theaters calls me with an offer to show the film. 

In order to achieve your goals, planning for publicity should begin at the outset of 
the project when you are raising funds and writing grants. Start before you get caught 
up in scriptwriting, shooting, editing, and all their attendant problems and details. 
Funds should be set aside early to ensure that there will be enough in the budget for 
publicity. Sometimes an advance story in the newspaper can even assist in fundraising 

efforts. Potential investors, reps, and distributors, 

AM who are always looking for product, notice media 
■ coverage. They can help you most if they find out 

W about your project before it is finished. Since edi- 

^^«J>;I torial coverage in the media is free, you might as 
I ^P^^ ^B well take advantage of it. 
Mm -?! Filmmakers should avoid the scenario where 

Bf }! the film is finished and ready to show to the pub- 

■ -,| lie, and they suddenly realize there are no stills and 

■ j no press packet. With the screening date fast 

I E approaching, filmmakers usually do one of three 

j j things: desperately try to manage the publicity 

j themselves, hire a publicist, or call everyone they 

H ■ | know for advice on how to get some notice for the 

film. 



I 



I 




1 



26 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



Ac this late date, it is often a minor miracle if the filmmaker or even 
an accomplished publicist can get any attention at all. Even if one does 
attract attention, the coverage is not nearly as effective or thorough as 
it might have been had the publicity been started earlier. 

A filmmaker once told me that no one had attended the opening of 
her film. "Was there anything in the paper?" I asked. "Nothing," she 
replied, "not one mention." "Which papers did you send info to?" I 
asked. "None of them," she replied. I asked the filmmaker how she 
expected her film to receive coverage if she did not inform the press. She 
gave a telling if somewhat naive response. "I assumed that reporters are 
well-informed and make it their business to find out what's happening." 

Unfortunately, this attitude is more prevalent than one might think. 
While it is true that reporters do go after a good "news" story, this is not 
as likely in the entertainment section. Reviewers and feature writers 
depend on releases and phone calls from publicists for many of their 
ideas. Reaching these people requires a carefully worked-out strategy 
that should begin before the first day of shooting. 




Planning Ahead 



The first thing you need to do is define your goals. What audience are 
you trying to reach? Is your production for television, cable, home video, 
or the theatrical market? Should it play the film festival circuit? Do you 
warn publicity now or later? Consider what is unique about your project. 
Keep in mind the fact that you will not >^ct a long interview in your local 
paper both while in production and again later when the film is com- 
pleted, unless there is another angle tor the writer to pursue. loo much 
coverage during a festival cm compromise your film's future, since news- 
papers will not run a review twice. These are just a tew ot the reasons tor 
pi. tuning your coverage carefully throughout the production period. 
Asking these questions will aid the publicity process even if you do not 
know all ot the answers. 



During production you will need the following: 

• a working title that sums up the spirit of the film; 

• a written synopsis; 

• biographies of crew and actors; and 

• background information about the project. 

A graphic image to identify your project is helpful but not absolutely 
necessary. 

Press materials early in your project will be simple. You will add to 
them as you go along. Get biographies and head shots from personnel as 
you hire them. Begin keeping files of funding information, credits, and 
notes about the shooting. Learn how to write a press release that imparts 
the necessary information of who, what, why, where, and when. Make a 
time-line with realistic deadlines and above all, TAKE PHO- 
TOGRAPHS! 

Good Photos Beget Good Coverage 

The single most important 
thing you must do is to have a 
good photographer on the set. 
So many filmmakers forget 
about stills until the film is set 
to open. Then they have to use 
frame blow-ups or scurry 
around to come up with some- 
thing suitable. In some cases, as 
happened with Visions of the 
Spirit, a documentary about 
Alice Walker, or the several 
films about Jack Kerouac, we 
were able to overcome the lack 
of production stills by using 
photos of the subjects of the 
documentaries. Most of the 
time this simply will not work. 
Competition for space in the 
print media is fierce, and you 
need to have at least as good a 
shot as everyone else. If you 
have great photos, you arc- 
almost guaranteed calendar 
listings, providing you make 
deadlines. 
Your photographer should take 
color slides and black-and-white photographs. Color slides are for "slick" 
magazines, posters, postcards, brochures, and some newspapers. More 
and more newspapers are using color. While color is more expensive, it 
attracts more attention and may get your story or review on the cover or 
the image above the masthead on the front page. Black-and-whites are 
tor most newspapers and all other print media. There is no point in tak- 
ing color prints except for your scrapbook — print sources will not use 
them. Do not expect to get usable black-and-whiu-s from color slides. It 
may seem like a way to saw money, but all too often the result is ,\ muddy 
print. 

Your stills should he shots ot actual s L enes from the film taken during 
production. Budget for a good photographer who knows how to shoot 
well-composed production stills. Ideally, the photographer would be n\- 
the set all the time in ca-e something wonderful happens. In the int 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 27 



of economy, save the photographer for the important days when there is 
a hig scene scheduled with the principals, a well-known person is visiting 
the set, or a visually gripping shot is likely to occur. Photos of the direc- 
tor and crew working are useful to have for trade publications, but oth- 
erwise are not that important. One last piece of advice: Do not shoot your 
own stills. Even if you are a proficient still photographer, you will not have 
the time to concentrate on getting the right kind of shots. 

To successfully promote your film, you will need at the very least: VHS 
videotapes, stills, and press kits. One-sheets, postcards, and flyers are 
optional, although I would encourage all of them for more coverage in 
venues like coffee shops, bookstores, theaters, etc. An asset for television 
stations is to have a 3/4" or Betacam clip -reel to accompany interviews 
or reviews. Without clips, television coverage is unlikely. Producers' rep 
Peter Moore says, "Don't economize on materials, especially stills. After 
all, you wouldn't build a half-million dollar house and then give it a 
crummy paint job." 

Getting Advance Press 

There are things the filmmaker can do while the production is under way 
that will help attract coverage. If you can interest a national magazine 
like Entertainment Weekly in doing a feature on the making of your film or 
running an advance in a "What's New" column, this would greatly 
increase public awareness and create enthusiasm on a national level. 

Keep production notes and assign yourself or someone else the task of 
getting a few local stories during shooting. These types of "local boy 
makes good" or "guess what's happening on Main Street" stories are espe- 
cially easy to generate in a small town where news is scarce. When the 
stories appear, photocopy and add them to your growing press packet. 
Major pieces may end up in the final press packet. 

While in production keep making media contacts that will prove use- 
ful later on. Remember who you talked with and keep them informed 
with releases and phone calls. Stay in touch with your local Variety cor- 
respondent and with other trade publications. The trades are sometimes 
interested in stories about who got a grant to make this or that project. 

Design an overall look for your film while you are in production. If you 
do not have a bold graphic or logo, make something simple with the title 
of the film at the top of the page. Work on developing a style in present- 
ing yourself and the film. This will help to identify you to the press person 
who gets tons of mail each day. 

Presenting Your Film to the Press 

If you have followed the instructions above, when the film is completed 
you will have the makings of a good press packet. You will have a selec- 
tion of stills from which you can choose three or four to make multiple 
copies, and you will have other stills to give to papers and magazines that 
want an exclusive photo. You will also have a synopsis of the film, pro- 
duction notes, a full credit list of cast and crew, biographies of key actors 
and personnel, special credits such as music, and, if your film is a docu- 
mentary, information about the person or event portrayed. You will make 
a few 1/2" videotapes for those who cannot attend a press screening, and 
3/4" or Betacam clips for television coverage. 

Stills should be labeled with the name of the film, the names of those 
shown, the photographer's credit, and a "please return to" with an 
address. Tapes should be labeled with the name of the film on the cas- 
sette and the box, as well as a "please return to." With clips, identify each 
briefly and give the length in minutes and seconds. 



Whoever publicizes your film is your liaison to the press. This person 
must be at a telephone or have a machine where messages are picked up 
regularly — no less than twice a day. Often a newspaper writer calls in the 
middle of his story and needs a quick answer or stills for a deadline. 
Writers for the dailies, in particular, are used to a quick response. A delay 
could cost you the piece, which is one of the cases for hiring a profes- 
sional publicist whose job is to be available to the press at all times. 

If you are doing your own publicity, prepare a short spiel about your 
project. Be able to define quickly how your film is different from all oth- 
ers. Media people have a short attention span. Because they are over- 
worked and busy, if you cannot make your point succinctly they are less 
likely to be interested. It is not uncommon to have a film reviewer or edi- 
tor say something like, "You have exactly thirty seconds to convince me 
that I should cover this." 



Opening a Film 



When your film is about to open theatrically, you must decide whether 
to screen it for the press. If the print is ready and looks much better on 
a screen than a VCR, you will want to press-screen. A screening two 
weeks before the opening will allow the reviewer to make the deadlines 
of weekly newspapers. In order to get some earlier pieces in magazines or 
papers with long lead times, such as the Sunday entertainment sections 
of most city newspapers, you will either have an earlier screening or show 
the film on 1/2" videocassette to those writers. You can also show your 
VHS screener copy to reviewers who cannot make the press screening. 

If your piece is shot on video and intended for television, you might 
decide to play it theatrically to garner interest and publicity. If your goal 
is to attract PBS and/or video sales, then show the work on a large screen 
at a local theater. This might generate a Sunday piece in the newspaper 
and reviews in the dailies and weeklies. With these tearsheets in hand, 
you can try to convince PBS to air your tape. When the video later plays 
on PBS, it will be reviewed in the same papers, this time by the televi- 
sion reviewers. George Csicsery opened Where the Heart Roams to a lot 
of attention from the media and used that coverage to get a distributor. 
Your goals might be different; the important thing is to define them, then 
strategize from there. 

The more available a filmmaker and/or actors can make themselves 
for promotion of a film, the better. It is relatively easy to arrange radio 
interviews with directors, screenwriters, actors, etc., and it is free public- 
ity. The same applies to print media. Be sure to have a photograph of 
anyone being interviewed, because quite often newspapers ask for one. 
Photos can be hard to find at the last minute. It is always a plus for cov- 
erage if the filmmakers can be present on opening night, adding that spe- 
cial touch to the festivities. 

Another option is to hold a press conference. If you have a film like 
Houses Full of Smoke, about U.S. covert operations in Central America, 
and former spy Philip Agee is in town, holding a press conference will 
attract more attention to the film. You should only hold a press confer- 
ence if it is news. Rama Wiener of Tara Releasing scheduled the New 
York opening of Connie Field and Marilyn Mulford's civil rights docu- 
mentary Freedom on My Mind during the reunion of the summer volun- 
teers in Mississippi exactly 30 years after the murders of Goodman, 
Schwerner, and Chaney. This helped Wiener secure feature news stories 
in addition to reviews and interviews with the filmmakers. 



28 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



To Hire or Not to Hire 

What are the pros and cons of actually hiring 
a publicist for your project/ What a publicist 
can do, how you work with one, and how 
much it costs are some of the areas to explore. 
A publicist can advise you at the strategy stage 
and work with you on your publicity plan. A 
publicist knows deadlines and has media con- 
tacts you do not have. You can discuss with 
your publicist whether to play in a festival or 
open theatrically, whether to try for a PBS air- 
ing or the educational market. The publicist 
can also discuss strategy for promotional tie- 
ins such as T-shirts, postcards, stickers, but- 
tons, flyers, and radio ticket giveaways. A pub- 
licist can help point out that special 
cost-effective item that can attract attention. 
For example, Tara Releasing's The Secret 
Adventures of Tom Thumb made 
glow-in-the-dark spider rings for audience 
giveaways. The rings cost only a penny each! 

Doing publicity means wading through an 
enormous number of functionaries — editors, 
producers, public affairs directors, calendar 
editors, feature writers, television and film 
critics, radio disc jockeys, reporters, and free- 
lancers. The publicist can answer questions 
concerning who should be contacted and 
when, who is on vacation, who just did a sim- 
ilar story, what materials should be sent, when 
screenings should be scheduled and releases 
sent out. 

Publicists talk to other publicists and often 
this leads to new ideas. For instance, I was 
opening Daniel Bergman's Sunday's Children in 
San Francisco. He was not available for inter- 
views so I called Kahn and Jacobs who had 
handled the film in New York. They suggested 
several writers who had conducted interviews 

with Bergman but had not placed them. One of these worked out and 
resulted in a Sunday interview piece. 

A publicist can talk about a film in ways the filmmaker might find dif- 
ficult. Often it is hard for a filmmaker to sing his or her own praises, but 
the publicist can get away with it. Facts must be accurate and well-doc- 
umented, phone calls must be returned promptly, and one must have a 
pleasant manner. The publicist works with this in mind. 

Coverage usually depends on newsworthiness, interest, timeliness, 
and human interest. It is the publicist's job to convince the proper per- 
son, wiiln nit belaboring the point, that his story fulfills some of these 
requirements. Publicists are not necessarily treated gently by the press, 
but it materials are presented well and have something pertinent to say, 
and the publicist is polite, punctual, and tenacious, publicity will result, 
ll you decide to hire one, do so in enough time that they will he able to 
make deadlines. Ideally, a publicist would he on board jour months before 
the first showing, thereby leaving enough time to get a story into the 
national magazines. Hiring the publicist at the beginning of the produc- 




tion would be even better. The publicist could function as a consultant 
during production and he hired later to open the film. 

How do you know whom to hire.' Ask other filmmakers whom they 
recommend. Look in the papers, notice campaigns that seem to be work- 
ing and find out who is doing the publicity. Ask local film organizations. 
Ask reviewers who they like to work with. Interview all oi those recom- 
mended and find out their rates. Ask publicists what they would do lor 
you and determine their interest and availability'. It would be better to 
hire a person with experience who cares about your project even though 
he/she charges a bit more, than to hire an inexperienced person who 
would work for less money and probably get less coverage. 

One solution for those on tighter budgets is to hire an experienced 
publicist as a consultant and have a less experienced person act as an 
assistant making press kits, stuffing envelopes, and even calling press peo- 
ple. Recently Lynn I lershmann-Lccson paid me a consulting fee to meet 
with her assistant and walk him through the writing aid plac ingot a pre-- 
release about an award she won. I went over the release, made son, 
gestions, and basically told him who to send it to and how to follow up. 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 29 



Several weeks later I was delighted to see a news story about the award 
in our daily paper. Filmmakers can save money by writing their own press 
materials, putting together the press packet, labeling stills and tapes, 
stuffing press releases, and buying supplies. Then you can hire the publi- 
cist to set up screenings and interviews and get major stories. 

All publicists have their own styles. The bottom line is that you must 
like the person you choose and feel that he/she is the best person for the 
job. Remember that the publicist is working for you. If you are unhappy 
with some aspect of the publicist's work, do not go along with it. Lizzie 
Borden told me that one of the regional publicists working on Working 
Girls used stills that Borden did not like. I told her that she didn't have 
to accept that, and when I worked on the film in San Francisco we used 
the stills Borden picked herself. 

Even if your film has a distributor who hires a publicist, call that per- 
son and discuss your ideas about how to present the film. You will both 
feel better afterwards. In the event your film is in a festival, I recommend 



I contain a compelling image that also summarizes 
I sixties scene used to promote Mark Kitchell's series 
Berkeley in the Sixties, 




calling the festival's publicist, introducing yourself and making sure they 
know your goals and also that they have all the stills and written materi- 
als they need. If the film is scheduled for television, I would not leave 
anything to chance. Again, call the publicist and ask if there is anything 
you can do to help. Naturally, if you are polite and helpful you will get 
more attention from that publicist, who is likely handling a lot of other 
projects at the same time. If you do decide to hire someone, you need to 
be aware of what they are doing and how they are doing it. The rela- 
tionship between you and your publicist is extremely important. 

If you decide not to use a publicist, you must build your own contacts 
with the press. Start by going to the library or to film organizations. Many 
of them have lists of media people, their areas of interest, and their dead- 
lines. In San Francisco, KNBR radio publishes a list of radio and TV sta- 
tions with names of personnel at each station and information such as 
what length PSAs they air. Carefully scan every publication you find. If it 
covers film and video, put it on your press list. Listen to the radio, watch 
TV, and notice who is doing what. Ask people you know who they think 



might cover your story. Out of all this you will begin to have a personal- 
ized list for your project. Remember to include reviewers, editors, calen- 
dar people, feature writers, freelancers, television and radio personnel. 

To ensure a successful opening you must do outreach to the commu- 
nities that have an interest in your project. Marc Huestis' Sex Is.... and 
Arthur Dong's Coming Out Under Fire must be reviewed in the gay 
papers. Saviors of the Forest by Santa Cruz's Camera Guys should be writ- 
ten up in the Sierra Club Bulletin; Yale Strom's The Last Klezmer must be 
reviewed in The Jewish Bulletin] information about Barry Minott's Harry 
Bridges should be sent to labor journals. You must be creative if you want 
the widest possible audience to see your film. 

When I worked on Black to the Promised Land, I enlisted the help of 
the education coordinator for the San Francisco Film Society, Robert 
Dunn. He worked with me on reaching teachers and students. We set up 
a special screening for several classrooms, invited the press to partici- 
pate, and from that garnered additional news coverage on radio and tele- 
vision and a feature story in The Jewish Bulletin. If you see a story about 
a topic similar to yours, call the writer. Be prepared to explain how your 
project is different and how it is alike. Be consistent, make deadlines, be 
succinct, and be available to the press by phone or message machine. 
Don't take anything for granted even if the reviewer is your best friend. 
Keep in mind that the reviewer has an editor who must also be con- 
vinced to run the story. 

Budgeting for Publicity 

Money for publicity should be included in the budget at the fundraising 
stage. By the time the project is completed often there is no money left 
for publicity. I encourage you to put a certain amount of money under 
lock and key until the right moment. Early planning can also save costs. 
Anticipating needs for packets and stills means that money can be saved 
by copying large quantities of these materials as well as posters, post- 
cards, stationery, and envelopes. Other expenses to consider are flyers, 
postage, phone calls, messenger services, and tape duplication. 

In 1993 and 1994 Irving Saraf and Allie Light's very successful 
Dialogues with Madwomen played in 40 cities, 35 festivals, and on PBS 
(PO.V). They spent $16,583 for the national publicity effort. Here is a 
breakdown of the expenses: 



Posters (full size & color, design, 
separations & printing) 
Press kits 
Publicity photos 
Flyers (4 different kinds) 
VHS viewing cassettes 
Ads (design and litho reproduction) 
35-mm theatrical trailer (15 copies) 
Preview room rental 
TV spots 
Publicist's services 

Total 



$4,489 
339 
782 
438 
818 
295 

3,702 

175 

90 

5.455 

$16,583 



Saraf told me that all of the expenses were important. He and Light 
used 550 posters and were greeted by them in festivals all over the world. 
They still have an occasional use for them. In Saraf's opinion, 35mm 
theatrical trailers are the cheapest form of advertising and filmmakers 
should definitely make them. Saraf adds that you should order at least 
100 viewing cassettes to start with, maybe even 200, and that you should 



30 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



not expect to get them back. (I disagree; if you label cassettes as I sug- 
gested, you should get some of them back.) 

Irving's figures do not include advertising costs that were deducted by 
theaters from the producer's share, telephone calls, shipping, festival 
expenses, and cost of film prints. Telephone and shipping expenses were 
buried in the costs of distribution. Also, they saved money by editing 
their own theatrical trailer and TV spots, and designing and producing 
the press kits. 

I handled the publicity for Dialogues with Madwomen in San 
Francisco, beginning with a sold-out benefit at the 1,500 seat Castro 
Theater for the San Francisco Women's Building, theatrical engage- 
ments at the Castro and UC Theaters, and at the Nuart Theater in Los 
Angeles. The film was a huge success partly because of the very careful 
strategy on the part of the filmmakers all the way along. After the open- 
ings in San Francisco and Los Angeles, Sande Zeig booked the film 
across the country and Lawrence Helman and Marc Huestis of Outsider 
Productions handled publicity duties. 

Tara Releasing's Rama Wiener echoes the need for the materials that 
Saraf lists above. In the interest of keeping costs down, she feels it is 
important to invest the money for a lot of materials early to avoid cost- 
ly reorders later. Tara always prints full-size posters. For Freedom on M} 
Mind, where a four-color poster seemed unnecessary, they printed 2,000 
posters in black-and-white with red for $2,000. Another poster option is 
to make blueprints from a full-sized film positive. The film costs about 
$50 and the blueprints are about $3 each (there is no minimum order, 
and our office gets a price break by doing the labor). As 8" x 10" black- 
and-white stills cost approximately one dollar apiece, Tara orders lithos 
of their publicity stills (with the captions, company name, and other per- 
tinent information) from a lab in the Midwest in lots of 500 for $70 
including tax and shipping. 

Wiener believes that it also helps to create ad slicks. There is a high 
minimum order — 200 for $85 — but ad slicks can also be used to gener- 
ate flyers and postcards. Postcards are inexpensive and effective adver- 
tising, especially if there is a nice image for the front. The back can have 
all the pertinent information and a four-star quote (if available). Cards 
can be customized by labels with specific theaters and playdates (hand 
highlighting the dates always helps). Rama also thinks that 3/4" clip 
reels are very important, even though they cost $40 apiece. Usually five 
clip reels will suffice, and you will keep the price down if you keep the 
time under 10 minutes. Shop around; there are bargains to be found. 

The cost of a publicist varies from city to city, with New York being 
the highest, Los Angeles in the middle, and San Francisco and Seattle 
at the low end. In San Francisco, you should expect to pay about $2,500 
for publicist fees and other expenses to open a film. In Los Angeles the 
amount doubles and in New York it triples. The cost of screening rooms 
in San Francisco varies from $75 to $95 an hour. In New York, rooms 
start at $100 per hour. Every cost is greater in New York, so if you are 
opening there you have to take that into consideration. 

Unit publicists, who garner press for the film while it is in production, 
are usually paid by the week, while publicists hired to open a film are 
usually paid by the project — $800 to $1,200 in San Francisco. You could 
consider hiring a publicist as a consultant for an hourly fee of $50 to 
$100 per hour in San Francisco. Given an hour, a competent publicist 
can look over your materials and give advice as to how to target the 
right audience and who in the press might be interested. 



The Future Is Coming 

Any current discussion of publicity would be incomplete without a brief 
discussion on how the information superhighway and other new tech- 
nologies are impacting media and the publicist's job. The ability to trans- 
fer or access information instantly on the Internet has enormous poten- 
tial to make everyone's lives a lot easier and coverage a great deal more 
efficient. Just as faxing became commonplace in the late eighties, being 
on-line may well be the publicity standard as we enter the twenty-first 
century. 

Imagine the following scenario. The editor of the largest daily news- 
paper calls you on deadline for tomorrow's paper and cannot find the 
stills you sent the previous week. You frantically search your cluttered 
desk for one of your production stills. You cannot find the one that would 
be perfect, so you send your second, or maybe even your third choice by 
messenger and hope for the best. Ten minutes later the paper calls to fact- 
check the playdates of your film. They cannot find your release, so you 
answer the questions and fax another release. 

The time is coming when this scenario might be replaced by the fol- 
lowing: The editor calls to discuss coverage and images. You mention that 
you can provide eight images in a digital (TIFF) file format sent via e- 
mail, in either color or black-and-white. As for those fact checkers, they 
will have gone to the local indie film bulletin board on the Internet where 
you have posted your release and press kit for the media's convenience. 
Your main press list will already have received the materials and any spe- 
cific requests in their individual e-mail boxes. 

As ideal as this all sounds, with modems and CD-ROMs replacing 
photos, slides, and press kits — saving dollars and trees — this reality is still 
several years away. According to San Francisco Examiner film critic Scott 
Rosenberg, "There's an incredible logic to the on-line approach. It's the 
older editors that are holding up progress." Rosenberg prefers e-mail to 
voice mail, and now receives some of his press releases electronically. 

Although the new computer on-line technology has become a factor 
in conventional print media, with more and more dailies and weeklies on 
the Internet, it is still essential for the independent filmmaker to provide 
press materials in the current conventional standards. According to San 
Francisco publicist Jeff Diamond, some publicists are now posting releas- 
es in various on-line news groups and running ticket giveaways on bul- 
letin boards with no appreciable response as yet. 

Larger studios and some independents have provided publicists with 
Electronic Press Kits (EPKs) for the past several years. These kits usually 
include: 3/4" clips of scenes from the film; a trailer; B-roll footage of 
director, crew, etc.; and a music video if there is a hit song in the film with 
potential MTV airplay. 

The time is not far off when the learning curve will disappear. As the 
price of equipment falls, scanners could be commonplace, modems are 
already a necessity, CD-ROMs will be cheaper to produce than photos, 
and filmmakers who are currently editing digitally will find n even easier 
to develop electronic press materials. Re prepared and the new technol- 
ogy will make your life easier. For now, make sure you make Ml ol your 
snail-mail deadlines with the appropriate photos for calendar listings, and 
don't forget those follow-up calls! 

Karen Larsen heads her own San FranciscO'based publu relations firm spa ializing m 
independent feature and documentary films, film festivals, and spa ial e\ ents. 

This article is reprinted from The Next Step: Distributing Independent \ Urn 
and Video, edited by Morrie Warshawski and available through the 
Foundation tor Independent Video and Film [see p. 10 for book orders] 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 31 




SUBURBIA'S MEAN STREETS 



An interview with Jim McKay and Lauren Zalaznick 



ENTER GIRLS TOWN 




32 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



by Dana Harris 

Girls Town is like no coming-of-age film you've seen. In the world 
of best friends Emma, Nikki, Patti, and Angela, sex is a given. 
Patti has to pick up her baby at the high school day- care center. 
Drugs are no big deal; a joint is saved for "after school," as if it 
were a cupcake in a lunchbox. But for all their modern-day non- 
chalance, these street-smart women still keep quiet about certain 
subjects. Acquaintance rape is one of them. Tragically for one 
teen, that silence leads to suicide. 

As the remaining trio tries to sort out their friend's life after 
discovering her diary and the full story of her rape, they realize 
the fear of speaking out could also kill them spiritually, if not 
mortally. As they put this knowledge into action, they begin to 
get a sense of their own voices and the impact they can have on 
their worlds. 

Director/co-creator Jim McKay, who frankly describes Girls 
Town as "a feminist film," got his start shooting music videos for 
the likes of REM, as well as producing an award-winning series of 
public service announcements about such topical issues as sexu- 
al harassment, chemical pesticides, and historic preservation 

under the banner Direct Effect. 
Producer Lauren Zalaznick is 
fresh from her success produc- 
ing Todd Haynes's Safe and 
Larry Clarke's Kids. While both 
McKay and Zalaznick have 
their cutting-edge chops, it's 
the collaborative process they 
used to create Girls Town that 
makes it such an extrordinary 
production. 

McKay and his actors — Anna 
Grace (Emma), Bruklin Harris 
(Angela), Lili Taylor (Patti), and Denise Hernandez (Nikki) — 
share screenwriting credit, thanks to the intense improvisation 
workshops that shaped the script. The result is a film that's as 
disquieting in its subject matter as in its style, which demon- 
strates a razor-edge awareness. Watching Girls Town feels like 
you're inadvertently eavesdropping on these girls' lives, but it's so 
fascinating you can't force yourself to mind your own business. 

At Sundance, Girls Town won the dramatic Filmmaker's 
Trophy and a special Jury prize for its improvisational techniques. 
Not long after they found out that Girls Town had been selected 
for Sundance and while they were in the midst of negotiations 
with October Films (which is releasing the film in August), 
McKay and Zalaznick met with me in a SoHo coffee shop. We 
talked about how they joined forces for Girls Town, the film's cre- 
ative process, and — of course — how they managed to scrape the 
money together. The two have an easy rapport that leads to them 
completing each other's sentences, and turns an interview into a 
pleasure. I started things off by asking for the short-answer ver- 
sion of how they reached this point in their careers. 

Facing page, top: Gal pals II. to r.| Angela (Bruklin Harris), Emma (Anna Grace), Nikki 

(Denise Hernandez), and Patti (Lili Taylor) in Girls Town. 

Film stills courtesy October Films. Above photos: Patricia Thomson 




Lauren Zalaznick: I started out as a little person in big movies 
right after college. Then I got disgusted and crazy, did nothing, 
and, through a long, funny period of coincidences and six degrees 
of separation, ended up working with [producer] Christine 
Vachon on Poison. I'll just give you the punchline: at lunch one 
day, Christine and I were dancing around the fact that she had 
way too much to do and no one to do it, and I couldn't get a job 
in low-budget film because I'd only done big films. At the end of 
that lunch, she proceeded very nicely to offer to share her $200 
per week salary with me, if I would production-manage while she 
assistant-directed the film. 

The Independent: Very generous. 

Zalaznick: That started a long partnership of Christine and me. 
We did [Todd Haynes's] Poison, [Tom Kalin's] Swoon, and Todd's 
next short, Dottie Gets Spanked. That went all the way through 
last summer with Safe and Kids. To support myself in between low- 
budget films, I've always had a hand in commercials and televi- 
sion. I now have a full-time job at VH-1 [Creative Director and 
VP On- Air Promotions] . Somewhere along the line I met Jim — 
actually, a really long time ago — and some years later he had this 
project, called me, and a mere 
three years later we did it. 

McKay: I come out of music 
videos. That's what I've done 
for the last seven or eight years 
to make a living. I'd never 
made a narrative before this. 
I'm very connected to music — 
I played in bands and started 
doing videos for bands I knew. I 
didn't go to film school, [but] 
taught myself while I worked. 
The first thing I ever did was a documentary about eight years ago 
called Lighthearted Nation. That was on video and I shot it all 
myself, cut it myself, taught myself through that. I shot it in New 
York State and Boston and edited it over the course of three years 
in Georgia, D.C., and Pennsylvania — I was moving around a lot. 
I moved back to New York three years ago and had an experi- 
ence trying to raise money for a bigger movie that I was supposed 
to direct (Desperation Angels) that my friend Tom Gilroy wrote 
and my partner in my old film company, Michael Stipe, was going 
to executive produce with Oliver Stone. We looked for money for 
a year or more, and nothing was happening. We went through the 
whole [financing] thing; I really learned a lot aboul how to do 
that, which basically boiled down to "Do it yourself." 

Zalaznick: You left out the whole Direct Effect thing. 

McKay: Direct Effect was a series of public service announce- 
ments that I executive produced with Michael and Tom. We did 
21 over the course of three or tour years... 

Zalaznick: Totally unsponsored. 

McKay. Yeah. Kind of alternative public service announcements, 

I guess. That's how I met Lauren. She called because her produ( - 
tion company had made a spot... 




April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 33 




Zalaznick: I forgot about that. 

McKay: We compared notes. I shared what little information we 
had about getting on MTV and stuff like that. 

Many years later I came to Lauren asking if she was interested 
in line -producing Desperation Angels if we got the money, so we 
made contact one more time. Finally, I realized that wasn't going 
to happen and I thought, "I have an idea of my own, and I want 
to do it this a very different way," and I went to Lauren right away. 
I told her I wanted someone as producer on this from the very 
beginning, because it's going to be a very different process and I'm 
going to need help. 

Zalaznick: It was torturous. Safe was taking so long to put togeth- 
er. I distinctly remember having to go to our 10:30 coffee and say 
to Jim, "Tomorrow I have to leave for L.A. for six months [to 
complete Safe]. What are we going to do?" We were just about 
ready to cast. 

McKay: I talked to Lili Taylor about it, because I already knew 
her through friends. She pretty much signed on, and yet we still 
cast for that part. I can't remember why we did that. Maybe we 
felt like she wasn't going to be able to do it because of another 
project, or we thought she should have another part. 



Zalaznick: Both. And we were afraid that maybe having one 
known actor and three unknowns would be weird, and maybe we 
should get people who weren't actors but had experienced some- 
thing similar. We went through every permutation, casting-wise. 

McKay: I should back up a little here. We had a treatment and 
needed to workshop in order to write the script. That's what we 
were casting for. We did an open call for 16- to 21-year-olds and 
had all improv auditions, because that's what the actors were 
going to be expected to do. Bruklin Harris came in on one of the 
first calls. A lot of these people were without agents. The last day 
of the last open call, the last person to come in was Anna Grace. 
We did a series of callbacks... 

Zalaznick: And had a lot of people in different groups, in differ- 
ent arrangements. At that point you started to give them little 
scenarios. 

The Independent: The credits read "Devised and directed by Jim 
McKay," and the screenwriting credit goes to the cast and you. 
How did that develop? Did you come to them with an idea of 
what you wanted a given scene to be about, and then see where 
they could carry it? 

McKay: The treatment was very specific. It was a 24-page outline 



34 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



of a story, and it said, "Scene 2. They do this and say this and this 
happens." But the whole point of doing it in this way was that I 
was open to that completely changing. And, in fact, it did. I 
mean, when I look at the original treatment now, the movie we 
made... 

Zalaznick: It's a different movie. 

McKay: It's nothing like [the treatment]. We spent a good week 
just getting ready, getting to know each other, talking about their 
characters, doing different exercises. It was hard because differ- 
ent actors work different ways. For the first half it was pretty 
painful at times, because we were working on the story, which 
could go anywhere, but at the same we were working on charac- 
ters. We would stop in the middle of a scene and I would say, 
"What would Emma do in this circumstance? It doesn't seem like 
you know where to go here." And Anna would say, "I don't know 
what Emma would do because I don't know who Emma is yet." 

Zalaznick: It was more like playacting than acting in character 
for a long time. 

McKay: And then things blossomed and every time a new bump 
came up in the improv work, it oftentimes would change things 
that happened before. In week three, all of a sudden Lili says, 
"You know, I don't think I listen to heavy metal at all. I think I 
listen just to hip-hop." Which means we have to change this, 
this, and this. 

The Independent: It sounds like you had to have a lot of faith in 
the process. 

McKay: Totally. And I did. I knew I was working with great peo- 
ple. And I had to constantly keep in mind that they were actors 
and not writers — and I wasn't necessarily a full-fledged writer 
myself. We were all working together. By having Lauren there, to 
reflect what we'd been doing and talk about where we were 
going, it was a completely collaborative thing. 

Zalaznick: The actors were extremely strong actors at every step 
of the way, and they were also really smart people who weren't 
acting at certain points. They would step out of their characters 
and ask where the story was going. "Is it working, is it too expect- 
ed, is it too unreal?" Jim really directed them, more than just 
being a sounding board. He had to function as a director instead 
of just saying, "Okay, whatever; what happens, happens." 

The Independent: Wbat was your role in the process? 

Zalaznick: Jim would take what had happened and bring it all to 
me, and I'd be the one to say, "You know, it seems kind of strange 
when they say this after doing this..." That's when Jim would 
become the actor and say, "Yeah, but that's what happened!", 
and I'd say, "Yeah, but it's a movie, it's got to be a story." That's 
how the story and dialogue got molded. We would pore for hours 
over which character was talking which way, and who was an 
interruptive character, and who was a passive character verbally 
but an active character action-wise... 

McKay: There are so many characters "in" the film who are no! 
in the film. We made this huge list of people that they refer to, 
hut you never see. 

Zalaznick: They all had a hackstory. 



McKay: We had a 200-page first draft and 400 pages of transcripts 
from the improvs, but by going that deep and rewriting, it allowed 
us to strip off all this other stuff and retain an unbelievably full life 
for the characters. 

Zalaznick: We Charlie Brown-ized the girl's characters. We made 
them have no parents that you see, no adults, no siblings — but the 
actors knew everything. So when we reduced it to this tight, com- 
pletely insular world — to throw around filmmakers' terms, it's a 
true slice-of-life film. It's also a true ensemble piece. There's no 
real star, and there's no real hero in the dramatic sense. Each 
character is a hero. 

The Independent: Was there an actual script when you started 
shooting? 

McKay: Definitely, although there were probably six scenes or so 
that were improvised on the shoot, and there was a lot of stuff 
written in the week before the shoot. When we got everybody 
together to rehearse for two weeks, the rehearsal really turned 
into another workshop. We knew very clearly there was going to 
be a lot of improv on the set. We had scenes written very specifi- 
cally, but there was still freedom to change lines. 

We had to plan for that in how we shot it. I spent a lot of time 
talking with Russell [Fine, the director of photography] about 
how were were going to do that. The obvious solution was master 
shots that allowed this stuff to play out. It turned out that when 
we were shooting a lot of singles, a lot of coverage, the continuity 
was amazingly good. 

The Independent: What was the genesis of the project? 

McKay: Of all the political labels, I find that I'm a feminist. For 
as little as there is out there for women, there's even less for 
teenage girls, teenage women. There's no legal recourse for girls 
being abused by boyfriends or husbands... 

Zalaznick: Or fathers or teachers... 

McKay: Add to that the whole psychological thing that's going on 
in a teenage person's life. And it's a time of life that's not shown — 
at all. Go to a video store, and you'll find maybe 10 videos that 
deal with a teenage girl's life in a real way. We're talking about a 
huge segment of the population. 

It started out as a girl gang movie. They shared these experi- 
ences they'd had and came to the conclusion that "This is fucked 
up, and what are we gonna do about it?" The workshops brought 
the story to a more organic place, where the experience of sharing 
gave [the characters] the consciousness that led to spontaneous 
acts of retribution, not planned acts. 

I think so much abuse of different sorts goes on in the world, 
and so little retribution happens. There are very human, real rea- 
sons why that doesn't happen, hut it's an interesting question to 
pose: What would happen if retribution were to take place? 
Would that he correct or good? 

The Independent: Here's the question everyone always wants to 
know: How did you get the funding? 

Zalaznick: We were going to start the long, torturous route of 
individual sales, foreign pre-sales, $5,000 from a relative, a friend, 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 35 



whatever. I said to Jim, "I know how long this takes. And I know 
it doesn't make any sense, but I don't think we should wait anoth- 
er year to shoot the movie." 

McKay: We just got tired of waiting and decided to do it our- 
selves. We talked about shooting in Hi8; we were that desperate 
to make it. We did the usual low-budget credit- card-type thing, 
which I'm really not interested in detailing just because it's been 
detailed to death. 

Now that companies know people out there are able to make 
low-budget films for very little money, they're very happy to let 
them make them and buy them cheap. There's something to be 
said for that. I think a lot of films shouldn't be funded, probably 
most of them... 

Zalaznick: And every single filmmaker is saying, "No, but mine is 
really good." 

McKay: If you're really good, you'll figure [financing] out. 

Zalaznick: The bottom line is no one's going to give you money, 
and if you don't want to waste a year of your life finding that out, 
do it yourself. 

I think the later tragedy comes when someone's proven them- 
selves in a first film, and the second film is no easier to fund. If a 
director has a wish to stay out of the studio system and in the 
independent world, it doesn't get any easier. There is no middle 
road. I understand why there are no-budget $200,000 movies, but 
there should be more room than there is for little movies that cost 
$2 million. That's what doesn't exist, from a single funder. 

McKay: Throughout the making of it, tons of people chipped in 
their stuff. 

Zalaznick: Their space, their storage space, their extra paper 
plates, their apartment, their fax machines. On the one hand, 
nobody helped us; we made this happen. On the other hand, 
things like this get made through the proverbial kindness of 
strangers. You get people who show up and work really hard every 
step of the way. It's the people who are outside in the cold with a 
clipboard who are really unbelievable. 

McKay: I'm a believer in a real equality as far as crew goes. I truly 
believe that PAs are just as important as the gaffer. If they didn't 
get the gaffer's lights there, then we'd be screwed. People are real- 
ly tired of working for free, but at least we had an edge in that our 
film was about something. It was painful like every other... 

Zalaznick: Painful, nightmare, nightmare... 

McKay: But it makes so little sense to complain about the 
drudgery of independent filmmaking. It's what it's supposed to be, 
and that's okay. The truth is, I'd rather make my next film exact- 
ly this way. You know, it's the unbelievable joy of this being our 
movie. There's no one telling us what to do. I wouldn't complain 
about it for a million bucks. 

The Independent: What was your shooting schedule? 

McKay: It was a 14-day shoot, but we had three half-days. It was 
really quick. We did 15 pages on our last day. We didn't need 
much rehearsal on set, and we didn't have time or money to go 
longer. We shot in Queens, mostly, and a couple of days in New 
Jersey. The film got a little more citied-out than I originally 



intended. I wanted the film to be Any town, USA... 

Zalaznick: Now it's Anycity, USA. 

McKay: It's funny, older white people who see it say, "Oh, it's an 
inner-city movie." And younger kids see it as suburban. 

The Independent: How much pressure did you feel about getting 
into Sundance? 

McKay: A lot. 

Zalaznick: I truly believe that films break in the place that 
they're meant to break. And if you don't get into Sundance, it's 
Berlin. If it's not Berlin, it's South by Southwest. It's nice when it 
happens, but it doesn't matter. 

McKay: Independent filmmakers have to recognize that getting 



As a result of the improv workshops, the "pay- 
back" actions of Nikki's surviving friends changed 
from premeditated to spontaneous. 

Photo: Phyllis Bilkin 







a big distributor isn't necessarily your end goal. You may wind up 
self-distributing or going with one of the smaller distributors. You 
may have to play just as big a part in getting it seen as you did in 
making it. 

The Independent: Do you have another film in the works? 

McKay: We didn't make this film so we could make another, big- 
ger one; we made it because we really wanted to. We plan to 
spend a lot of time with this film, going to schools with it, going 
to women's groups, and then we'll be ready to make another one, 
probably very much in the same way. We'll be working with actors 
in a workshop situation. 

I'm interested in exploring things that aren't necessarily me. 
There's a lot of realism in portraying women characters who are 
subservient to men, or are underconfident, but I think a lot of 
times portraying that vision is an excuse for a fear of going fur- 
ther. Where are the women who are unbelievably smart and 
articulate and aren't ditzes and who aren't the girlfriend and 
aren't the bitch and aren't the ho? I hope we see a lot more of 
that. I think there's a real void of politicized viewpoints. A large 
part of this film is about breaking the silence of these characters 
and giving them a voice. They're there, and they exist. 

Dana Harris is a filmmaker and a regular contributor to The Independent. She lives 

in Connecticut. 



36 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 







6th Annul I fravity Free Film i Video Ccmi 

Sponsored by The- Vmcm-Vc4\ MvSew and Vayaspn Oablo 

CALL LOC SUBMISSIONS 



ir Entries must be comedy "shorts", 
30 minutes in length — or less. 



"A" Material may be shot on any film or 
video format - but submissions must be 
in 1/2" VHS format for evaluation. 



^ Suitable for cable broadcast 
^k Sound Sync or Silent 



"A' Entries must have been completed 
since January 1, 1990. 

if Live Action or Animated 

* B & W or Color 

SUBMISSION DEADLINE JUNE 1, 1996 

$20 Entry fee for each title submitted. Send SASE if you would like your tape returned. 
CASH PCIZES $250 each for four finalists. $250 More for Juror's Award and 
Popular Pick Award. Prizes awarded at Festival: travel allowance provided 

JUDDRS A representative from Comedy Central * Jay Craven, filmmaker, Where the 
Rivers Flow North * Dr. Scott G. Isaksen, Dir. of Studies in Creativity, Buffalo State College 

TC ENTER Send video(s) and Entry Fee(s) to: THE GRAVITY FREE FILM FESTIVAL 
116 EAST THIRD STREET * JAMESTOWN, NY 14701* 716-664-2465 * FAX 716-661-3829 



ITVS congratulates 

Jl!k l Y.!?P.(fMS.&.PaY.id.Sj.nipsojn : 
produrare/directorepf 



WH X . -Y 



in? a: his 



H H A J 



AXI1 OTHHU TA 



UK WHNUHH 



.p.n.lh®ir.l?.?^.^MPp.nl.P9!ly.!iibi.a.. 

|6l.6yMon.ipumalism. 



THE INDEPENDENT TELEVISION SERVICE 



612/225-9035 



,MtR://.WW.!S:i}.X?.9.C3£'.T.Y.?.. 

Public Television for a Change 




8TH SOUTHEASTERN MEDIA INSTITUTE 




Reduced 
registration fees 
available 
through June 3. 



Columbia, South Carolina June 15 - 23, 1996 

Intensive, hands-on media production experience in small, 
weekend and week-long workshops. 

• Screenwriting 

• Digital Editing 

• Location Production 

• Hi8 to Broadcast 

• Multimedia, CD -ROM and the Internet 

• Marketing/Distribution 

• Film Criticism 

Join leading industry professionals including Hollywood screen- 
writer Michael Minor (ROBOCOP); ITVS Award winners Ellen 
Spiro, Zeinabu irene Davis, Andrew Garrison and Kathe Sandler; 
and international film critic Scott McDonald, author of AVANT- 
GARDE FILM: MOTION STUDIES. 

For a brochure contact. Southeastern Media Institute, South Carolina Arts 
Commission, 1800 Gervais Street, Columbia, South Carolina, 29201. 
Phone: (803) 734-8696. Fax: (803) 734-8526. e-mail: mswisher@scsn.net 




Negotiating 
the Nontheatrical 
Distribution Deal 



by Robert L. Seigel 

"Deal-making" in the film world generally con- 
jures up images of feature film producers ham- 
mering out contracts with distributors for a 
theatrical run. But film- and videomakers aim- 
ing for the educational market have to brush 
up on their negotiating skills, too. Although 
the process of securing a nontheatrical distrib- 
ution deal may not seem as elaborate, produc- 
ers still have to do their homework when 
selecting a distributor and bargaining for the 
best possible terms. 

Regardless of whether you approach a dis- 
tributor or vice versa, you should get the dis- 
tributor's catalog and samples of marketing 
materials to develop some sense of how the 
company markets its work, especially projects 
that fall under the same general category as 
your film or tape. You can also see whether 
other titles in the distributor's library will com- 
pete with or complement your project. 

Producers often find it helpful to get in 
touch with other filmmakers signed with a dis- 
tributor to ask specific questions about current 
sales and marketing strategies, royalty state- 
ments, and the frequency and extent of com- 
munications between the distributor and pro- 
ducer. It is also useful to contact companies 
that have bought programs from distributors. 
This investigation process begins prior to dis- 
cussions with potential distributors and contin- 
ues throughout. 

Once you have narrowed the field of candi- 
dates, distributors will send the "standard" 
contract, which is usually the starting point for 
negotiations. Although the negotiation process 
is not as varied or prolonged for nontheatrical 
as it is for theatrical films, a producer does have 
some bargaining flexibility when negotiating 



"deal points." Key deal points include (a) what 
media rights will be granted to the distributor, 
(b) what territory or territories the agreement 
will cover, (c) whether the agreement will be 
exclusive or nonexclusive, and (d) how long 
the agreement will last. 

Producers first need to understand that the 
nontheatrical market comprises many venues. 
Your agreement should be as specific as possi- 
ble and include examples when defining the 
term "nontheatrical" (e.g., "exhibition or use in 
schools, colleges, public libraries, business and 
industry, hospitals or other medical institu- 
tions, screening on oil tankers, military bases, 
aircraft or ships flying the flag or registered in 
the United States, its territories, or posses- 
sions"). If possible, the agreement should also 
define the term "educational" (e.g., closed-cir- 
cuit, classroom or independent study, or use by 
nonprofit organizations or institutions) . 

When discussing which media rights will be 
granted, such as nontheatrical, broadcast tele- 
vision, or home video, the producer and dis- 
tributor should state in detail the scope of 
rights within a particular medium. For 
instance, does "video" include videocassettes, 
laser discs, and all other audio-visual devices? 
Does "television" encompass commercial 
broadcast, public television, pay and basic 
cable, and direct broadcast satellite? Producers 
should also be aware of whether the contract 
grants rights to home video and other media 
(i.e., multimedia and interactive) to the dis- 
tributor. 

The agreement must also address the issue 
of which territories should be granted — e.g., 
United States, North America, Europe, world- 
wide. Any territories or media not expressly 
granted to a distributor should be deemed as 
reserved by the producer. 



Another decision to consider is whether to 
enter into an exclusive or nonexclusive deal. 
Producers often enter into exclusive deals if 
the projects can be targeted successfully to a 
specific market, are specialized in nature, and 
can be marketed to conventional educational 
outlets — public schools, state and private uni- 
versities, public libraries — which often have 
sufficient funds to purchase a videocassette in 
the $100 to $300 per half-hour range. 

The term for an exclusive arrangement is 
approximately three to seven years and the 
distributor's responsibilities often include 
making dubs from the master (which the pro- 
ducer owns), coordinating marketing and pro- 
motion, billing, and the submission of royalty 
statements and checks to a producer on a 
quarterly or semi-annual basis. The fruits of 
the distributor's labor often will not be borne 
out until anywhere from 15 months to three 
years from the time the project first appears in 
a catalog, since the distributor generally pays 
all of the distribution costs (e.g., order fulfill- 
ment, administrative costs, promotion, and 
marketing), which are often incurred in the 
first year of the agreement. 

When entering into an exclusive deal, you 
should make sure the distributor specifies how 
the project will be promoted: through the dis- 
tributor's catalog, a specialized brochure, sub- 
mission to festivals and markets such as the 
National Media Education Network, pursuit 
of reviews in noted industry publications, and 
so on. Other points that the producer and dis- 
tributor should address are whether a poten- 
tial purchaser can preview a project, return 
and refund policies, and, if relevant, details 
regarding an accompanying study guide. 

Exclusive agreements are generally renew- 
ed on a year-to-year or multi-year basis unless 



38 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



one party (usually the producer) provides 
written notice of termination within a speci- 
fied period. You should attempt to prevent or 
limit automatic renewals. Instead, negotiate 
for a provision in which a party may terminate 
or not renew an agreement either "for cause" 
(e.g., a distributor's failure to sell a certain 
number of units or generate a certain amount 
of sales) or simply because a party wishes to. 

Nonexclusive agreements usually have a 
one -year term, which is generally renewable 
automatically but can be terminated by either 
party upon 30 to 60 days prior written notice. 
Unlike exclusive deals, nonexclusive deals 
require the producer to keep the dubbing mas- 
ter, have dubs made from the lab, and provide 
packaging and marketing materials at his or 
her own expense, as well as sell copies or units 
of the work to multiple dealers, wholesalers, 
or cataloguers. These nonexclusive dealers, 
wholesalers, and catalogs buy tapes upfront, or 
when orders have to be 
fulfilled by them, at 
approximately 40 to 60 
percent less than the list 
price. The key marketing 
tools in a nonexclusive 
arrangement are the sell- 
er's catalog and any pro- 
motional materials pre- 
pared by the producer. 
Nonexclusive distribu- 



tion arrangements are 

preferable for products 

suitable for large, broad 

markets that have buyers 

(often consumers) who 

have limited funding and who are outside the 

conventional educational channels, such as 

parenting or sports. 

The issues of unit price and royalties will 
depend on whether the agreement is exclusive 
or nonexclusive. In an exclusive contract, the 
producer's royalties can range from 15 to 30 
percent of the gross. However, make sure the 
contract spells out exactly what is meant by 
"net" or "gross." For certain territories or 
media, many distributors use subdistributors 
who request their own commission and even 
recoupment of expenses. Find out whether 
such subdistributors' commissions are deduct- 
ed from the monies paid to you or whether 
they're included in the distributor's fee. Also 
determine which expenses are deducted 
before you receive your royalty monies. 

In a nonexclusive deal, a producer does not 
receive royalties, but rather a per-unit price 
paid by a dealer or wholesaler (e.g., less than 



Your agreement should be as specific 

as possible and include examples 
when defining the term "nontheatrical" 
(e.g., "exhibition or use in schools, col- 
leges, public libraries, business and 
industry, hospitals or other medical 
institutions, screening on oil tankers, 
military bases, aircraft or ships flying 
the flag or registered in the United 
States, its territories, or possessions"). 



$100 for a 30-minute work). To figure out your 
profit as a producer, deduct from that amount 
the per-unit cost that you will incur for manu- 
facturing, promotion, and other expenses. 

Although a complete discussion of nonthe- 
atrical distribution agreements is beyond the 
scope of this article, there are a number of 
other important deal points you should address. 
These include: 

• the nature of and maximum costs for a pro- 
ject's promotion and marketing; 

• under what circumstance the original work 
will be edited, and by whom; 

• who prepares and pays for master elements 
and prints (if any) ; 

• the producer's right to examine the distribu- 
tor's accounting books; 

• which materials will be returned to the pro- 
ducer upon the expiration or termination of the 
agreement; 

• the reversion of rights to the producer if the 
distributor is insolvent or 
in bankruptcy; 

• the right of a distributor 
to assign the rights to the 
agreement and its obliga- 
tions to third parties; 

• whether an advance on 
sales or a minimum guar- 
anteed payment is to be 
made by the distributor 
(which is a rare occur- 
rence, but which may be 
the only money a produc- 
er will receive for a while 



or at all, since commis- 
sions, fees, and expenses 

may delay or prevent the recoupment of such 

monies) ; 

• legal clearance of all music, film or video 
clips, performances, or other protected materi- 
als contained in the work; 

• the consequences of default by any party; 

• the manner in which disputes and claims will 
be resolved; 

• who pays "Errors &. Omissions" coverage. 

By checking out any potential distributor, 
carefully reviewing any contract, and address- 
ing these deal points, you can lay the ground- 
work for effective negotiation. An attorney can 
help spot issues not covered by such measures. 
However, taking the above steps first can make 
subsequent use of an attorney's services more 
efficient and cost-effective, while protecting 
your interests from the start. 

Robert L. Seigel is a New York City-based entertain- 

merit attorney and a principal m the Cinema Film 

( Umsulting ( hmpany. 



S©W» 



il Component Digitizing 
t Betacum SP, Hi-8, 3/4" 

Up to 4 Hours Source 
7 After Effects, Morph 
* Photoshop, Illustr., Strata 3D 
: Large, Comfortable, Kitchen 
" 8 Channel mixing/sweetening 

Music & SFX Library - 

Archiving 



uumm 

for reservations 
& information 



|AQE 
ANT 



Audio Posf 
Production 



• Films 


• Voice Over 


• Features 


• Digital Editing 


• Shorts 


• Sound design 


• Animation 


• Sound Effects 


• Commercials 


• Inserts 


• Radio 




• Corporate 






April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 39 




What's New in 
Black American 
Film Studies 

by Adam Knee 



Although as recently as 1990 there were rela- 
tively few books available on African- 
American filmmaking, there has now been a 
surge in interest and publishing on the topic. 
Two pioneering works on Black filmmaking 
and Black screen images have recently been 
reissued — Thomas Cripps' Slow Fade to 
Black: The Negro in American Film 1900- 
1942 (Oxford University Press, 1977/1993) 
and Donald Bogle's Toms, Coons, Mulattoes, 
Mammies &. Bucks: An Interpretive History 
of Blacks in American Films (Continuum, 
1973/1994) — while many new studies and 
first-hand accounts of African- American film- 
making have also appeared. In order to gauge 
what kinds of materials are available and use- 
ful, The Independent talked with professors from 
around the country in departments of commu- 
nication, film, English, and African-American 
Studies. 

Both the Bogle and Cripps books — along 
with Cripps's more recent Making Movies 
Black: The Hollywood Message Movie from 
World War II to the Civil Rights Era (Oxford 
UP, 1993) — continue to get high marks from 
teachers. Cripps's work is known for its in- 
depth, original historical research on Black 
involvement in the film industry, while Bogle's 
book offers a readable and comprehensive 
overview that serves well as a college text. 
Another overview recommended by several 
interviewees is Ed Guerrero's Framing 
Blackness: The African American Image in 



Film (Temple UR 1993). Tyrone Williams, an 
associate professor of English at Xavier 
University, recommends the text for the wide 
range of films it examines, both modern and 
historical, commercial and independent, while 
Jesse Rhines, an assistant professor in the 
Department of African and African-American 
Studies at Rutgers, praises its "deconstruction 
of the way African-Americans are imaged by 
whites in the film industry and how in turn 




these images influence the ways Blacks view 
and represent themselves." 

Rhines is particularly interested in tracing 
the complex operations of "Anglo-American 
hegemony" in the film industry; his own forth- 
coming book, Black Film/White Money 
(Rutgers UP), does just this by analyzing the 
economics of the entry of Blacks into 
Hollywood. Rhines examines "how one does or 
does not move from being independent into 
being part of the Hollywood system. How and 
why do some Black filmmakers remain inde- 
pendent? Why are certain Black males getting 
studio financing while certain Black women, 
such as Julie Dash, do not receive the same 
kind of support?" 

For a first-hand account of Black films and 
filmmaking by someone who has been directly 
involved in the industry, both Rhines and 
Arthur Knight, an instructor in American 
studies and English at William and Mary 
College, recommend Nelson George's 
Blackface: Reflections on African-Amer- 
icans and the Movies (Harper Collins, 1994). 
In teaching about the African-American 



reception of American film, Knight also uses 
The Devil Finds Work: An Essay (Dell, 
1976/1990), James Baldwin's personal memoir 
of movie-going experiences. 

For more in-depth critical discussions of 
individual works and specific issues in Black 
filmmaking, Michele Wallace, an associate 
professor of English and women's studies at 
New York's City College and the CUNY 
Graduate Center and the author of 
Invisibility Blues: From Pop to Theory 
(Verso, 1990), recommends, among 
other texts, Manthia Diawara's antholo- 
gy Black American Cinema (Rout- 
ledge, 1993) and a posthumously pub- 
lished collection of essays by James 
Snead titled White Screens/Black 
Images (Routledge, 1994), which deals 
with various ways Blackness has been 
codified in both Hollywood film and 
Black independent film. For a wide- 
ranging theoretical approach to race in 
the media that synthesizes a number of 
differing perspectives, Wallace also rec- 
ommends Ella Shohat and Robert 
Stam's Unthinking Eurocentrism: 
Multiculturalism and the Media 
(Routledge, 1994). On the whole, how- 
ever, Wallace is hardly sanguine about 
the current state of scholarship on 
African-American filmmaking, noting 
that there are many gaps and that in 
particular, "on topics of women, gender, and 
sexuality, it's pretty awful." Shari Roberts, an 
assistant professor of communication at Penn 
State University and author of the forthcom- 
ing Seeing Stars: Spectacles of Difference in 
World War II Hollywood Musicals (Duke 
UP), concurs, and both she and Wallace cite 
bell hooks' Black Looks: Race, Gender and 
Cultural Politics (South End Press, 1992) as 
one of the very few works that focus on issues 
of African- American women's sexuality. 

Sheril Antonio, assistant dean for film and 
television at New York University's Tisch 
School of the Arts, also suggests that despite 
the recent volume of scholarship in the field, 
substantial work remains to be done. "It's real- 
ly very early for critical views on Black film," 
she explains. "We first need to establish a solid 
historical perspective." Thus far, Antonio has 
found the aforementioned Bogle and Diawara 
books, along with Bogle's Blacks in 
American Films and Television: An 
Illustrated Encyclopedia (Fireside, 1989) 
most helpful for teaching: "The Bogle books 
offer a useful historical survey, while the 



40 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



Diawara anthology gives the students a neces- 
sary critical perspective on that history." 

Wallace, who is at work on a book on race in 
early cinema, is likewise adamant about the 
need for more in-depth and rigorous approach- 
es to African-American film history and is 
specifically concerned about "a sanitizing of 
Black history, in which what is connected to 
stereotypes, what is seen as unpleasant, gets set 
aside. The willingness to dismiss certain figures 
and texts is amazing." 

One somewhat controversial figure who is 
being definitively wrested from obscurity is the 
pioneering African-American filmmaker and 
novelist Oscar Micheaux. While much of 
Micheaux's output of more than 40 Black-cast 
films, dating from the silent era, has been lost, 
scholars are now examining his career in detail. 
Jane Gaines, director of the Film and Video 
Program at Duke University, stresses the signif- 
icance of this scholarship for "reconfiguring the 
canon" of texts in film studies: "Through this 
kind of archaeology, we are coming to realize 
more fully the extent of the African-American 
presence in the early years of film production. 
Now, when The Birth of a Nation (1915) is 
taught in film classes, more and more professors 
are also teaching Micheaux's Within Our Gates 



(1919) as a kind of response to Griffith's work." 
Gaines is now co-editing (with Pearl Bowser 
and Charles Musser) an anthology on the 
director's work, entitled Oscar Micheaux and 
His Circle (Smithsonian, forthcoming), and 
several scholars are preparing book-length 
studies of Micheaux as well. 

Lastly, several instructors also make use of 
filmmaking accounts by Black directors them- 
selves, such as Julie Dash's Daughters of the 
Dust: The Making of an African American 
Woman's Film (The New Press, 1992) and 
Spike Lee's By Any Means Necessary: The 
Trials and Tribulations of the Making of 
Malcolm X (with Ralph Wiley; Hyperion, 
1992). In one more indication of the current 
growth in interest on the topic, one of the ear- 
liest and most fascinating personal accounts of 
Black filmmaking, Melvin Van Peebles's The 
Making of Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss 
Song (1972), was reissued last year by Ann 
Arbor's Neo Press, with a new introduction and 
afterword. 

Also of interest: 

Daniel Bernardi, ed., Race and the Emer- 
gence of U.S. Cinema (Rutgers UR 1996). 

Jacqueline Bobo, Black Women as Cultural 
Readers (Columbia UP 1995). 



Gina Dent, ed., Black Popular Culture: A 
Project by Michele Wallace (Bay Press, 1992). 

Five for Five: The Films of Spike Lee 
(Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 1991). 

KrinGabbard, ed., Representing Jazz (Duke 
UR 1995). 

Thelma Golden, ed., Black Male: Repre- 
sentations of Masculinity in Contemporary 
American Art (Whitney Museum/Abrams, 
1994). 

John Kisch and Edward Mapp, A Separate 
Cinema: Fifty Years of Black Cast Posters 
(Noonday, 1992). 

Phyllis Rauch Klotman, ed., Screenplays of 
the African American Experience (Indiana 
UR 1991). 

Michael T Martin, ed., Cinemas of the 
Black Diaspora: Diversity, Dependence, and 
Oppositionality (Wayne State UR 1995). 

Richard M. Merelman, Representing Black 
Culture: Racial Conflict and Cultural Politics 
in the United States (Routledge, 1995). 

Mark A. Reid, Redefining Black Film 
(University of California Press, 1993). 

Valerie Smith, ed., Black Issues in Film and 
Media (Rutgers UR 1996). 

Adam Knee is editorial assistant at The 
Independent. 




"Scriptware is the bestltL 

M. Screenplay 



The pro's choice! 

Professional script writers demand two things: 
They need to get their ideas onto the page 
easily and quickly— anything between your brain- 
storm and the paper kills your creativity. And 
they need their scripts in the proper format— if it 
doesn't look right, your script ends up in some 
secretary's trash can instead of in your produc- 
er's eager hands! 

With Scriptware. your story flies onto the 
page. And the formatting that Hollywood 
expects happens instantly and automatically! All 
you need are your pinkies and the Tab and Enter 
keys to create a perfectly formatted script. It's 
easier than a typewriter! Type character names 
and scene headings with just one keystroke. 
Scriptware does all the margin changes, spacing 
changes, capitalizing and page breaking for you! 
Make changes on page one and Scriptware 
makes sure the rest of your script is still just 
right. You just write-Scriptware keeps your 
script ready to print, submit and sell! 



Scriptware does Windows® 

The best -selling scriptwriting software for 
DOS now brings you the power of Windows! 
Open as many files as you want, use our Speed 
Buttons for lightning fast feature finding, create 
title pages with a click, add electronic Notes, 
shuffle your script (up to 20 scenes at a time!), 
FAX straight to your agent, "cheat" elements so 
your script is just right, rest your eyes with the 
Screen Size changer, print budgetting and sched- 
uling breakdowns. Don't forget the 120.000+ 
word spell check and thesaurus. And the price 
is right! Ask about our competitive upgrade and 
see how to get Scriptware for under $100! 




Scriptware's l<\t\ lei >»» type names, Kent headings, transitions 
mill mure with jiist one keystroke! And with Scriptware, what you 
tee Is what you get! Scriptware <h<m.\ you exactly what your n ript 
will Iwik like when you print it-page breaks, headers, fixiier\, ten- 
don marks, A&B /Htges and more! Pick DOS or Windows, Pm hi 
Lite, and get Ihest ni>t mat's in your head onto the big screen! 



Rave Reviews! 

Scriptware is the software of choice at studios 
and production companies. Just listen to what 
the pros say about Scriptware: 

The official scriptwriting software of 
Universal Studios." 

Geoff Fairbanks 

Mgr., TV-IS, Universal Studios 

Simply the best there is. Just add words." 
Larry Hertzog 

Nowhere Man, SeaQuest 

(i Nothing approaches it in ease of use." 

Peter Coyote 
Writer/Actor 

ii The best tool for scriptwriting, period." 

Fly Bender 
Essential Software for Writers 

The price is right! 

Order today and get Scriptware for a special 
introductory price. Or take our FREE 
demo for a spin. Experience Scriptware and the 
freedom to create for as little as $99.95 with a 
30-day money-back guarantee! 

To order, or for more info. 

CALL TOLL-FREE 800-788-7090! 

Vriplxirr rr.|iwrv lllf. IBM nxnpallMr cixnpuirr • DJI6 omasa betu • 
JMoj lunlilmc ^.^e • MDK K \M IXiS • JSKv RAMWndon • 

NViixVwmn jlnfclcmjrt, ..'. M ^ (Xha mjrl* hebne inCimAaiwo 

«.li». 1750 JO* i 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 41 




by kathryn 
Bowser 

listings do not constitute an endorsement, 
since some details may change after the maga- 
zine goes to press, we recommend that you 
contact the festival directly before sending 
preview cassettes. deadline for submitting a 
call for entries in the festival column is the 
1st of the month two months prior to cover 
date (e.g., may 1 for july issue). all blurbs 
should include: festival dates, categories, 
prizes, entry fees, deadlines, formats & con- 
tact info. to improve our reliability and make 
this column more beneficial, we encourage 
all mediamakers to contact fivf with changes, 
criticism, or praise for festivals profiled. 

Domestic 

BLACK HARVEST INTERNATIONAL FILM 
AND VIDEO FESTIVAL, July, IL. Newly estab. in 
1995, 10-day fest screens film 6k video. Features 
many directors in person for audience discussion. 
Sidebar events. Fest's mission is to bring contempo- 
rary & quality cinema from Black diaspora to 
Chicago area. Recent prods & archival restorations 
accepted; any films that have not previously 
screened in Chicago considered. Ind. African- 
American & African, Caribbean, Canadian & 
British Black films programmed. Sponsored by Film 
Center at School of Art Institute of Chicago as part 
of yr-round exhibition program of int'l cinema. 
Community-based program committee (incl. local 
Black filmmakers, critics & academics) reviews 
entries & makes selections. Entry fee: None. 
Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4", 1/2". Deadline: Late 
May. Contact: Barbara Scharres, Film Center direc- 
tor, Black Harvest Int'l Film & Video Fest, Film 
Center at School of Art Institute of Chicago, 
Columbus Drive & Jackson Blvd., Chicago, IL 
60603; (312) 443-3733; fax: (312) 332-5859; 
bschar@artic.edu. 

CHICAGO UNDERGROUND FILM FESTI- 
VAL, Aug, IL. Now in its 3rd yr, competitive film fest 
was organized to encourage low budget film/video- 
makers as well as provide venue for underground, 
ind. & experimental film/video outside of "entertain- 
ment mainstream," controversial, cutting edge,trans- 
gressive or politically incorrect. Awards given to best 
film or video in cats: best narrative or non-narrative 
short; best doc short; best narrative or non-narrative 
feature; best doc feature. Entries must be made for 



$l,000/min. or less of screen time & be owned by 
maker. George Kuchar is 1996 guest of honor. CUFF 
also features exhibition area for film/videomakers to 
sell products, fundraise or pitch projects; also pre- 
sents special screenings throughout yr. Formats: 
35mm, 16mm, 3/4", S-VHS, VHS, S-8, Beta, Hi-8, 
pixelvision, interactive; preview on 1/2". Entry fee: 
$25 (shorts), $35 (feature). Deadline: Mid May. 
Contact: Jay Bliznick, coordinator/Bryan Wendorf, 
press/public relations, Chicago Underground Film 
Fest, 2501 N. Lincoln Ave. ste 278, Chicago IL 
60614; (312) 866-8660; fax: (312) 489-3468; 
clark@interaccess.com. 

INTERNATIONAL DOCUMENTARY ASSO- 
CIATION (IDA) DOCUMENTARY AWARDS 
COMPETITION, October, CA. This int'l competi- 
tion presents 5 Distinguished Documentary 
Achievement Awards of equal merit to film 6k video 
prods (4 features, 1 short) for outstanding creative 
excellence in doc form. Winners screened at IDA 
DocuFest in late Oct./early Nov. IDA also sponsors 
IDA/David L. Wolper Student Documentary 
Achievement Award Competition (deadline early 
June, entry fee $30) which offers $1,000 cash prize to 
outstanding film or video doc produced at university 
level. Winner & runners-up have opportunity to par- 
ticipate in IDA/David L. Wolper Student Docu- 
mentary Achievement Reel, made available to film 
schools int'lly at cost. Nearly 300 entries sent to the 
competition annually & about 100 to IDA/David L. 
Wolper Student Awards Competition. Entries must 
have been completed w/in previous yr. IDA is a non- 
profit org founded in 1982 to support efforts of non- 
fiction film- & videomakers around world, to pro- 
mote doc form & expand opportunities for prod., dis- 
tribution & exhibition of doc film & video. Formats: 
16mm, 3/4", 1/2". Entry fee: $50 IDA members, $70 
nonmembers. Deadline: Late May. Contact: IDA 
Awards Coordinator, IDA Documentary Awards 
Competition, 1551 South Robertson Blvd., Los 
Angeles, CA 90035; (310) 284-8422; fax: (310) 785- 
9334; idf@netcom.com. 

LONG BEACH INTERNATIONAL GAY AND 
LESBIAN FILM FESTIVAL, June, CA. Several 
thousand moviegoers attend fest, now in 4th yr. Held 
at theater facilities at Cal. State Univ. & Arts 
Theatre & incls premiere film showing & opening 6k 
closing night receptions, w/ many filmmakers attend- 
ing. Formats: 35mm, 16mm. Entry fee: None. 
Deadline: Mid May. Contact: Robert Cano, director, 
Long Beach Int'l Gay 6k Lesbian Film Fest, One in 
Long Beach, 2017 East Fourth Street, Long Beach, 
CA 90814-1001; (310) 434-4455. 

LONG ISLAND FILM AND VIDEO FESTIVAL, 

June, NY. Orig, conceived in 1984 as showcase for 
Long Island filmmakers, fest has become regional 
showcase for ind. prod, features, docs, videos 6k short 
films. Held at Huntington Cinema Arts Centre, 
regional theatre exhibiting ind. films yr-round. 
Competitive fest awards in cats of Best Feature, Best 
Actor/Actress, Best Supporting Actor, Best Art 
Direction/Prod. Design, Best Special F/X/Make-Up, 
Best Screenplay, Grand Jury Prize, Producer of the 
Year, On-Location Award, Best of Fest Award, 
Audience Award, First Feature Award (drama, com- 
edy), Best Experimental Feature, Best Animated 
Film, Best Short Film, Student Film (drama, experi- 



mental, doc, music video), Best Doc (work in 
progress, historical, series), Sales 6k Marketing, 
Student Video. Additional contact: Long Island 
FilmAV Foundation, RO. Box 2157, Saint James, 
NY 17780. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4". Entry fee: 
$50-$75. Deadline: Early May. Contact: Director, 
Long Island Film 6k Video Fest, Suffolk County 
Motion Picture 6k TV Commission, Dennison 
Building, 11th floor, Veterans Memorial Highway, 
Hauppauge, NY 11788; (516) 853-4800. 

MAINE STUDENT FILM AND VIDEO FESTI- 
VAL, June, ME. Founded in 1977, competition is 
open to ME residents 19 6k under. Culminates in 
public screening 6k awards presentation at Portland 
Museum of Art. Cats: Pre -Teen Division, grades K- 
6; Junior Division, grades 7-9; 6k Senior Division, 
grades 10-12. Entries must be 30 min. or shorter. In 
1995, grand prize was scholarship to Int'l Film 6k TV 
Workshops in Rockport ($1,200). Other awards 
incl. videotapes, movie passes, etc. Formats: 16mm, 
3/4", 1/2", super 8, 8mm. Entry fee: None. Deadline: 
Mid May. Contact: Huey, director, Maine Student 
Film 6k Video Fest, Maine Alliance of Media Arts, 
Box 4320, Portland, ME 04101-0520; (207) 773- 
1130. 

MARGARET MEAD FILM FESTIVAL, 

November, NY 20th anniversary of premiere fest in 
US for anthropological 6k ethnographic film 6k 
video. Each yr works programmed on different 
themes: themes for 1996 are works from Pacific 
region; invented doc 6k any nonfiction work looking 
at cultural themes in general in western 6k non- 
western cultures. Only nonfiction works accepted; 
all lengths eligible 6k no restrictions on premiere or 
date of completion. Film- 6k videomakers whose 
works are selected receive certificate of participa- 
tion 6k pass to all fest events; some financial assis- 
tance 6k housing available. Est public audiences for 
programs over 5,000. After NY fest presentation, 
many titles packaged 6k tour to ind. film centers, 
museums 6k universities as part of Margaret Mead 
traveling film/video fest. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 
3/4", 1/2". Entry fee: $75 commercial/TV, $30 ind., 
$15 student. Deadline: May 3. Contact: Elaine 
Charnov, director, Margaret Mead Film Fest, 
American Museum of Natural History, Department 
of Education, Central Park West at 79th St., New 
York, NY 10024; (212) 769-5305; fax: 5329. 

MILL VALLEY FILM FESTIVAL AND VIDE- 
OFEST, October, CA. Invitational, noncompetitive 
fest screens American ind., narrative, doc, animat- 
ed, short (up to 15 min.) 6k experimental 
films/videos in over 40 programs. Fest has become 
premiere West Coast event, w/ commitment to 
bringing new 6k innovative works to Northern CA 
audiences. Filmmakers, distributors, press 6k large 
local audience meet in "an atmosphere where pro- 
fessional relationships thrive." All genres encour- 
aged. Fest incls around 100 programs of ind. fea- 
tures, docs, shorts 6k video works, as well as inter- 
active exhibits, tributes, seminars 6k special events. 
Entries must have been completed w/in the previous 
18 mos; industrial, promotional or instructional 
works not appropriate; premieres 6k new works 
emphasized. Annual audiences estimated at 35,000. 
Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4", 1/2", Beta, multime- 
dia. Entry fee: $25. Deadline: Late May (ear!y)/Late 



42 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



Call Ifor 



Announcing 
the First 



Annual 







Nantucke 
HI Film JC 
Festival 



Honoring 



Screenwriters 
and their Craft 

June 19-23, 1996 

Nantucket Island, 

Massachusetts 

Feature, Short, 

and Documentary films 

will be screened. 

Feature length 

screenplays will 

compete for the 

Best Screenplay award. 



DEADLINE 



Mayl, 1996 

for film and script submissions. 

For more information, 
call:212-642-6339 
fax:212-473-0713 

E-mail:ackfest@aol.com 




407.839.6045 



Features .<* shorts • Narrative • Documentary • animation • experimental* Music Video 



1996 Call For Entries 




LONG ISLAND 
FILM FESTIVAL 

13th Annual Film/Video Festival 

June 7-11, 1996 

Call or Write for Entry Forms (Due 4/15/96): 
Long Island Film Festival 

c/o PO Box 498 

Huntington, NY 11743 

1800 423-7611 

from 10-6, Mon-Fri 

The Long Island Film Festival is co-produced by The Long Island Film & 
TV Foundation and the Cinema Arts Centre in association with the Suffolk 
County Motion Picture and Television Commission. It is sponsored in part 
by the Suffolk County Department of Economic Development. 



Hi<J IT 



FILM SOUND 



• sound design, editing, and SFX 

• Foley, ADR, and voice-over 
recording 



original music and scoring 
library music selection 
and licensing 



• competitive rates 



n , orT mW4Mt 



*4N YC 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 43 



The Independents Guide to 

Taking the Mystery Out of 35mm 



YOU CAN SHOOT 35MM 



Filmmakers Mark Archer 

and Stephen R. Campanetla 

take you on their first 

commercial 35mm film 

shoot along with 

Director of Photography, 

Tony Hettinger and 

Technical Coordinator. 

Johnathan Brouwer. 

Discover how Steve and Mark's 

"JUST SHOOT IT" attitudes helped them with: 

• Project Conception • Shooting in 35mm 

• Script ♦ Working with Labs 

• Storyboarding » Editing 

VHS Video only $39.95 

includes a copy of the original script and 

storyboard. 

(Wease add $5.00 for shipping and handling. Indiana residents 
add 5% sate* tax and Ohio resMtats add 7% sties tax.) 



BMEMEfi - 



To order, send to: 

TYMETOWER Home Video 

810 Coliseum Blvd. East • Suite 107 

Fort Wayne, IN 46805-1234 

Phone:(219)749-9853 
FAX: (219)483-8301 



fi Ims 




212.982.2690 
AX 212.982.2685 



T YOUR HANDS 
ON A SMOKIN 

AVID 



• EXPERIENCED EDITORS. 

•15% DISCOUNT FOR 
INDIE FILMMAKERS!! 

37 FIRST AVE 

SUITE (M2£ 
NEW YORK, NY 10003 




June (final). Contact: MarkFishkin, founder/director, 
Mill Valley Film Fest & Videofest, Mill Creek Plaza, 
38 Miller Avenue, Ste 6, Mill Valley, CA 94941; 
(415) 383-5256; fax: 8606; e-mail: finc@well.com. 

NEW LATINO FILMMAKERS FILM COMPETI- 
TION, June, CA. Fest debuted in 1995, designed to 
showcase up & coming Latino student & ind. film- 
makers; entries should be short narrative or doc films 
by Latinos or on Latino themes. Student films must 
have been produced under the auspices of an educa- 
tional institution & ind. films must not have been 
produced, financed, or initiated by a major studio. 
Entries must have been completed w/in the previous 
two yrs & be under 30 min. 6k in English. Cash prizes 
awarded in narrative and doc cats to top student & 
ind. films. 4 films honored w/ screening at the 
Directors Guild of America Theatre as part of a yrly 
DGA Latino Committee showcasing of current 
Latino films 6k television programs in prod, as well as 
competition winners. The New Latino Filmmakers 
Association "affirms 6k promotes the existence of 
Latino film- 6k videomakers, producers, writers, ani- 
mators 6k film scholars." Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 
super 8, 3/4", 1/2", Beta. Entry fee: $25 ind., $15 stu- 
dent. Deadline: Early May. Contact: director, New 
Latino Filmmakers Film Competition, New Latino 
Filmmakers Association, EO. Box 76647, Los 
Angeles, CA 90076; (818) 584-1623; fax: 0450. 

SINKING CREEK FILM AND VIDEO FESTI- 
VAL, November, TN. Founded in 1969, this is the 
oldest southern film fest w/ focus on ind. media, w/ 
long, nat'l reputation for support 6k encouragement 
of ind. work; many well-known film/video artists have 
premiered here. Ind. 6k student films 6k videos of all 
lengths eligible. $10,000 in cash awards presented. 
Fest incls special presentations by important media- 
makers 6k seminars in film analysis as well as area pre- 
mieres, children's matinees 6k midnight screenings. 
Entries must have been completed w/in the previous 
2 yrs 6k not submitted to previous fests. About 75 
films 6k videos showcased each yr. Audience estimat- 
ed at 3,000. Past special programs have incl African- 
American Issues, Women's Issues, Coming Out on 
Film, Films for the Environment, Animation, Cutting 
Edge of Experimental Film, Children's Matinees, Art 
on Film, Music Videos 6k other cultural issues. Fest 
held on campus of Vanderbilt University in Nashville. 
Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4". Entry fee: $25-$55. 
Deadline: Mid May. Contact: Meryl Truett, executive 
director, Sinking Creek Film 6k Video Fest, 402 
Sarratt Student Center, Vanderbilt University, 
Nashville, TN 37240; (615) 322-4234; fax: (615) 
343-8081. 

UNIVERSITY FILM AND VIDEO ASSOCIA- 
TION STUDENT FILM AND VIDEO FESTI- 
VAL, August, PA. Fest founded in 1993 to "survey 6k 
exhibit the very best in current student film 6k video 
worldwide." Emphasizes independence, creativity 6k 
new approaches to visual media. All entries must 
have been created by students enrolled in a college, 
university or graduate school at time of prod. 6k 
should have been completed no earlier than May of 
previous 2 yrs. Work may have originated in any for- 
mat but must be submitted for preview on VHS. 
Works considered in cats of animation, doc, experi- 
mental 6k narrative. All works prescreened by panel 
of film/videomakers, teachers 6k curators. Finalists 
sent to judges. Over $6,500 in prizes awarded. 



Awards ceremony 6k fest held at annual conference 
of UFVA, which takes place at different location 
each yr. About 35 works showcased each yr. 
National tour of selected fest winners 6k finalists 
begins after fest at venues t.b.a. Past venues have 
incl. American Cinemateque (LA); Rhode Island 
School of Design; Films from the Margin (Boston) ; 
Stanford University; Neighborhood Film/Video 
Project (Philadelphia); Montana State University; 
American University; Jackson Hole Cultural 
Council. UFVA is int'l org dedicated to arts 6k sci- 
ences of film 6k video 6k development of motion 
pictures as medium of communication; publishes 
UFVA Int'l Fest Directory for Students. Formats: 
16mm, 3/4", 1/2", 8mm. Entry fee: $15, $10 UFVA 
members. Deadline: May 31. Contact: Dave Kluft, 
director, University Film 6k Video Association 
Student Film 6k Video Fest, Department of Radio- 
TV-Film, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 
19122; (800) 499-8382/(215) 923-3532; fax: (215) 
204-5280; ufva@vm.temple.edu; WWW: http://- 
thunder.ocis.temple.edu/~ddoyon. 

WORLD POPULATION FILM AND VIDEO 
FESTIVAL, October, MA. Secondary 6k college 
students eligible to submit works that address pop- 
ulation growth, resource consumption, environ- 
ment 6k common global future. Drama, animation, 
image-montage, docs of any length accepted in 
film, video 6k multimedia. Total of $10,000 in prizes 
awarded to top 3 entries in secondary 6k college 
cats. "Best of Fest '96" VHS tapes made available to 
secondary schools 6k colleges 6k may be broadcast 
on MTV, Turner 6k PBS. Preview on VHS. 
Deadline: June 1. Contact: Rawn Fulton, executive 
director, World Population Film/Video Fest, 46 Fox 
Hill Rd., Bernardston, MA 01337; (800) 638-9464; 
fax: (413) 648-9204; empopvidfest@aol.com. 



Foreign 

CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL FILM FES- 
TIVAL, July, United Kingdom. Based at Arts 
Cinema in center of Cambridge, fest annually pre- 
sents 18 day int'l panorama of best of world cinema, 
retros 6k classic revivals. Screenings complemented 
by debates betw audiences 6k filmmakers, industry 
professionals 6k critics. Also features program of 
over 50 British premieres of films from Cannes, 
Berlin, Sundance 6k other int'l fests. Features (fic- 
tion, doc 6k animation) accepted. Over 50 short 
films featured at weekend event (deadline for sub- 
mission of shorts is early May). Formats: 35mm, 
16mm. Entry fee: None. Deadline: Late May. 
Contact: Francois Ballay, director, Cambridge Int'l 
Film Fest, Arts Cinema, 8 Market Passage, 
Cambridge CB2 3PF, UK; tel: Oil 44 1 223 462 
666; fax: Oil 44 1 223 462 555; hieran@cam- 
barts.cityscape.co.uk. 

DRAMBUIE EDINBURGH INTERNATION- 
AL FILM FESTIVAL, August, Scotland. Formerly 
Edinburgh Int'l Film Fest. 50th anniversary this y. 
will be biggest fest yet. "Fest of discovery, celebra- 
tion of cinema, centre of debate, 6k catalyst for new 
directors 6k first films." Began in 1947 as a doc film 
fest 6k is particularly interested in nonfiction; also 
in any film which has not been shown in public 
before. Showcases about 300 new films each yr; 



44 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



shows live action & animated shorts before every 
film in every section. In 1995 initiated Rosebud, 
major section of world premieres of int'l films & 
New British Expo, which attempts to show every 
British feature film made w/in previous yr. All films 
screened to public audiences; also screenings for 
press, delegates & attending guests. Awards go to 
Best New British Film, Best First Feature 6k Best 
Animation. Formats: 70mm, 35mm, 16mm, Beta; 
preview on 1/2". Entry fee: £10-£80, depending on 
budget. Deadline: mid-May. Contact: Mark 
Cousins, director, Drambuie Edinburgh Int'l Film 
Fest, Filmhouse, 88 Lothian Road, Edinburgh, EH3 
9BZ, Scotland, United Kingdom; tel: Oil 44 31 228 
4051; fax: Oil 44 31 229 5501. 

HUNGARIAN MULTICULTURAL CENTER 
FILM AND VIDEO FESTIVAL, Sept. 20-22, 
Hungary. Fest accepts film, video &. animated 
works. Entry fee: $35. Deadline: Apr. 12. Contact: 
Beata Szechy, Hungarian Multicultural Center, 
Inc., 8850 Ferguson Rd., #1114, Dallas, TX 75228; 
tel/fax: (214) 319-3292. 

JERUSALEM FILM FESTIVAL, June, Israel. 
Founded in 1984, noncompetitive int'l fest shows 
features, shorts, docs, TV 6k video programs, ani- 
mation, restored classics 6k films of Jewish interest. 
Israeli film competition (awarding Wolgin Dove 
Award of $25,000 for best feature, $10,000 for best 
doc 6k $5,000 for best short) judged by int'l jury. 
Also Spirit of Freedom Award ($3,000) for film 
dealing w/ human rights 6k Lipper Award for Israeli 
screenwriters. Addt'l sections incl. retros, tributes 
6k special programs. Entries must not have been 
previously screened in Israel. Program incls over 
150 films from 40 countries. Formats: 35mm, 
16mm. Entry fee: None. Deadline: Late May. 
Contact: Lia Van Leer, director, Jerusalem Film 
Fest, RO. Box 8561, Jerusalem 91083, Israel; tel: 
011 972 2 724 131; fax: 011 972 2 733 076. 

KARLOVY VARY INTERNATIONAL FILM 
FESTIVAL, June, Czech Republic. Formerly bien- 
nial event, FIAPF-recognized competitive fest, 
founded in 1946, became ann'l event in 1994 6k is 
now in 31st yr. Held at one of world's oldest 6k most 
famous spas, fest is one of largest film events in cen- 
tral Europe. Film competition for 35mm full length 
feature films is accompanied by several noncompet- 
itive sections. Entries in competition must have 
been completed since Jan 1 of preceding yr 6k not 
presented in competition of any other int'l fest. 
Awards: Grand Prix of Crystal Globe, Special 
Award of Jury, Best Director Prize, Best 
Actor/Actress 6k prize awarded tor life-long work. 
Formats: 55mm, 16mm. Entry fee: None. Deadline: 
Late May. Contact: Jiri Bartosua, foundation presi- 
dent, Karlovy Vary International Film Fest 
(Mezinarodniho Filmoveho Festivalu V Karlovych 
Varech), Film-Fest Karlovy Vary Foundation, 
Valdstejnske nam. 4, 11811 Prague I, Czech 
Republic; tel: 011 42 2 5152475; tax: 011 42 2 
5 50542. 

LOCARNO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTI- 
VAL, August, Switzerland. Founded in 1949, this 
majoi Swiss cultural cinematic all-feature event is 
known as "the smallest of the big fests 6< the biggest 
oi the small,' 1 W reputation lor innovative pro- 
gramming 6*. support of alternative visions from 



AVID. AVID. AVID. AVID. 




LUNA 

PICTURES 



LOW RATES // FABULOUS ROOMS 

ON-LINE // OFF-LINE 

NEW CUSTOMER DISCOUNT 



34 W 17th Street 

212 477 4493 



sl AVID. AVID. AVID. AVID. 



Call For Entries 



Hi-8/Betacam Sp 

Packages 

SONY, BETACAM SP CAMCORDER 
PACKAGE... $400 

SONY, PRO HI BAND 
PACKAGE... $200 

INCLUDED IN EACH PACKAGE: 

■ Light Kit plus Sun Gun w/Battery Belt 

■ Audio Kit plus Shore Field Mixer FP32 

■ Field monitor ■ Fluid tripod 

■ 

VHS-VHS PROFESSIONAL 
EDITING SYSTEM 

DO YOUR HI-8 AND BETACAM SP 
OFF LINE EDITING ON: 

JVC BR8600U to JVC BR8600U 
W/RM86U editing console... $10 per/hr. 

PEOPLE W/AIDS PROJECTS DISC00NT 



Manahatta Images Corp. 

260 WEST 10TH STREET, STE. IE 

NEW YORK. NEW YORK 10014 

212-807-8825 FAX AVAILABLE 




27th 
Sinking Creek 



Film/Video 
Fesitval 

35mm, 16mm Film 
& 3/4" Umatic Video 

All genre: documentary, 
animation, dramatic, ex- 
perimental, mixed genre, 
and music video. 



DEADLINE MAY 31, 1996 



Festival: featuring seminars, 

special presentations and 

open screenings. 

NOV 19 - 24, 1996 
NASHVILLE, TN 

$10,000 in Awards 

Canadian and International 
entries accepted. 

For Entry Forms and 
Registration Procedures: 

Sinking Creek Film/Video Festival 

Meryl Truett, Executive Director 

402 Sarratt Student Center 

Vanderbilt University 

Nashville, TN 37240 

Ph. 615.322.2471 or 322.4234 

Fax: 615.343.8081 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 45 




HIGH Ri 

Graphics & AnimMfon 
for Feature Films, T^ k Print 

^ HIGH SPEED 

^JO Rendering 



'J J : 






P 3/4 SP 



MIDI-SMPTE STUDIO 



rAL MULTITI 

w ith composer 



f rffiTfl jffiTri 

if ■ 



212 - 695-7255 



NEW YORK 

INTERNATIONAL 

INDEPENDENT 

FILM & VIDEO 

FESTIVAL 



Producers, Managers, Agents, 

Distributors, and Financiers are invited, 

plus Press, Critics, 

and of course, NYC audiences. 



CALL 212.777.7100 

M - F 2pm - 6|)m 

Eastern Standard Time 

for applications 



Features, Shorts, Animation, 

Documentaries, 35, 16, Video, 

Multi - Media 



23rd 
Athens 

International 

Film& 

Video 
Festival 



Athens 

Intensive 

Media 

Workshops 



April 26 - 
May 3,1996 



Deadline for 

Entries: 

January 12, 1996 



telephone: 

614-593-1330 
fax: 

614-593-1328 
e-mail: 

rbradiey@ohiou.edu 
write: 

Athens Center 
for Film & Video 
P.O. Box 388 
Athens, OH 
45701 



ind. directors & recently founded national film 
industries. Unique section is series of open-air 
screenings in Locarno's Piazza Grande, which holds 
8,000. Program, in addition to competition & 
Piazza Grande screenings, incls retro section, side- 
bar sections, new Swiss cinema & film market. 
Competition accepts fiction features by new direc- 
tors, art films, low budget films, work from Third 
World countries, inds & cinema d'auteur. New sec- 
tion is Leopards of Tomorrow, short films 6k works 
from film schools around world. Entries must have 
been completed w/in previous yr. Films which have 
won prizes at other int'l fests recognized by the 
FIAPF ineligible for competition & preferences for 
all sections will be given to world or European pre- 
mieres. Educational, advertising & scientific films 
ineligible. Awards: Grand Prix of Fest (Golden 
Leopard) together w/ the Grand Prix of the City of 
Locarno (Sfr 30,000) to the best film in competi- 
tion; the City of Locarno (Sfr 15,000); 3rd Prize 
(Bronze Leopard) together w/ the 3rd Prize of the 
City of Locarno (Sfr 10,000), 4th Prize (Bronze 
Leopard) 6k Special Prize (Bronze Leopard), to an 
actor or actress of exceptional merit in film in com- 
petition; Special Jury Award (Sfr 10,000). 2 reps of 
each film selected for competition will be fest 
guests for 5 days. Over 250 prods shown each yr. 
Covered by about 750 journalists from 30 coun- 
tries. Formats: 35mm, 16mm. Entry fee: None. 
Deadline: Late May. Contact: Marco Muller, direc- 
tor, Locarno International Film Fest (Fest 
Internazionale del Film di Locarno) , Via della Posta 
6, EO. Box 1621, CH-6600 Locarno, Switzerland; 
tel: 011 41 93 31 02 32; fax: 011 41 93 31 74 65. 

LOCARNO VIDEOART/INTERNATIONAL 
VIDEO & ELECTRONIC ART FESTIVAL, 

August, Switzerland. Founded in 1980, competi- 
tive, annual fest programs all video along w/ instal- 
lations, multimedia shows, colloquia 6k observato- 
ry. Described as place "where artists, critics 6k 
philosophers meet to have a. point to discuss the 
state of the evolution between arts 6k technolo- 
gies." Competition accepts works prod, after June 
of preceding yr 6k unawarded in other fests. 
Competition criteria incl any work that falls under 
the heading "video art" where "artistic research 6k 
creativity overshadow both the technical means 
employed 6k the reference category chosen by the 
artist." Awards: Grand Prix del la Ville de Locarno 
(25,000Sfr; cash prize divided between Art Video: 
10,000Sfr, 6k Installations: 15,000Sfr), UNESCO 
Award (2 grants to honor new talent), Conseille de 
Europe, 3 Laser d'Or Awards (to artists, theorists 
6k/or institutions), Artronic, TV Picture, World 
Graph, Prix Lagomaggiore. About 60 prods show- 
cased annually. Formats: 3/4," 1/2". Entry fee: 
None. Deadline: Late May. Contact: Lorenzo 
Bianda, president, AVART Locarno VideoArt/Int'l 
Video 6k Electronic Art Fest (Video Art Fest et 
Forum International des Nouvelles Images), 
Videoart, RO. Box 146, CH-6604, Locarno, 
Switzerland; tel: 011 41 93 31 22 08; fax: 011 41 93 
31 22 08. 

MOSCOW INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTI- 
VAL, July, Russia. Founded in 1959, fest incls com- 
petition of not more than 18 feature length films 
presenting wide range of modern world film prod.; 
out of competition screenings (Panorama) ; retros 



46 THE INDEPENDENT April 1 996 



& tributes. Organized by Moscow government, 
Russian State Committee for the Cinema & Union 
of Filmmakers of Russia. In 1995, fest received a $12 
million grant from the Russian government to 
revamp event, w/ $3 million to be spent refurbishing 
local cinemas. Only feature films completed after Jan 
1 of preceding yr & unscreened in competitive sec- 
tion of other int'l fests eligible for competition. 
Awards: Main Prize ($50,000 & sculpture of St. 
George, symbol of the City of Moscow); Special Jury 
Prize ($20,000); Best Director ($20,000); Best Actor 
($20,000); Best Actress ($20,000); each film shown 
at fest receives Diploma of Participation. Bolshoi 
Theater is site of fest's opening & closing cere- 
monies; outdoor celebrations held in Red Square & 
Moscow parks. Fest also sponsors film market 6k now 
has modern press center. New motto is Beauty Saves 
the World (from Dostoyevsky). Formats: 70mm, 
35mm. Entry fee: None. Deadline: Mid May. 
Contact: Alexandre Alanesyan, general director, 
Moscow International Film Fest, Interfest, 
Khokhlovsky Per., 10/1, Moscow 109028, Russia; tel: 
011 95 917 2486; fax: 011 95 916 0107. 

MYSTFEST INTERNATIONAL MYSTERY 
FILM FESTIVAL, June, Italy. Founded in 1979, 
MystFest is competitive int'l fest of mystery, crime 6k 
detective films, recognized by FIAPF, associated w/ 
Federfestival A.G.I.S, promoted by municipal 
authorities of Cattolica & organized by its Centro 
Culturale Polivalente. Program incls competition for 
feature films, information section, video section, ret- 
ros, seminars & debates. All entries must be previ- 
ously unreleased in Italy & unawarded in other int'l 



competitive events. Fest has inaugurated a $10,000 
prize to director of the best 1st or 2nd feature film. 
Formats: 35mm, 16mm. Entry fee: None. Deadline: 
Late May. Contact: (Dott.) Marcello Di Bella, diret- 
tore servizi culturali, MystFest International Mystery 
Film Fest (Fest Internazional del Giallo e del 
Mistero), Centro Culturale Polivalente, Piazza della 
Repubblica, 31, 47033 Cattolica, Italy; tel: 011 39 
541 967 802; fax: 011 39 541 967 803. 

PRAGUE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, 

June, Czech Republic. In 2nd yr, this FIAPF-sanc- 
tioned competitive fest is now among top accredited 
fests. Over 100 films will be showcased over 9 days. 
Int'l Competition & noncompetitive Panorama of 
World Cinema are open to films of all countries. 
Entries for Int'l Competition must be feature-length, 
not doc. 6k not previously screened at any other int'l 
competition whatsoever. Awards, known as Golden 
Golems, are: Grand Prize for best film, Best Director, 
Best Actor, Best Actress & Jury Prize. Entries for 
Panorama selection must be features produced in last 
yr or 2, any subject & style ("we favor live-action fic- 
tion, but a great animated film or doc. can be incl."). 
Other fest sections: National Cinema, focusing on 
different country each yr (this yr on Polish cinema), 
Czech cinema of last yr & 1 or 2 other retrospectives. 
Entry fee: None. Formats: 35mm. Must send VHS 
tape (1/2", 3/4"; PAL or NTSC) w/ entry form. 
Deadline: April 5. US contact for entry & more info: 
Stephanie Beroos (212) 749-4394. Or contact Prague 
Int'l Film Fest, c/o Bohemia Promotion a.s., V Haji 
15, 170 00 Praha 7, Czech Republic; tel: 001 42 2 
66795421 3 or 001 42 2 66795401; fax: 001 42 2 



66795405 or 001 42 2 66795400. 

QUEBEC INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE FILM 
FESTIVAL, October, Canada. Founded in 1990, fest 
is one of largest int'l scientific film events, selecting 
about 70 films for its int'l program 6k 23 for competi- 
tion. Strongly connected to network of scientific film 
fests throughout the world 6k offers producers/direc- 
tors opportunity to make their work known to orga- 
nizers of other fests 6k foreign specialists attending. 
Competition offers awards in 10 cats: film for young 
people; science/nature (wildlife resources); environ- 
ment; film of scientific research; Quebec film or 
video; scientific popularization; francophone film; 
excellence in film or TV; scientific excellence 6k 
Nortel Grand Prize. Fest also offers public screenings 
in Quebec City 6k Montreal, special evenings w/ int'- 
ly acclaimed lecturers, programming for young people 
6k fest on tour 6k video library of science films. Entries 
must have been completed after Jan 1 of the preced- 
ing 2 yrs. Formats: 16mm, 3/4," Beta. Entry fee: $100 
Can. Deadline: Mid May. Contact: Herve Fischer, 
executive director, Quebec International Science 
Film Fest (Fest International du Film Scientifique du 
Quebec), 15, de la Commune Ouest, Montreal, 
Quebec, Canada H2Y 2C6; tel: (514) 849-1612; fax: 
(514)982-0064. 

SAO PAOLO INTERNATIONAL SHORT FILM 
FESTIVAL, August, Brazil. Founded in 1990, non- 
competitive fest quickly established itself as impor- 
tant part of the int'l shorts fest scene. Aims to exhib- 
it short films produced in Brazil, present Latin 
America's unknown prods, allow for greater access to 
best int'l short films of past 6k present 6k continue to 



sw 



tier 



■4 



the 



1996 TAOS TALKING PICTURE FESTIVAL 

An International Rendezvous celebrating the moving image and exploring 

the power of the media. 

Tributes, retrospectives and the very best in new 
independent films. Panel discussions and Workshops. 



'.Talking 

1 vl* • 



18-51 



estiva! 



21 6M North Pueblo Rd. #216 Taos, NM 87571 

T 505.751.0637 F 505.751.7385 

email: taosfilm@laplaza.taos.nm.us 



^•NiW MEXKD 



Synch ronicity 
Sound 

Digital Audio Workstation with 
Video & Film Lock up 

Full Sound Track Preparation & 
Editing 

Dialogue, Effects, Music Editing 
& Sound Design 

Digital Production Recording 

Multi-Format Mixing Facility 

Interformat Sound Transfers 

Overnite T.C. Stripes & Window Dubs 

AIVF Member & Student Discount 

611 Broadway, Cable Bldg., Suite 907 H 
New York, NY 10012 

(212) 254-6694 
Fax: (212) 254-5086 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 47 



1 I I I I I I I i I I I I I I I - 

AFFORDABLE VIDEO SOLUTIONS] 



THIRD 

WAVE 

MEDIA 

INC 



SONY BETA SP A /B EDITING. TRANSFERS. BUMP 
UPS. WINDOW DUBS. CMX ON LINE MASTERING. 
DYNAMIC MOTION CONTROL. DAT. TOASTER 
FX/CG/3D . NEWTEK VIDEO FLYER NON LINEAR 
EDITING. GREAT LOW RATES! 



IKE / SONY BETACAM SP PACKAGE : $275 . 3 CHIP 
HI-8 SONY VX3 : $75. 3 CHIP S-VHS BR-S4IIU : 
$175 EXPERIENCED EDITOR AVAILABLE . CALL NOW 
FOR DISCOUNT EDITING PRICES : 212-751-7414 



SWEET 
EAST 60'S 
LOCATION 




D.R. REIFF 
& ASSOCIATES 



ENTERTAINMENT INSURANCE 

BROKERS 

320 WEST 57 ST 

NEW YORK, NY 10019 

(212)603-0231 FAX (212) 247-0739 



Revolutionary pjl M 




SCHOOL 

wiihDovSSSimens 



LOS ANGELES 

May 11-12 or Jun 22-23 



If you haven't 
Produced , Directed 
or Distributed an 
independent feature 
film... 

...You haven't taken 
the 1-Day Urn 
School™. 

NEW YORK 
Jul 20-21 



CHICAGO Apr20-21; ATLANTA: Apr 27-28;TEXAS: May 

4-5; FT. LAUDERDALE May 18-19; WASfflNGTON,DC 

May 25-26; PHILDELPHIA: Jun 1-2; BOSTON: Jun 29-30; 

LONDON: Jul 6-7; AMSTERDAM Jul 13-14 

ENROLL! GRADUATE! 



Can't Attend? Can't Wait? 
Audio Film School™ Available 



either only 

$289 



CYBERSPACE FILM SCHOOL™ 
http^/hollywoodu.com 



HOU-VWOO p 



HFI, PO Box 481 252, LA, CA 90048 



800-366-3456 




Complete Production Office Facilities 



• Features 


• Phones 


• Music Videos 


• Fax 


» Documentaries 


• Copier 


• Shorts 


• Computer 


24 Hour Access/Convenient Location 


Flexible Pricing Packages 


CALL 212-777-7060 




High Voltage Productions 
648 Broadway, New York, New York 10012 



"exhibit films that may contribute to the develop- 
ment of the short film concerning its language, spe- 
cific shape & way of production." Organized by 
Associacao. Cultural Kinoforum. Entries must be 
no more than 35 min.; all genres accepted. Very 
enthusiastic local audience fills screenings & 
debates all types of films. Past programs have incl. 
extensive panoramas of American ind. short films as 
well as tributes, exhibits &. special screenings. 
Formats: 35mm, 16mm. Entry fee: None. Deadline: 
Late May. Contact: Zita Carvalhosa, director, Sao 
Paolo International Short Film Fest (Fest 
Internacional de Curtas-Metragens de Sao Paolo), 
Associacao. Cultural Kinoforum, Rua Cristiano 
Viana 907 0541 1.001, Sao Paolo - SP, Brazil; tel: Oil 
55 11 852 9601; fax: 011 55 11 852 9601; saoshort- 
fest@ax.ibase.org.br; WWW: http://www. puc- 
rio.br/mis 

TAM-TAM VIDEO, TV AND THIRD WORLD 
COMPETITION, November, Italy. Founded in 
1987 &. int'l competition for media produced in 
South (Latin American, Africa, Asia) of world & 
materials produced in North about South. Cats incl. 
fiction, doc, animation & videoclip; top awards in 
each cat are $1,500. Entries must be under 60 min. 
Fest provides accommodations & meals for media- 
makers selected. Formats: Betacam SP; preview on 
VHS. Entry fee: None. Deadline: Mid May. 
Contact: Massimo Del Carpio, director, Tam-Tam 
Video, TV &. Third World Competition (Gior- 
nalismo Televisivo e Terzo Mondo) CIES, Via 
Palermo, 36, 00184 Rome, Italy; tel: 011 39 6 482 
0464; fax: 011 39 6 486419; c.ies@agora.stm.it. 

VELDEN AMATEUR FILM FESTIVAL OF 

NATIONS, June, Austria. Held in Ebensee am 
Traunsee in center of Austria, fest invites non-com- 
mercial films & videos. No restriction on topics. 
Entries must have been completed in preceding 2 
yrs & be under 30 min. Jury picks entries; however, 
any filmmaker present at fest has right to enter 
his/her prod, in competition. Makers may also par- 
ticipate in jury deliberations on their prods. Awards: 
Gold & Silver Ebenseer Bear; Austrian Science & 
Art Minister Prize (AS 10,000); special award for 
best film of the competition (winner receives invi- 
tation for free participation in next edition); special 
award for Best Experimental Film; UNICA- 
Medaille; cups & certificates. Formats: 35mm, 
16mm, 1/2," super 8, 8mm. Entry fee: None. 
Deadline: Early May. Contact: Erich Reiss, director, 
Velden Amateur Film Fest of Nations (Filmfestival 
der Nationen), Europaisches Videoarchiv, Gaum- 
bergstrasse 82, A-4060 Linz, Austria; tel: 011 43 
732 67 36 93; fax: 011 43 732 67 36 93. 



ERRATA 

THE YAMAGATA INTERNATIONAL 
DOCUMENTARY FILM FESTIVAL, 

October, Japan. The Jan./Feb. '96 issue of 

The Indeperident mistakenly listed this fest 

as occurring in Oct. 1996. Yamagata is a 

biennial fest & the next edition will be 

held in Oct. 1997. We regret the error. 



48 THE INDEPENDENT April 1 996 



THE ASSOCIATION OF 
INDEPENDENT 



VIDEO & FILMMAKERS 




iverse, committed, 
opinionated, and 
fiercely indepen- 
dent — these are the 
video and filmmak- 
ers who are mem- 
bers of AIVF. 
Documentary and 
feature filmmakers, animators, experi- 
mentalists, distributors, educators, 
students, curators — all concerned 
that their work make a difference — 
find the Association of Independent 
Video and Filmmakers, the national 
service organization for independent 
producers, vital to their professional 
lives. Whether it's our magazine, The 
Independent Film & Video Monthly, or 
the organization raising its collective 
voice to advocate for important 
issues, AIVF preserves your indepen- 
dence while letting you know you're 
not alone. 

AIVF helps you save time and money 
as well. You'll find you can spend 
more of your time (and less of your 
money) on what you do best — getting 
your work made and seen. To succeed 
as an independent today, you need a 
wealth of resources, strong connec- 
tions, and the best information avail- 
able. So join with more than 5,000 
other independents who rely on AIVF 
to help them succeed. 

JOIN AIVF TODAY! 

Here's what membership offers: 

THE INDEPENDENT FILM & 
VIDEO MONTHLY 

Membership provides you with a 
year's subscription to The hvieperident. 
Thought-provoking features, news, 



and regular columns on business, 
technical, and legal matters. Plus fes- 
tival listings, funding deadlines, exhi- 
bition venues, and announcements of 
member activities and new programs 
and services. Special issues highlight 
regional activity and focus on subjects 
including media education and the 
new technologies. 

INSURANCE 

Members are eligible to purchase dis- 
counted personal and production 
insurance plans through AIVF suppli- 
ers. A wide range of health insurance 
options are available, as well as special 
liability, E&O, and production plans 
tailored for the needs of low-budget 
mediamakers. 

TRADE DISCOUNTS 

A growing list of businesses across the 
country offer AIVF members dis- 
counts on equipment and auto 
rentals, film processing, transfers, 
editing, and other production necessi- 
ties. Plus long-distance and overnight 
courier services are available at spe- 
cial rates for AIVF members from 
national companies. In New York, 
members receive discounted rates at 
two hotels to make attendance at our 
programs and other important events 
more convenient. 

CONFERENCE/SCREENING 
ROOM 

AIVF's new office has a low-cost 
facility for members to hold meetings 
and small private screenings of work 
for friends, distributors, programmers, 
hinders, and producers. 



INFORMATION 

We distribute a series of publications 
on financing, funding, distribution, 
and production; members receive dis- 
counts on selected titles. AIVF's staff 
also can provide information about 
distributors, festivals, and general 
information pertinent to your needs. 
Our library houses information on 
everything from distributors to sample 
contracts to budgets. 

WORKSHOPS, PANELS, AND 
SEMINARS 

Members get discounts on events cov- 
ering the whole spectrum of current 
issues and concerns affecting the 
field, ranging from business and aes- 
thetic to technical and political top- 
ics. Plus: members-only evenings with 
festival directors, producers, distribu- 
tors, cable programmers, and funders. 

ADVOCACY 

Members receive periodic advocacy 
alerts, with updates on important leg- 
islative issues affecting the indepen- 
dent field and mobilization for collec- 
tive action. 

COMMUNITY 

AIVF sponsors monthly member get- 
togethers in cities across the country; 
call the office for the one nearest you. 
Plus members are carrying on active 
dialogue online — creating a "virtual 
community" for independents to 
share information, resources, and 
ideas. Another way to reach fellow 
independents to let them know about 
your screenings, business services, and 
other announcements is by renting 
our mailing list, available at a dis- 
count to members. 



MEMBERSHIP CATEGORIES 

Individual/Student Membership 

Year's subscription to The Independent • Access to all plans and discounts • Festival/ 
Distribution/Library services • Information Services • Discounted admission to seminars • 
Book discounts • Advocacy action alerts • Eligibility to vote and run for board of directors 

Supporting Membership 

All the above for two individuals at one address, with 1 subscription to The Independent 

Non-profit Organizational/Business & Industry Membership 

All the above benefits, except access to health insurance plans • 2 copies of The Independent 
• 1 free FIVF-published book per year • Complimentary bulk shipments of The Independent 
to conferences, festivals, and other special events • Special mention in The Independent • 
Representative may vote and run for board of directors 



Library Subscription 

Year's subscription to The Independent only 



JOIN AIVF TODAY 



Membership Rates o" 

Q $25/student (enclose copy of student ID) 

□ $44 $40/individual (special rate thru 4/30/96) 

□ $75/supporting 

Q $75/library subscription 

Q $100/non-profit organization 

Q $150/business & industry 

□ Magazines are mailed Second-class; add $20 for 
First class mailing 



Name(s) 



Organization 

Address 

City 

State 



ZIP 



Country 

Weekday tel. 
Fax 



Acct # 



Foreign Mailing Rates 

Q Surface mail 

(incl. Canada & Mexico) - Add $10 
□ Air mail 

— Canada, Mexico, Western Hemisphere- 
Add $20 

—Europe - Add $40 

— Asia, Pacific Rim, Africa - Add $50 

Membership cost 

Mailing costs (if applicable) 

Contribution tO FIVF (make separate tax-deductible check payable to FIVF) 

Total amount enclosed (check or money order ) 
Or please bill my □ Visa □ MC 



Exp. date I II I 



Signature_ 



AIVF, 304 Hudson St., 6th fl., NY, NY 10013; (212) 8074400; fax (212) 463-8519 



£%££ 



m 



m 



XWK 



i i*r. 



IvW 



WL 



fffl 

r.' itHcWU 



mZZtiffl 






classified ads of up to 240 characters 
(including spaces & punctuation) cost 
$25/issue for aivf members, $35 for nonmem- 
bers; classified ads of 240-480 characters 
cost $45/issue for aivf members, $65 for non- 
members, include member id# with ad. ads 
exceeding requested length will be edited, 
all copy should be typed double-spaced and 
must be accompanied by a check or money 
order payable to: fivf, 304 hudson st., new 
york, ny 10013. to pay by credit card, you must 
include: credit card type (visa/mc); card 
number; name on card; expiration date; 
billing address & cardholder's daytime 
phone. ads received without all information 
will be discarded. advertisers wishing to 
run a classified more than once must pay for 
each insertion and indicate number of inser- 
tions on submitted copy. deadlines are 1st of 
each month, two months prior to cover date 
(e.g. may 1st for july issue). 

Buy • Rent • Sell 

9 GIG AVID HARD DRIVES DIRT CHEAP. 

For rent as low as $175/week. (212) 406-0180. 

BETACAM SP CAMERA PACKAGE for rent. 
BVW 507 camera, audio 6k lights, $400 per day. 
Top-notch crews available. (212) 620-0933. 

FILM T-SHIRT & WALL CLOCK Original design 
shirt w/ "Film is Reel." A must for your wardrobe. 
Also film reel analog wall clock. Tell time in your 
style. For brochure, send SASE to Film Shirt/ Reel 
Clock, Box 525, Sarasota, FL 34230-0525. 

FOR RENT: Betacam quality on Hi8. New 700 
line-, resolution Sony DXC327A broadcast pkg, 
incl. tripod, monitor lights, mikes, batteries, ac. 
$220/day, multi-day disc. Beta SP also available 6k 
cechies too. Call (212) 242-3009. 

FOR RENT: Hi8 Sony 3-chip VX-3 camcorders, 
$75/day or $300/wk; plus mikes, lighting gear, 
stands, etc. negotiable. Call White St. TV Studio 
(212) 274-0036. 

FOR SALE OR LEASE: Anamorphic lens in top 
condition for use with 16mm film camera. Please 
contact Heidi Levine (215) 487-1776. 

FOR SALE: Canon L-2 Hi8 camera package w/ 2 
interchangeable lenses (5- 15mm ex 8- 120mm), 2 5- 
hr batteries, sungun, filters, mikes, hard case, loads 
of extras. Mint condition. 3 year warranty. $3,000. 
Call Robert (212)608-5013. 

FOR SALE: Sony 3-chip Hi8 camera VX3 pack- 
age. Includes Sony color monitor #XO M30 w/ 
camera mount bracket, 4 Sony camera batteries, 
Bescoi bell battery. $3,000. Call (212) 957-2720. 

FOR SALE: Sony 3 4" offline system. Sony VO- 
5850, VO-5800, RM-440 controller, 2 Panasonic 
13" (BT-1300N) color monitors. Hxcellcnt condi- 
tion, privately owned, $6,500. Tom (212) 929- 
2439. 

FOR SALE: Sony EVW-300 H.S camera. Canon 
1 3:1 lens, NRG Power Station II, NRG Power Max, 
Sennheisei K2 mic s\su-m, \|| l ibles. All compo- 



nents approx. 12 hrs of use, original boxes. $5,900. 
(541) 756-2087. 

FOR SALE: Sony SVD-1000 Hi8 deck, $900. Mint 
condition, used less than 20 hrs. Visca protocol. Call 
George (212) 246-4864- 

GREAT EDITING SYSTEM FOR SALE: Sony 
EVO-9700. Hi8 dual decks w/ titler. Excellent condi- 
tion, privately owned. $2,500. Call (718) 232-7572. 

HI8 CANON L2 BODY for sale. Used for only 2 
weeks, still under warranty. Perfect condition. Uses 
interchangeable lenses. Broadcast quality video. 
$1,800. Dick Roberts (203) 637-0445. 

SET OF LOWEL LAMPS: 2 1000 watt DPs, 4 500 
watt omnis w/ half 6k full scrims, barn doors, stands, 
converters, elbow 6k other accessories, carrying case 
6k tube. Anally perfect condition. Value approx. 
$1,700. Make me an offer. (212) 353-3886. 

WORKSHOPS 6k PROD. PKGS IN MEXICO: 

Video 6k film hands-on workshops, summer '96, in 
English. Renting Beta SP, Arri, Krasnogorsk 6k post. If 
you need or sell equipment contact us. Fax (01 1 525) 
575-1949 or call Pedro Araneda (NYU grad) (525) 
416-2683. 

Distribution 

ABCs OF LIBRARY DISTRIBUTION: Discover 
the keys to unlocking this lucrative market. 
Comprehensive report offers sure cure for the 
"Distribution Blues." Satisfaction guaranteed. $15.95 
(TX +6.25% sales tax). MC/Visa/check. Call (800) 
697-2391. 

AQUARIUS PRODUCTIONS, INC., leading intT 
distributor of videos on health care, seeks new videos 
on abuse, violence, addiction 6k special ed as well as 
aging 6k disabilities. Call/send videos for preview. 
Leslie Kussman, Aquarius, 5 Powderhouse Ln., 
Sherborn, MA 01770; (508) 651-2963. 

ATA TRADING CORP., actively 6k successfully 
distributing ind. prods, for over 50 yrs, seeks new pro- 
gramming of all types for worldwide distribution into 
all markets. Contact us at (212) 594-6460. 

CS ASSOCIATES seeks documentaries for foreign 
6k domestic distribution. We also secure co-prod, 
funds for unfinished projects. Our catalog includes: 
The Civil War, FRONTLINE, Children of Fate 6k The 
Day After Trinity. Call (415) 383-6060. 

DISTRIBUTOR ACCEPTING FILM/VIDEO 
WORK. Any medium. All genres. Send VHS copy 
6k/or query to: Mono Productions, PO Box 147, East 
Greenville, PA 18041. Send SASE for our catalog. 

FANLIGHT PRODUCTIONS, distributor of 

award-winning film 6k video on disabilities, health 
care, mental health, family/social issues, etc. seeks 
new work for distribution to educational markets. 
Karen McMillcn, Fanlight Productions, 47 Halifax 
St., Boston, MA 021 30; (800) 937-41 1 3. 

FILMO COMMUNICATIONS PRIVATE LTD. 
Singapore media distrib, co., seeking programs for 

nontheatrical, educ 6k public library markets for 1 V, 
cable 6s. video-on-demand. Stephen K. H. Say, man- 
aging dir., I ilnn > Communications Pvt Ltd. Block 
165, Bukit Merah Central #07-3677, Singapore 




^l^j^^^F^ 



150165, Rep. of Singapore; fax: 011 65 278-1009. 

REAL LIFE ENTERTAINMENT seeks docs for 
domestic 6k international distribution, as well as 
unfinished projects for coproduction. VHS 6k propos- 
als to: Attn: Gina Kwon, 1901 Avenue of the Stars, 
18th fl., Los Angeles, CA 90067; (310) 553-1726. 

SEEKING EDUCATIONAL VIDEOS on guidance 
issues such as violence, drug prevention 6k parenting 
for exclusive distribution. Out aggressive marketing 
produces unequaled results. Bureau for At-Risk 
Youth, 645 New York Ave., Huntington, NY 11743; 
(800) 99-YOUTH. 

Freelancers 

16MM/35MM PROD. PKG. w/ cinematographer. 
Complete pkg includes 16mm or Arri 35BL w/ video 
assist, Nagra 6k sound kit, Mole/Lowel lights, dolly, jib 
crane, grip equip. Credits in features, shorts, docs, 
music videos. Call Tom (201) 807-0155. 

A-l DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY. Well 
established. Top notch reel, experienced. Clients 
incl. TBS, Hunts, Oscar Mayer, MCI 6k AT6kT. Arri 
SR, Sony Beta SP HMI lighting. I'm fast, efficient 6k 
create beautiful images. Call Bret (203) 254-7370. 

AATON 16MM PRODUCTION PACKAGE. 

Polish DP Docs, features. Call Tomasz (212) 721- 
9819 or Jerry (212) 594-5260. 

AVID EDITOR w/ varied credits available for long 
or short projects at negotiable rates. (212) 465-3153. 

BETA SP cameraman w/ Sony 3-chip BVP-70/BVV- 
5SP, avail, for your project. Equip, pkg, DP kit, 
Sennheiser mics, 5-passenger van. Audio engineer 
avail. 3/4" offline editing system. Thomas (212) 929- 
2439; (201) 667-9894. 

CAMERAMAN: Aaton 16mm or Beta SP prod, pkg 
includes lighting, audio 6k car. Awards 6m experience 
in music video, features, commercials, PBS dues, 
industrials, etc. Professional work ethic. David (212) 
377-2121. 

CAMERAMAN: Award-winning, sensitive, effi 
cient. 10 yrs experience in docs 6* industrials, over- 
seas projects, Complete broadcast-quality Sony 

BVW-300A Beta SP pkg. Rates tailored to pri i 
budget. Can speak Japanese, S< >>tt, Publk Eye Prods., 

(212) 627-1244. 

CAMERAMAN: Owner Ikegami IK -240 | 
sional Hi8 pkg w lights, mic . tripod, dolly. Vt 
dot ex ENG. Current camera reporter 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 49 



ViuEU 



LKir 



Affordable Logging and 

Videotape Editing- 
Automated QuickTime™ 
Movies from your VCR 




Turns your computer into a 

powerful video editing utility. 

Controls consumer, industrial and 

most professional video equipment. 

Supports ViSCA and RS 422 VTRs. 

Infrared control for the record device and 
Head and Tail video Snap-Shots™ with all 
QuickTime™ video boards. Now supports 
Panasonic AG! 970 & 5700 



Beta SP to Beta SP 

3/4"SP interformat 

Character Generator 

Hi-8 transfers. Window dubs 

CMX EDL import & export 

24 hour access 

With editor 
$ 55/hr 

Yourself 

$ 40/hr 

S 300/day 

S 150/night 




Flexible rates. Will travel. 5-passenger station 
wagon avail. Fluency in Korean. Contact Kwi (212) 
274-0142. 

CAMERAMAN: Owner Sony EVW-300 pro Hi8 
pkg. NYC-based, flexible rates. Will travel. 
Conversational French & Italian. Background in 
photography 6k sculpture. For more info, contact 
John Anderson (212) 875-9731. 

CAMERAWOMAN w/ good ideas, easy to work 
w/. Own 16mm Arri BL, Bolex, video Hi8. Doc, 
experimental, narrative, music video. Engage pas- 
sionate projects. Lori Hiris (212) 628-3913. 

CASTING DIRECTOR offering professional 
complete audition services. An extensive file of 
principal 6k background talent. Fees negotiable. 
Call V. Bernard 6k Associates (212) 388-7210. 

CINEMATOGRAPHER w/ Aaton pkg, reg. 6k S- 
16 capable. Narrative, music videos, docs. Flexible 
rates for low budget projects. Kevin (212) 229- 
8357. 

I CINEMATOGRAPHER w/ interesting credits 
owns 35mm 6k S-16/16mm Aaton pkg for your fea- 
ture film, short or music video. Contact Brendan 
Flynt for info 6k reel at (212) 226-8417 (tel/fax) or 
ela292@aol.com (e-mail). 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY, experi- 
enced, w/ Arri 16 SR 6k Aaton S-16 pkgs, plus 
Mole Richardson lighting pkg, seeks interesting 
film projects in feature or short-subject form. Very 
| reasonable rates for new directors 6k screenwriters. 
(212) 737-6815; fax 423-1125. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY looking for 
interesting features, shorts, ind. projects, etc. 
Credits include features, commercials, industrials, 
short films, music videos. Aaton 16/S-16 pkg avail. 
Call Abe (914) 783-3159. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY looking for 
provocative dramatic films 6k feature shorts. Award 
winning, creative 6k efficient. Doc/commercial/net- 
work credits. Owner Aaton XTR Prod 6k Beta SP 
6k AVID MC400. Great reel. Call Richard (212) 
247-2471. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY w/ awards, 
talent 6k experience. Credits incl. features, com- 
mercials, industrials, docs, shorts 6k music videos. 
Owner of Aaton 16mm/S-16 pkg. 35mm pkg also 
avail. Call for my reel. Bob (212) 741-2189. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY w/ complete 
Arri 16 BL camera package. My rates are flexible 6k 
I work quickly. Features, shorts or music videos. 
Much indie film experience. Call Matthew at (617) 
244-6730 for reel. Boston based, willing to travel. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY, 15 yrs expe- 
rience, w/ or w/o equipment 6k crew. Special rates 
for documentaries. Fluent in Italian; EEC passport. 
Renato Tonelli, tel/fax (718) 478-2132; e-mail 
Renato 1 54@aol.com. 

DP W/ IKEGAMI DIGITAL CAMERA, BVW 

50 or BW 5, full field Betacam SP pkg (Arri lights, 
Vinten tripod, top-quality audio, transportation.) 
Network/int'l credits, competitive rates. Fluency in 
Spanish. Hal (212) 228-7748. 



50 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



EDITOR W/ AVID. Special rates for indepen- 
dents. All AVRs. Diane (212) 228-9494. 

ENTERTAINMENT ATTORNEY: Frequent 
contributor to "Legal Briefs" column in The 
Independent &. other magazines, offers legal services 
to film & video community on projects from devel- 
opment to distribution. Reasonable rates. Contact: 
Robert L. Seigel, Esq. (212) 307-7533. 

EXPERIENCED DIRECTORS OF PHOTOG- 
RAPHY w/ own Beta SP and EVW-300 Hi8 pack- 
ages, available for your production. Best daily or 
weekly rates in town. Call Steve at Legacy 
Productions to book shoots. (212) 807-6264. 

EXPERIENCED LOW-BUDGET DOCUMEN- 
TARY CAMERAMAN. Make the most of your 
limited dollars. Varied background. 3-chip Hi8 
camera, Steadicam JR, lights, sound gear. Contact 
Sam (800) 957-6296 (pager). 

LEARN THE AVID: Friendly individual instruc- 
tion in sunny, luxurious loft. Learn the tricks & 
shortcuts. $25/hr. (212) 645-2739. 

LOCATION SOUNDMEN: Over 20 yrs sound 
exp. w/ time code Nagra &. DAT, quality mics, etc. 
Will consider projects anywhere, anytime. Reduced 
rates for low-budget films/videos. Contact Harvey 
& Fred Edwards (518) 677-5720; beeper (800) 796- 
7363,ext/ P in 1021996. 

MUSIC BY COMPOSER who has scored over 7 
award-winning films. Owns &. operates complete 
music prod, facility w/ multitrack recording & 
works well w/ directors & editors. "The music 
speaks for itself." Nana Simopoulos (212) 727- 
3705. 

STEADICAM: Dolly smooth moves w/ the flexi- 
bility of a hand-held camera. Call Sergei Franklin 
(212) 228-4254. 

SU-CITY PICTURES EAST PRESENTS: The 
Screenplay Doctor, The Movie Mechanic & The 
Film Strategists — story editors/post-prod, specialists 
will analyze work-in-progress. Multimedia & adv. 
technology consultations. Competitive rates. (212) 
219-9224. 

WORD PROCESSING provided by certified pro- 
fessional secretary from handwritten/typed copy or 
taped dictation. Transcription of audiotapes &. 
videotapes also available. Donna Chambers, The 
Electronic Cottage, (770) 832-7188. 

Opportunities • Gigs 

CREW NEEDED: Cinematographer, ass't camera, 

ili. i besl elect., ass'l dir., sound recordist, boom 
Operator, etc. needed to work on feature film w/ 
award-winning director. Send resume & references 
ASAP to: IXX Box 87 5, New York, NY 10108. 

DP, SOUND, A.D. & P.M. WANTED for 2-3 
week shoot ot low-budgei independent 35mm fea- 
ture, ('mute h\v, in Manhattan in M.iy. If you have 
reasonable rates cm exp. send resume to MONTI; 
PI. Inc., 630 fifth Avenue, Level 20. NY. NY 
101 II; (212) 794-3000. 

FILM CREW TRAINEES NEEDED, (.round 
floor opportunity. Atlanta area production assis- 



NON-LINEAR EDITING FOR 

FILM • VIDEO • MULTIMEDIA 

SOUND DESIGN * SYNCING * MIXING 



PR0T00LS 




EXTENSIVE SAMPLING + SOUND UBRA8Y 

BETA SP ACQUISITION + LOCKUP 

CROSS PLATFORM MULTIMEDIA + WEB AUTHORING 



VFS Classical 
Animation 

For people with strong artistic abili- 
ty, the classical animation industry 
represents an outstanding high-paying 
career opportunity. VFS offers an inten- 
sive one-year portfolio production 
program comparable or superior to the 
best four-year programs in North 
America. 

If you're considering a career in ani- 
mation you owe it to yourself to find 
out more about the Classical Animation 
Program at Vancouver Film School. 



VFS Film 

From the international success of 
"Clerks" at Cannes, through the domi- 
nating presence at student film festivals 
throughout North America, through 
worldwide industry acceptance of grad- 
uate students, Vancouver Film School 
positions students for success. 

With the spectacular growth of the 
BC Film Industry over the past decade 
and predictions for even more growth 
to the end of the century, shouldn't you 
do the same? 

Position YOURSELF for success. 

Programs commence every two months. 

May / July / September / November / 

January '97 / March '97 

Call: 1-800-661-4101 
Call. Compare. Nothing does. 



Web: http://www.multimedia.edu 
-mail: query13@multimedia.edu 



VANCOUV 
#400- 1168 Han ' 




kNON-LINEAR CURE ALL? 



* off-line and transfers * 






Avid On-line 




mf 




April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 51 




SONY 



BerACAMPTJi 



212-714-3550 
292 5th Ave, 4th fl. 



A/E3 Roll $£5/hr 

Straight cuts $75/hr 

Window dubs/transfers 

Auto conform from CMX EDL's 

MEDIA Macintosh 

^T^^^^based nonlinear 

f [ § I § editing system 

$1000/wk includes 

9 gigabyte hard drive 

PAT storage backup 

Photoshop/Cosa After Effects 



GLC 



Productions 

1 1 WEEHAWKEN STREET 
GREENWICH VILLAGE, NY 1 OO 1 4 
TELEPHONE 212-691-1038 
FAX 212-691-6864 



Film/Video 



AVID™ SUITES 




RENTALS OR CREATIVE SERVICES 

■ NON-LINEAR OFF-LINE DIGITAL EDITING 

■ LONG OR SHORT FORMATS 

■ INSTANT ACCESS TO HOURS OF FOOTAGE 



3 DIGITAL AUDIO SUITES / 24 TRACK ANALOG 



RENTALS OR CREATIVE SERVICES 

■ sound design / sound editing / mixing 

■ adr / sfx / foley 

■ scoring / arranging 

■ live recording 

call 21 2-691 -1 038 

FOR BROCHURE / INFORMATION 



GLC FOR POST-PRODUCTION SOLUTIONS 



Mheast Negative Matchers, k 

"Setting New Standards In Negative Cutting" 

Negative Cutting to Film or Video Workprint 

SPECIALIZING IN VIDEO MATCHBACK TO THE AVID FILM COMPOSER 

□35mm □ Super 16mm □16mm 



25 Riverview Terrace • Springfield, MA 01 108 • 413/736-2177 • 800/370-CUTS 
North Miami Office 305/940-8878 



52 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



tants Si/or knowledgeable persons, send resume or 
call Cliff Lyttle for interview. Mecca Motion 
Picture Corp., 1100 Circle 75 Pky., ste. 800, 
Atlanta, GA 30339; (404) 808-7139. 

MEDIA FACULTY. Tenure-track ass't prof, for 
Spr. 97 & visiting fac. for Fall 96. MFA or PhD. 
Seek research scholar St/or creative artist in new 
media. Letter describing work; vita; evidence of 
teaching effectiveness & scholarship to: Search 
Committee Chair, Dept. of Media Arts, 226 Harvill 
Big., Univ. of Arizona, Box 210076, Tucson, AZ 
85721-0076. 3 references should send letters 
directly. Do not send creative work. Consideration 
begins 3/96 for visiting pos., 9/96 for tenure-track. 
EEO/AA/ADA. 

Preproduction • Development 

LATERNA-ENTERTA1NMENT, ind. film com- 
pany, is accepting WGA-registered feature-length 
screenplays. Send script & brief synopsis w/ SASE 
to Laterna-Entertainment, 39 St. Marks PI., ste. 3, 
New York, NY 10003-7946. 

I RUSSIA, CIS & E. EUROPE: Stretch your bud- 
get! US company in Moscow w/ contacts every- 
where provides location scouting & prod, services. 
Fax: 011-7-095-216-8162 or moscinema@glas. 
apc.org. Member AIVF 6k IDA. 

SCRIPTS/PROJECTS WANTED. Seek com- 
mercially viable films, TV & video; scripts (all gen- 
res) ; projects seeking development or completion 
funds; completed work. Screen Communications, 
fax (601) 268-6158 ext. 66 or e-mail 74677.3505 
@compuserve.com. 

POSTPRODUCTION 

$10/HR VHS SUITE. Open 7 days & eves. 
$20:3/4-3/4. $15:VHS-3/4. Free titles, Amiga & 
special effects! Also: Hi8; A/B roll, S-8 film; dubs; 
photo; slides; stills; audio; production; editor/train- 
ing. The Media Loft, 727 6th Ave. (23rd); (212) 
1 924-4893. 

$12/hr 3/4" SP SONY OFFLINE EDIT SYS: 
9850, 9800, 450 Panasonic WJ-MX 50 digital 
effects switcher for rent. Hi8 & VHS transfer. New 
equipt. $350/wk, $l,200/month. 17" stereo mon. 
Delivered. Student discounts. (212) 757-5013. 
YauC@aol.com. 

3/4" SONY OFFLINE SYSTEM delivered to you 

& installed: 5850, 5800, RM 440, 2 ' monitors, 
$500/wk, $l,600/mo. Delivery 6k installation incl. 
Equipment clean 6k professionally maintained. 
Thomas (212) 929-2439; (201) 667-9894. 

3/4" SP SONY OFFLINE SYSTEM W/ TIME- 
CODE: 9850 deck w/ timecode generator/reader, 
9800 deck w/ timecode reader, RM450 controller 
6k 2 13" monitors. Negotiable, low rates. Call (718) 
284-2645. 

16MM & 35MM OPTICAL SOUNDTRACKS! 

If you want "High Quality" sound for your film, you 
need a "High Quality" sound negative. Contact 
Mike Holloway, Optical Sound/Chicago Inc., 24 W. 
Erie, Chicago, IL 60610; (312) 943-1771 or (708) 
541-8488. 



16MM CUTTING ROOMS: 8-plate & 6-plate 
fully equipped rooms, sound-transfer facilities, 24- 
hr access. Downtown, near all subways & Canal St. 
Reasonable rates. (212) 925-1500. 

16MM SOUND MIX only $75/hr! Fully equipped 
mix studio for features, shorts, docs. 16mm post ser- 
vices: Picture & sound editorial, ADR, Interlock 
screening, 16 mag xfers (.06/ft incl. stock), 16mm 
edgecoding (.01/ft.). Call Tom (201) 807-0155. 

AVID 8000 & 1000 SUITES. Pleasant, friendly, 
comfortable uptown or midtown locations or deliv- 
ered to your studio. On-line or off-line, AVR 27, 
Protools, reasonable & affordable rates. (212) 595- 
5002 or (718) 885-0955. 

AVID $350 PER DAY! Online or offline. Avid 
Media Composer 1000 available in comfortable 
Soho suite for short or long term rental. Perfect for 
film or video originated projects. Call about dis- 
counts. (212) 228-7748. 

AVID-ON-THE-HUDSON: Avid Media Com- 
poser 400s w/ 5.51 software in rustic barn overlook- 
ing the Hudson, 25 min. from midtown. Includes 
Sony PVW-2800 Betacam SP recorder & 21 giga- 
bytes of storage. Competitive rates. Deb Clancy 
(914) 398-2119. 

BETA SP ON-LINE EDITING: $75/hr w/ editor. 
A/B roll, component or composite, wipes, dissolves, 
special EFX, mixer w/ CD & cassette players. Editor 
w/ 20 yrs exp. Non- smoking environment. East 
72nd St. Call Michael or Robin (212) 570-4040. 

BRODSKY & TREADWAY: Film-to-tape mas- 
ters. Reversal only. Regular 8mm, S-8, or archival 
16mm to 1" or Betacam- SR We love early B&.W & 
Kodachrome. Scene-by-scene only. Correct frame 
rates. For appointment, call (508) 948-7985. 

D-VISION OFFLINE SUITE (Beta, 3/4, SVHS, 
DA88, DAT). Elevator Pictures, Flatiron district. 
Competitive daily &. weekly rates. Shorts &. fea- 
tures welcome. Editor & tutorial optional. (212) 
206-6495. 

EDITOR w/ fully equipped 16mm editing facility 
w/ high-speed KEM to edit &7or sync features, 
shorts, etc. Reasonable rates for good projects. 
Award winning reel. Contact Lisa (718) 522-1230. 

GUARANTEED LOWEST RATES IN TOWN 

for D/Vision nonlinear 6k Sony 3/4" offline editing 
systems. Long/short term rental, your place or ours. 
Creative Thinking (212) 629-5320. 

INT'L VIDEO TRANSFERS: From US to PAL, 
PAL-M, PAL N, Secam; from PAL, PAL-M, PAL N 
to US. All video formats: VHS, S-VHS, Hi8, 3/4", 
Betacam. Fast, professional, affordable. Call Barry 
(212)941-5800. 

INTERFORMAT OFFLINE SUITE (3/4", Hi8, 
VHS). Sony system in clean, spacious uptown loca- 
tion. V( W850/9800 w/ RM450, 2 1 3" monitors, Hi8 
ok VHS. Rates: $12/hr, $85/day, $380/wk. Edi u 
$15 lu. Pubs in 3/4", VHS, Hi8. (212) 316-3842. 

VIDEOTAPE RESTORATION: Obsolete tor 
mats (incl. I 1" reel to reel ek 2" Quad), damaged ek 
aging tape remastered to .my format. Film to tape at 
$150/hr. using Rank Cintel. Fully equipped/experi- 
enced staff Call VidiPax at (212) 982-5676 ext. 
101. 



Krasnogorsk-3 16mm! 



Available in Super 16mm! 



Motorized! 

Crystal Sync Version 



Standard 
Wind-up Version 




$1,199! 



Just $ 



"Sophisticated optics, solid 
construction" - New York Times 
"A steal at twice the money" 

- Jack Watson Moviemaker Magazine 




The crystal sync K-3 camera comes with 
the standard set of accessories (see 
description at right) and 17-69mm lens. 
Thecamerawillrunat12,24,48fpsatsync 
and with the addition of an Aaton style 
speed crystal control all speeds between 
6 and 60f ps are possible. With the addition 
of the sync motor the K-3 is the ideal 
camera for music videos, second unit, or 
stu nt camera work, at less than the cost of 
a traditional crystal sync motor alone. 
Motor made in USA. 

Tel 212 
Fax 212 



5S1EH 



Motion 
Picture 
Equipment 



All cameras come with a complete set of 
accessories including 17-69mm zoom lens, 
pistol grip, shoulder brace, five glass filters 
(l\ID,UV,Lightand Dark Yellow, #2 Diopter), 
cable release, case, warranty, and more! 
The camera utilizes a rotating mirror reflex 
finder, and an operating range from 8- 
50fps with single frame. Made of solid 
aluminum construction and coated optics. 
Find out for yourself why the K-3 is the 
most popular camera in America. Call 
today for a free brochure. 

•219-8408 106 Franklin St. #2 

■219-8953 New York, NY 1 00 1 3 



AVJP PWCES 
KTltWO YOU? 

Come to UPTOWN AVID for 
the LOWEST PRICES in New York! 

Spacious editing suites featuring: 

• AVID 8000/AVID 1000/AVID 400 

• All Film Editing Options and Film Cutlists 

• All Picture Resolutions Including AVR 75 

• Four Channel Pro Tools Output 

• Beta SP SVHS VHS 3/4" SP 







UPTOWN AVID 

Uptown: 262 West 91st Street 

Downtown: 636 Broadway 

Tel: (212) 496-1118 Fax: 496-2514 




Call For Our Low, Low Rates! 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 53 




notices of relevance to aivf members are list- 
ed free as space permits. the independent 
reserves the right to edit for length and can 
make no guarantees about the number of 
placements for a given notice. please try to 
limit submissions to 60 words and indicate 
how long information will be current, 
deadline: 1st of the month, two months prior 
to cover date (e.g., may 1 for july issue). com- 
plete contact info (name, mailing address & 
tel.) must accompany all notices. send to: 
independent notices, fivf, 304 hudson st., 6th 
fl, ny, ny 10013. we try to be as current as pos- 
sible w/ information but please double check 
before submitting tapes or applications. 

Competitions 

WRITERS WORKSHOP NATIONAL SCRIPT- 
WRITING CONTEST is accepting scripts from 
throughout US. 5 to 6 winners will be chosen to 
receive $500 cash award. Winners also receive free 
tuition for critical evaluation of scripts before panel 
of motion picture agents, producers, writers & direc- 
tors. Deadline: Ongoing. For submission info, send 
legal size SASE w/ 60? postage to: Willard Rogers, 
Writers Workshop National Contest, Box 69799, Los 
Angeles, CA 90069; (213) 933-9232. 

Conferences • Workshops 

AMERICAN LEGION AUXILIARY accepting 
submissions for "Heart of America Awards," in cate- 
gories of feature, short subject and doc. that relate to 
women, the image of women, or the American fami- 
ly. 1/2" VHS only. Postmark deadline: May 1. Entry 
fee: $15. Submit to: Heart of America Awards, 
American Legion Auxiliary, 777 N. Meridian St., 3rd 
FL, Indianapolis, IN 46204; (317) 635-6291.' 

INT'L FILM & VIDEO WORKSHOPS IN TUS- 
CANY, ITALY. 30 1-wk workshops 6k master class- 
es in cinematography, directing, editing, writing, pro- 
ducing & camera work. Also, 4-wk introductory 
summer program for university students and others. 
Workshops begin May 5. Contact David H. Lyman 
(207) 236-8581; fax 2558. 

THE MID-EASTERN NYS COMMUNICA- 
TIONS & MEDIA ARTS CONFERENCE will be 
held April 26 at the Tryon Inn in Cherry Valley, NY. 
Focuses on regional organizations' 6k ind. producers' 
need for access to media prod. 6k distribution 
resources 6k info. Followed by exhibition 6k discus- 



sion on video artists and music. Free 6k open to the 
public. Reservation deadline April 12; call (800) 
721-8214 or email rap@tmn.com. Conference 
update on WWW: http://members.gnn.com/- 
improvart/ conf.htm. 

THE PERRY GROUP invites writers to submit 
character-based unproduced TV comedies for The 
Comedy Lab, a free workshop. Scripts will be staged 
in a four-workshop series beginning in June 1996. 
Send to Gary Swartz, literary manager, 221 Avenue 
A, #18, New York, NY 10009. 

STORYTELLING FOR THE NEW MILLENNI- 
UM, an event sponsored by the Kauai Institute and 
the American Film Institute, will address recent 
trends in filmmaking, new media, graphic design, 
sound design, Internet design 6k publishing with top 
figures in these fields. Hands-on digital workshops 
April 22-24, conference April 25-28, in Kauai, 
Hawaii. For info or to register, call (800) 999-4234 or 
(213) 856-7690; fax (213) 467-4578; WWW: 
http://www. afionline.org. 

VOLUNTEER LAWYERS FOR THE ARTS offer 
seminars on "Copyright Basics," "Not-for-profit 
Incorporation and Tax Exemption," and more. 
Reservations must be made: (212) 319-2910. 

Films • Tapes Wanted 

AIR 6k SPACE NETWORK, a new cable 6k satel- 
lite TV network, is looking for programs related to 
aviation, space, space flight, exploration, astronomy, 
weather, etc. Biographies are also of interest. Fiction, 
nonfiction, docs, educational, informational, or gen- 
eral entertainment. Contact: ASN, 2701 NW 
Vaughn St., ste. 475, Portland, OR 97210-5366; 
(503) 224-9821; fax: 241-3507. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF GRAPHIC ARTS, 

Washington, DC chapt., in search of innovative live- 
action 6k animated film shorts for a 2-hr. film festival 
in June. VHS previewing by April 30. Tapes 
returned. Please contact or send video to AIGA Film 
Night, Marty Anderson Design, 804 D Street, NE, 
Washington, DC 20002; (202) 544-1596. 

ARC GALLERY jurying for solo and group exhibi- 
tions for the 96-97 season. Categories: 1. All media 
including performance, video 6k film. 2. Raw Space, 
a dedicated installation space. Deadline: April 30. 
Send SASE for prospectus: ARC Gallery, 1040 W 
Huron, Chicago, IL 60622; (312) 733-2787. 

ART IN GENERAL seeks video works 6k guest- 
curated video programs for new monthly screening 
series. All kinds of work welcome, from experimental 
film 6k video to home videos; doc 6k activist to pub- 
lic access works. Send VHS tape (cued), resume 
6k/or brief statement 6k SASE to Art in General, 79 
Walker St., New York, NY 10013. For more info, call 
Joanna Spitzner (212) 219-0473. 

ASHLAND CABLE ACCESS seeks video shows. 
VHS, S-VHS 6k 3/4" OK, any length or genre. For 
return, incl. sufficient SASE. Send w/ description 6k 
release to Suzi Aufderheide, Southern Oregon State 
College, RVTV, 1250 Siskiyou Blvd., Ashland, OR 
97520; (541) 552-6898. 

AXLEGREASE, a Buffalo cable access program of 



ind. film 6k video, is accepting all genres, under 28 
min., 1/2", 3/4", 8mm, Hi8. Send labeled with name, 
address, title, length, additional info 6k SASE for 
tape return to Squeaky Wheel, 175 Elmwood Ave., 
Buffalo, NY 14201. (716) 884-7172; wheel- 
@freenet.buffalo.edu; WWW: http://freenet.buffa- 
lo.edu/~wheel. 

BLACK BOOT MEDIA PROJECT of Perry 
County Ind. Media Arts Center seeks ind. film 6k 
video works for regular series of roving screenings at 
various industrial, commerical 6k residential venues 
in Philadelphia and Harrisburg area. Submit S-8, 
16mm, VHS or S-VHS w/ SASE to PCIMAC, 
Lower Bailey Rd., RR2-Box 65, Newport, PA 
17074- For more info contact Jeff Dardozzi (215) 
545-7 



BLACK ENTERTAINMENT TELEVISION 

seeks films 6k videos by black ind. makers, directors, 
or producers for "Black Vision" portion of Screen 
Scene, weekly 1/2-hr show that previews TV lineup 
6k latest theatrical releases. Contact: Screen Scene, 
BET, 1899 9th St. NE, Washington, DC 20018; 
(202) 608-2800. 

BLACK VIDEO PERSPECTIVE, new communi- 
ty TV prod, in Atlanta area, seeks works for/by/- 
about African Americans. Contact: Karen L. Forest 
(404) 231-4846. 

BLACKCHAIR PRODS, currently accepting 
works of any genre for ongoing "Public Exposure" 
program. Works will be considered for a bi-monthly 
"video-zine," open-screenings, galleries, clubs, rave- 
parties, nat'l public-access programs, submissions to 
fests, competitions 6k calls-for-works. Let us use our 
marketing skills to get your works seen. No fee to 
submit. Send 1/2", Hi8, or 8mm w/ SASE for tape 
return to: Joel S. Bachar, Blackchair Prods., 2318 
Second Ave., #313-A, Seattle, WA 98121; wit- 
erain@nwrain. com. 

CAFE Y PELICULA looking for films 6k videos for 
possible monthly exhibition. Students' work wel- 
come. No payment; ongoing deadline. Send 3/4" or 
1/2" with appropriate release, credits, awards 6k per- 
sonal info to: Cafe y Pelicula, PO Box 362991, San 
Juan, PR 00936-2991; crubin@caribe.net. 

CHARISMATIC MASS TELEVISION seeks 
media art shorts for a new monthly screening series. 
All genres accepted in any length. Ongoing dead- 
line. Send artist statement, videotape 6k SASE. 3/4" 
preferred, Hi8 or 1/2" OK; returnable with SASE. 
Syracuse University, Art Media Studies, attn. 
Justine Wood, 102 Shaffer Art Bldg., Syracuse, NY 
13244. 

CHILDREN'S MEDIA PROJECT seeks tax- 
deductible donations of film 6k video equipment. 
Needs monitors, cameras, decks, etc. 71 Robinson 
Ln., Wappingers Falls, NY 12590; (914) 227-1838. 

CINCINNATI ARTISTS' GROUP EFFORT 

seeks proposals for exhibitions, performances 6k 
audio/video/film works to show in their galleries. 
Experimental, traditional 6k collaborative projects 
encouraged. Contact: CAGE, 1416 Main St., 
Cincinnati, OH 45210; (513) 381-2437. 

CINE CLUB seeks VHS submissions of ind. shorts 
for future programs. Send SASE 6k brief resume to: 



54 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



Cine Club c/o Sophie Fenwick, 335 Court St., 82, 
Brooklyn, NY 11231. Also welcomes proposals 
from ind. curators & others. 

C1NEQUEST, weekly 1/2-hr. TV series profiling 
best of nat'l & int'l ind. cinema &. video, looking for 
films/videos, all genres, less than 20 min. to air on 
30 min. cable show. Work over 20 min. will air on 
monthly special in Orlando, FL, market during 
primetime. Concept of show is to stretch percep- 
tions of conventional TV & expose viewers to 
scope &. talent of inds. Submit on 1/2" or 3/4" 
video. Submissions need not be recent, no limit or 
deadline. Will acknowledge receipt in 10 days. 
Send pre-paid mailer for return. Contact: Michael 
D. McGowan, Producer, Cinequest Productions, 
2550 Alafayia Trail, Apt. 8100, Orlando, FL 32826; 
(407) 658-4865. 

CITY TV, an Emmy Award-winning, progressive 
municipal cable channel in Santa Monica, seeks 
programming of any length, esp. works about 
seniors, disabled, children, Spanish-lang. &. video 
art. Our budget is limited, but we offer opportunity 
for producers to showcase work. Cablecast rights 
may be exchanged for equip, access. Contact: Lisa 
Bernard, City TV, 1685 Main St., Santa Monica, 
CA 90401; (310)458-8913. 

DANCE ON VIDEO wanted for the Spirit of | 
Dance, a live, 1 hr monthly program covering all 
types 6k aspects of dance. Under 5 min. or excerpts 
from longer works. S-VHS preferred. Produced at 
Cape Cod Community Television, South Yarmouth, 
MA. Call producers at (508) 430-1321, 759-7005; 
fax: 398-4520. Contact: Ken Glazebrook, 656 
Depot St., Harwich, MA 02645. 

DUTV-CABLE 54, a progressive, nonprofit access 
channel in Philadelphia, seeks works by ind. pro- 
ducers. All genres 6k lengths considered. No pay- 
ment; will return tapes. VHS, S-VHS 6k 3/4" 
accepted. Contact: George McCollough or Maria 
Mongelli, DUTV-Cable 54, Drexel University, 33rd 
6k Chesnut Sts., Philadelphia, PA 19104; (215) 
895-2927. 

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER seeks 
film 6k videos in all genres for a Fall 1996 exhibition 
on contemporary issues of immigration in the US. 
Send preview VHS, resume 6k description of work 
to L. Somi Roy, Roy/Emmons Associates, 115 
South Street, New York, NY 10038; (212) 227- 
6895; or print to Richard Pena, Film Society of 
Lincoln Center, 70 Lincoln Center Plaza, New 
York, NY 10023. 

HALCYON DAYS PRODS, seeks video segments 
(1-5 min.) by 15- to 25-yr.-olds for video compila- 
tion show. If piece is selected, you may have chance 
to be video correspondent for show. Work may be 
editorial, real-life coverage, political satire, slap- 
stick — you decide. Just personalize. Submit VHS or 
Hi8 (returnable w/ SASE) to: Mai Kim Holley, 
Halcyon Days Prod., c/o Hi8, 12 West End Ave., 
5th fl., NY, NY 10023; (212) 397-7754. 

HERE, ,i not-for-profit arts organization, seeks sub- 
missions of films &. videos for 1995-96 season. 
16mm, 8mm, 3/4", all genres 6s. lengths. Installation 
proposals also welcome. Send VHS, resume 6* 
description of work to: HERE, 145 Ave. of the 



BETA SP COMPONENT ON-LINE 



♦ ADO/Chyron Superscribe (optional) 

♦ Hi-8 Transfers 

♦ Duplication From All Formats 
Spec/a/ Night Rates 



AVID 



# Great 



On-Line 

♦ AVR27 - Component, in & out 
♦ 3D Real Time Effects 

Off-Line 

♦ MC-800 w/4 ch. Audio Playback 

Editor Training Available — Mac Graphics 

i =* Great Support # 



on track video 

1 04 W, 29th St., 1 2th Floor (21 2)244-0744 



FILM/VIDEO ARTS 

Persistence Of Vision ... Since 1968 



On-Line & Off-Line Editing 

Film & Video Equipment Rentals 

videotape Duplication 

Film-to-Tape Transfers 

also 



50 Classes Day and Evening 



AVID Training Workshops 
Certificate Programs in Film & Video Production 

Find out why FllmA/ldeo Arts has been 

New York's premiere Media Arts Center for more than 25 years 

Call for a free brochure & rate card Today! 



Film/Video Arts • 817 Broadway, 2nd Fl. • NYC 
212/673-9361 (t) • 212/475-3467 (f) 




eye I o jz>s 



pz>ie1:LJ res 



■tel 212 533 0330-fax 212 533 0391-email szerbeinterDort.net 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 55 




AVID 



IVfc Pii t -res 



666 Broadway New York City 

* 2liiillfa : 1 



Hi-8 Component Transfers ~ 



Video Duplication 



READY NEXT DAY- Mon-Fri 



3/4" U-matic & 1/2" VHS or Beta II Copies 



FROM 3/4", 1/2" VHS MASTER 

FROM ONE 20 MINUTES 30 MINUTES 
MASTER 3/4" 1/2" 3/4" 1/2" 



Add $25.00 per ONE INCH Master 

60 MINUTES 1/2" VHS/Beta II 
3/4" 1/2" 90 MIN. 120 MIN. 



One Copy $4.00 $4.00 


$6.00 $5.00 


$9.00 $8.00 


$11.00 


$14.00 


2-4 Copies 3.50 3.00 


5.50 4.50 


8.00 6.00 


8.00 


9.00 


5-9 Copies 3.00 2.50 


4.50 3.50 


7.00 5.00 


7.00 


8.00 


10-19 Copies 2.50 2.00 


4.00 3.00 


6.00 4.50 


6.00 


7.00 


1-4 RUSH Dubs. $8.00 


$1 1.00 


$17.00 


$22.00 


$28.00 


TC Burn In $10.00 


$14.00 


$26.00 


Inquire for LABELING 


Window Dubs 5.00 


7.00 


13.00 


& SHRINK 


WRAP 



PRICES ARE PER COPY- STOCK NOT INCLUDED. ASSEMBLY CHARGES ARE ADDITIONAL. 



EQUIPMENT: 3/4" Sony, 1/2" Panasonic 2 ch. industrial recorders and Grass 
Valley & Videotek distributors. Time base correction, optional, with Microtime 
and Tektronix equipment. TITLING & EDITING FACILITIES AVAILABLE 

3/4" & 1/2" EDITING Evenings & 24 Hour Access 
With and Without an Editor Instructions Available 
CHYRON TITLER AVAILABLE 
ONE LIGHT FILM TO TAPE TRANSFERS 

FILM STOCK. VIDEO TAPE, AUDIO TAPE, LEADER & SUPPLIES 

(212)475-7884 

814 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK, NY 10003 



JURAS GRAPHICS 

What do you want in an animation? 

You want it to look good and believable. 

We don't just simulate it We mafe reality. 

If you think it should be believable too, give us a call. We 

have the expertise and equipment like the big labs do. 

Call (708) 265-8811 



56 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



Americas, fmt. 1, NY, NY 10013, attn: film/video. 
Enclose SASE for more info, about next season. 

IN THE MIX, nat'l PBS series, seeks short (2-8") 
videos produced by teens or young adults. Any for- 
mat. Send w/ description, name & phone # to: In 
the Mix, 102 E. 30th St., NY, NY 10016, attn: stu- 
dent videos. 

IN VISIBLE COLOURS FILM & VIDEO 
SOCIETY seeks videos by women of color for 
library collection. Work will be accessible to mem- 
bers, producers, multicultural groups 6k education- 
al institutions. For info: Claire Thomas, In Visible 
Colours, 119 W. Pender, ste. 115, Vancouver, B.C. 
V6B1S5; (604) 682-1116. 

THE KNITTING FACTORY VIDEO 
LOUNGE seeks VHS tapes for ongoing weekly 
series of theme -based screenings. Any genre or j 
subject. Send tape with brief bio to Lisa Deanne I 
Smith, c/o AIVF, 304 Hudson Street, 6th fl., New] 
York, NY 10013. 

LATINO COLLABORATIVE, bimonthly 
| screening series, seeks works by Latino film/video- 
makers. Honoraria paid. Send VHS preview tapes 
to: Vanessa Codorniu, Latino Collaborative 
Bimonthly Screening Series, 280 Broadway, ste. 
1 412, NY, NY 10007; (212) 732-1121. 

I MIXED SIGNALS, award-winning cable TV 
series produced by the New England Foundation 
for the Arts, is accepting submissions for upcoming 
series on relationship between people & their work. 
Any style or genre. 28-min. max. w/ priority given 
to work under 6 min. Format: 1/2", though select- 
ed artists must provide a 3/4" or Beta broadcast- 
quality tape. Payment for selected work. Deadline: 
April 8. For appls & more info contact New 
England Foundation for the Arts, 330 Congress St., 

I 6th fl., Boston, MA 02210-1216; (617) 951-0010. 

I NERVOUS IMPULSE, nat'l screening series] 
focusing on science, seeks films/videos. Open to 
experimental, non-narrative & animated works 
that address scientific representation or knowledge 
or interplay between science & culture. Send pre- 
view VHS 6k SASE to: Nervous Impulse, Times 
Square Station, PO Box 2578, NY, NY 10036- 

|2578. 

NEW DAY FILMS, the premiere distribution 
cooperative for social issue media, seeks energetic 
ind. film- & videomakers w/ challenging social 
issue docs for distribution to non-theatrical mar- 
kets. Now accepting appls for new membership. 
(914) 485-8489. 

NEWCITY PRODS, seeks completed or in] 
progress docs on all subjects for monthly screenings 
on professional large screen video projector. 
Committed to establishing forum for new voices.) 
Send cassettes to NewCity Productions, 635 
Madison Ave., ste. 1101, NY, NY 10022; (212) 
753-1326. 

NEWTON TELEVISION FOUNDATION 

seeks proposals on ongoing basis from ind. produc- 
ers. NTF is nonprofit foundation collaborating w/ 
ind. producers on docs on contemporary issues. 
Past works have been broadcast on local & nat'L 
public TV 6k won numerous awards. Most are cur- 



rently in distribution in educational market. 
Contact NTF for details: 1608 Beacon St., Waban, 
MA 02168; (617) 965-8477; ntf@tmn.com or wal- 
shntf@aol.com. 

NORTH CAROLINA VISIONS, series broad- 
casting selected works statewide on public TV, 
seeks works of any genre (except corporate/instruc- 
tional) produced by ind. artists currently residing in 
NC. Modest monetary compensation & telecast 
interview of artist for works selected. Entry fee is 
$15 for individuals, $5 for students & NC Media 
Arts Alliance members; separate fee for each sub- 
mission. Contact Ellen Walters, NC Visions, 
Broadcasting/Cinema Program, 100 Carmichael 
Bldg., UNCG, Greensboro, NC 27412-5001; (910) 
334-5360; fax 334-5039; ncvision@hamlet.uncg- 
.edu. 

OCULAR ARCADE, new on ACTV in 
Columbus, OH, showcases ind. video (art, doc, 
experimental). Send Hi8, VHS, or 3/4" dub to 
Ocular Arcade, D. Master, 135 West 1st Ave., 
Columbus, OH 43201. 

OFFLINE seeks creative & independently pro- 
duced videos. The hr-long show airs biweekly on 
public access channels throughout NY State &. 
around the country. Submissions should not exceed 
20 min. Longer works will be considered for serial- 
ization. Formats: 3/4", S-VHS, Hi8 or VHS. Incl. 
postage for tape return. OffLine, 203 Pine Tree Rd., 
Ithaca, NY 14850; (607) 272-2613; 72137.3352- 
(n compuserve.com. 

THE OTHER SIDE FILM SHOW is looking for 
entries in all cats: narrative, doc, experimental, ani- 
mation, etc. for TV series of ind. films/videos. 
Submissions should be under 30 min. 3/4" video 
preferred, but VHS acceptable. Send w/ SASE for 
tape return to U. of South Florida, Art Dept., 4202 
E. Fowler Ave., Tampa, FL 33620-7350, attn: The 
Other Side. 

OVERWINED PRODUCTIONS, weekly inti- 
mate theater & public access program, seeks con- 
temporary film/video in any format to be showcased 
in & around Detroit area. Contact: Patrick Dennis, 
2660 Riverside Dr., Trenton, MI, 48183-2807; 
(313) 676-3876. 

PLANET CENTRAL, new LA-based cable sta- 
tion tocusing on the environment, global economy 
&. holistic health, is looking for story ideas &. video 
footage tor new fall alternative weekly news pro- 
l^ r. i t 1 1 Not in the News. Send info to: Planet Central, 
c/o World TV, 6611 Santa Monica Blvd., Los 
Angeles, CA 90038; (213) 871-9153; fax: 469- 
21 1 >S. 

REEL TIME AT P.S. 122, an ongoing quarterly 
screening series, now accepting submissions of 
recent ind. film & video works tor 1996-97 season, 
Exhibition formats include S-8, 16mm, 3/4" & 
VHS. Send VHS submission tapes, written promo- 
tion e* return postage to: Curator, Reel Time, PS. 
#122, 150 1st Ave., NY. NY 10009; (212) 477- 
582^x327. 

REGISTERED seeks experimental & non-nun 
tive videos about consumerism N 01 modern ritual 
fbi n ition.ilK touring screening. Send VHS for pre- 
view w SASE e* short description to: Registered, 



Micro-Finder! 



The Ultra Compact Director's Viewfinder 

Just $299.00! 

Special introductory offer. 

Specifications: 
Range mm: 

8.5 to 47mm 
18 to 100mm 
namorphic 36 to 200mm 
^Aj/3 " Video 7. 3 to 40mm 
1" Video 10 to 58mm 




■ 



I 



MK.A is proud to introduce the first affordable high 
quality director's finder, the Micro Finder. The Micro 
Finder features solid aluminum construction, coated 
glass optics, and compact design. Unlike most directors 
finders which are large and bulky the Micro Finder can 
be worn all day without neck strain. The Micro Find 
offers the most commonly used focal lengths for bo 
1 6mm, 35mm, 35mm anamorphic, and video use in a 1 
variety of aspect ratios - 1.33, 1.66, 1.85,2.35. Each 
finder comes with four drop in masks, strap, padded 
carry case, and six month warranty. 
rvffTfl Tel 212-219-8408 

JffllKK»T I ax 212-219-8953 




106 Franklin St. #2 
New York, NY 10013 



Concerned about quality?! 
No budget for the "Big Houses" ? 

" .%»G» Video offers high production value 
to independent projects 
Without compromising the quality. 

..-'>■ Avid on-line, off-line 

Digitize dwctfroml to VHS 

^Interformat on-line editing 

w/2 eh. Abekas 3-D digital effects, Chyron iNFiNiT! 

>• Duplication services available for all formats 

>* Beta SP/Hi-8 camera packages 

tkegami HL-55A Beta SP f Canon LI -A Hi~8 

w/orw/acrew 

Gall for demo reel 




R. G. Video 

21 W. 46th Street 

New York, NY 10036 

Tel: (212) 997-1464, Fax: (212) 827-0426 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 57 



The Outpost 

Edit on our Meclia 100 system for just $50 
per hour. Thai includes an operator, various 
tape formats including Beta SP, Macintosh 
and Ami^a graphics, and the Video Toaster. 

713 - "S 9 9 - 2 3 S 5 



Brooklyn. NY 




MULTIMEDIA PROGRAM 

WINTER 96 CLASSES 



Designing & Programming Web Pages 

2 Thursdays March 7&14 6:30-9:30 

Intro to Adobe Premiere 4.0 

3 Mondays. April 15,22.29, 7:30-9:30 

Intro to After Effects 3.0 

3 Weds., March 13, 20, 27 7:30-9:30 

Intro to Multimedia Technology 

1 Saturday, April 13, 1:00-4:00 

Intro to Fractal Painter 3.0 

3 Fridays, April 19, 26, May 3 6:30-8:30 

Navigation Design 

3 Tuesdays, April 1 7, 24, May 1 7:30-9:30. 

Advanced Macromedia Director 

3 Tuesdays, April 2, 9, 16 7:30-9:30 

Digital Video for Film & Videomakers 

3 Fridays, May 10,17, 24, 6:30-8:30 

Digital Audio Workstations 

3 Weds, March 1 3, 20, 27 7:30-9:30 



To register or to receive a complete class 
schedule contact Harvestworks at 596 
Broadway, Suite 602 at 431- 1 130 ext. 16. 
New Multimedia Production Studio rental 
rates also available. All classes are 
satisfaction guaranteed and limited to 12 
students. Includes 2 hrs of hands-on lab 



http://www.avsi.com/harvestworks I 




HIGH END BROADCAST 



N0N LINEAR EDITING 



REAL TIME TRANSITIONS 



HSf VIDEO MACHINE DPR 



HYBRID SYSTEM 



DISK OR TAPE 



18 GIG STORAGE 



LOSSLESS & 3:1 



TO OFFLINE 200:1 



BETACAM SP EDITING 

ANIMATION & GRAPHICS 

DUPLICATION 



(212) 219-9240 
Fax:(212) 966-5618 




non-Linear editing jjor Independents 



(D 212.254.4361 



attn. Joe Sola, PO Box 1960, Peter Stuyvesant 
Station, NY, NY 10009. 

RIGHTS & WRONGS, weekly, nonprofit human 
rights global TV magazine series, seeks story ideas 
& footage for upcoming season. Last yr 34 pro- 
grams covering issues from China to Guatemala 
were produced. Contact: Danny Schechter or Rory 
O'Connor, exec, producers, The Global Center, 
1600 Broadway, ste. 700, NY, NY 10019; (212) 
246-0202; fax: 2677. 

SAN FRANCISCO SHORT FILMS, a new orga- 
nization dedicated to supporting the short narra- 
tive film as a unique art form, seeks films under 35 
min. in length for screening programs. Filmmaker 
must be resident of 415, 510, 408, 707, 916, or 209 
area code regions in Northern CA. Films must 
have been completed on or after Jan. 1, 1993. All 
formats OK, but submit preview in VHS to RO. 
Box 424520, San Francisco, CA 94142. Sub- 
missions can also be brought to monthly meeting, 
held first Thursday of each month at 7 pm at 
Colossal Studios, 15th St. & DeHaro. 

I SEEKING WORKS by ind. filmmakers. 16mm, 
8mm & video for screening series in downtown 
Manhattan. Send VHS copy to Leslie Napoles, c/o 
CRC, 7th fl., 435 Hudson St., NY, NY 10014- 

SHORT FILM & VIDEO: All genres, any medi- 
! um, 1 min. to 1 hr. Unconventional, signature work 
in VHS or 3/4" for nat'l broadcast! Submit to: 
EDGE TV, 7805 Sunset Blvd., ste. 203, Los 
Angeles, CA 90046. 

SUBMISSIONS WANTED for exhibitions/- 
screenings & a collection of essays considering the 
relationships between the Middle East & the West 
on a personal or geo-political scale. We wil be look- 
ing at crises of identity, nationalisms/borders, nam- 
ing, gender/sexuality, class 6k the exoticization of 
difference. Send documentation of work in any 
medium, w/ postage if return requested: Public 
Domain, 186 Avenue B, #5, New York, NY 10009; 
ph/fax (212) 982-8967. 

TIGRESS PRODUCTIONS is seeking 8mm or S- 
1 8 footage of 42nd St./Times Square area from 

1960s 6k 70s for doc. All film returned, some paid, 
I film credit. Contact June Lang (212) 977-2634. 

TOXIC TELEVISION seeks broadcast- quality, 
creative video shorts (under 10 min.) for alterna- 
tive TV experience. Looking for works in anima- 
tion, puppetry, experimental, computers, etc. Send 
VHS or 3/4" tape 6k resume to: Tom Lenz, 6060 
Windhover Dr., apt. A, Orlando, FL 32819. 

TYME TOWER ENTERTAINMENT seeks fea- 
ture-length & short films for Ind. Filmmakers video 
series. 16mm, 35mm, B/W or color. Send 3/4" or 
1/2" VHS copy to Tyme Tower Entertainment, c/o 
Tyme Tower Home Video, 810 E. Coliseum Blvd., 
ste. 107, Fort Wayne, IN 46805-1234; (219) 481- 
5807. 

UNQUOTE TV, 1/2 hr nonprofit program dedi- 
cated to exposing new, innovative film 6k video 
artists, seeks ind. doc, narrative, experimental, per- 
formance works under 28 min. Program seen on 
over 40 cable systems nationwide. No payment. 
Submit to: Unquote TV, c/o DUTV, 33rd 6k 



58 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



Chestnut Sts., Philadelphia, PA 19104; (215) 895- 
2927. 

URBAN INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPO- 
RARY ARTS is accepting video & 16mm film in 
all genres for next season. Fee paid if accepted. 
Send VHS tape w/ SASE to: Film Committee, 
UTICA, 88 Monroe Ave. NW, Grand Rapids, MI 
49503. 

VIDEO ICON, a new program focusing on inno- 
vative video/film art & animation, is currently 
reviewing work. Send VHS or S-VHS copy to: 
Floating Image Prods, 710 Wilshire Blvd., ste. 405, 
Santa Monica, CA 90401; (310) 458-4550. 

VIDEOSPACE AT DECORDOVA MEDIA 
ARTS ARCHIVE: DeCordova Museum & 
Sculpture Park seeks VHS copies of video art & 
documentation of performance, installation art &. 
new genres from New England artists for inclusion 
in new media arts archive. Send for info & guide- 
lines: Videospace at DeCordova, DeCordova 
Museum, 51 Sandy Pond Rd., Lincoln, MA 01773- 
2600. 

Publications 

AEIOU.2 (ALTERNATIVE EXHIBITION 
INFORMATION OF THE UNIVERSE) pro- 
vides descriptions and submission information on 
over 220 exhibition venues, nat'l & int'l, showing |Jj 
challenging, alternative ind. film &. video. Avail, for 
$7 (incl. addressed mailing label) from AEIOU.2, 
Film Arts Foundation, 346 Ninth St., 2nd fl., San 
Francisco, CA 94103. 

ART ON FILM DATABASE wants to know: 
Have you produced film, video or video disc on 
visual arts? Send info on prod, to Program for Art 
on Film Database, a computer index to over 19,000 
prods. Interested in prods on all visual arts topics. 
Welcome info on prods about artists of color & 
multicultural art projects. Send info to: Art on Film 
at Columbia University, 2875 Broadway, 2nd fl., 
NY, NY 10025; (212) 854-9570; fax: 9577. 

DATABASE & DIRECTORY OF LATIN 
AMERICAN FILM & VIDEO organized by Int'l 
Media Resources Exchange seeks works by Latin 
American &. US Latino ind. producers. To send 
work or tor into: Karen Ranucci, IMRE, 124 
Washington Place, NY, NY 10014; (212) 463-0108. 

DIRECTORY OF RESEARCH GRANTS 1996, 

providing current info on nearly 6,000 funding 
sources, is now available. Volume is 1,224 pages 
and costs $135 plus 1 0"«> tor shipping C* handling, 
as well as sales tax in AZ & CA. To order, contact 
The Oryx Press, 4041 North Central Ave., ste. 700, 
Phoenix, AZ 85012-3397; (800) 279-6799. 

FELIX: A JOURNAL OF MEDIA ARTS & 
COMMUNICATIONS is published once a yr. by 
The Standby Program & Kathy High. Featuring 
articles sV artisi pages by established e* emerging 
raediamakers, FELIX is dedicated to promoting dia- 
logue on video art c* ind. media. To order subs, op- 
tion or single issue contact: FELIX/Standhv, PO 
Box IS4. NY, NY 10012-0004; (212) 219-0951; 

tax: 0563. 



An Edit Room with windows?!? 
YES! 

New AVID Media Composer 4000 

System 5.2 w/ AVR-27 & 18 GB 

Available in our Sunny SoHo studio or delivered to you. 
• Office space available • 



Jel 



contact Rob Lawson at: 
Lovett Productions, Inc. 



(212)242-8999 




HARMONIC 





Video Viewing 
1/2 & 3/4 Video Editing 
Video Cassette Duplication 
Film to Tape Transfers 
Slides to Tape Transfers 
16mm Projector Rental 
S-8 Processing 



Machine Cleaned, Optically Tested. & 

GUARANTEED FOR MASTERING 

3/4' Used Video Cassettes 

NEW, MAJOR BRAND" VIDEO CASSETTES 
AT DISCOUNT PRICES 



RAFIK 



(212)475-7884 



I STOCK VIDEO 'Art AUDIO TAPE LEADER & SuPPUCS 





Video 


Rentals 


Location 


packages 


j 


BetaSP/Hi8mm/Audio/Lighting/Crew or rental 


Editing 






S-VHS location rentals or on-site 


Reasonable rates 




Great packages 






212 


260 7748 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 59 




278 Babcock St. Boston, MA 02215 
61 7-254-7882 Phono - 61 7-254-7 1 49 Fax 




mfil 



NON-LINEAR 

EDITING 



MEDIA 100 SYSTEM 

• True broadcast-qua I ity 

• "Off-line" and "On-line" with 
"AihOn-One"™ 1 mastering 

• Multi-track, 16-bft, 44.1kHz 
(CD-quality) audio mixing 

• CG, Color FX, Motion FX 

• BetaSP Deck 



PLUS,.. 

ANIMATED 
GRAPHICS, 
KEYS& 

cowpoemNG 




AFWR 
EFFECTS! 




IN©. 



1212)226-1152 

• COMPE T E T IV E RATES 

• CALL FOR FREE CONSULTATION 




OFF-LINE 
AVID 4000 
SONY 3/4" 
DUPLICATION 

G6NIX 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK, 10012 
FAX 212 941 5759 



LIBRARY OF AFRICAN CINEMA now 

includes 25 titles from 12 countries representing 22 
directors. Incl. in the 1995-96 guide are new docs 
& feature films, a controversial South African TV 
series, an anthology of short films & a "perfor- 
mance film." Free copies avail, from California 
Newsreel, 149 Ninth St. #420, San Francisco, CA 
94103; (415) 621-6196; fax: 6522; e-mail: news- 
reel@ix.netcom.com. 

MEDIA MATTERS, Media Alliance's newsletter, 
provides comprehensive listings of New York area 
events & opportunities for media artists. For a free 
copy, call Media Alliance at (212) 560-2919 or visit 
their web site at http://www.mediaalliance.org. 

MEDIANET: A Guide to the Internet for Video 
and Filmmakers. Available free at http://www.- 



infi.net/~rriddle/medianet.htm, or 
dle@infi.net. 



e-mail rrid- 



NATIONAL TRUST FOR HISTORIC 
PRESERVATION offers History for Hire: Using 
Cultural Resources as Film Locations, an ongoing 
series illustrating the benefits & drawbacks of film 
prods in museums, private residencies and along 
historic streets. $6 per issue; 10+ copies at $3 plus 
shipping &. handling. Information Series, National 
Trust for Historic Preservation, 1785 Massa- 
chusetts Ave., NW, Washington, D.C. 20036; 
(202) 673-4286. 

I SHORT VIDEO MOVIES: To finish our hand- 
book on the short video prod, process, we want to 
include your experiences w/ improvised scenarios 
or scripts, non-professionals or pros. Let's trade 
reels. Contact David Shepherd, Group Creativity, 2 

I Washington Sq. Vill. #70, New York, NY 10012; 
(212) 777-7830. 

Resources • Funds 

BOSTON FILM/VTDEO FOUNDATION seeks 
proposals for fiscal sponsorship from ind. producers. 
No deadline or genre restrictions. Reviewed on an 
ongoing basis. Contact BF/VF for brochure: Cherie 
Martin, 1126 Boylston St., Boston, MA 02215; 
(617) 536-1540; fax: 3540; e-mail: bfvf@aol.com. 

CREATIVE PROJECT GRANTS: Subsidized 
use of VHS, interformat and 3/4" editing suite for 
independent creative projects. Doc, political, pro- 
poganda, promotional and commercial projects are 
not eligible. Editor/instructor available. Video work 
may be done in combination with S-8, Hi8, audio, 
performance, photography, artists, books, etc. 
Studio includes Amiga, special effects, A6*B roll, 
transfers, dubbing, etc. Send SASE for guidelines to 
The Media Loft, 727 6th Ave., NY NY 10010; 
(212) 924-4893. 

DCTV Artist-in-Residence is now accepting appls 
for $500 worth of equipment access on ongoing 
basis w/in 1 yr. When 1 funded project is complete, 
DCTV will review appls on file & select next pro- 
ject. Pref given to projects already underway. For 
appl, send SASE to: AIR, c/o DCTV 87 Lafayette 
St., NY, NY 10013-4435. 

ILLINOIS ARTS COUNCIL (IAC) SPECIAL 
ASSISTANCE ARTS PROGRAM: Matching 
grants of up to $1,500 avail, to IL artists for specif- 



60 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



ic projects. Activities that may be funded are: reg- 
istration fees & travel to attend conferences, semi- 
nars, or workshops; consultant fees for resolution of 
specific artistic problem; exhibits, performances, 
publications, screenings; materials, supplies, or ser- 
vices. Funds awarded based on quality of work sub- 
mitted &. impact of proposed project on artist's pro- 
fessional development. Appls must be received at 
least 8 wks. prior to project starting date. Degree 
students are not eligible to apply. Call (312) 814- 
6750. 

MEDIA ALLIANCE assists NYC artists & non- 
profit organizations in using state-of-art equipment, 
postprod. & prod, facilities at reduced rates. 
Contact: Media Alliance, c/o WNET, 356 W. 58th 

St., NY, NY 10019; (212) 560-2919. 

PACIFIC ISLANDERS IN COMMUNICA- 
TIONS provides grants for development of nat'l 
public TV broadcast programming by & about 
indigenous Pacific Islanders. Appls available from 
PIC, 1221 Kapiolani Blvd., #6A-4, Honolulu, HI 
96814; (808) 591-0059; fax 1114; piccom@- 
elele.peacesat.hawaii. edu. 

POLLOCK-KRASNER FOUNDATION gives 
financial assistance to artists of recognizable merit 
& financial need working as mixed-media or instal- 
lation artists. Grants awarded throughout yr., 
$l,000-$30,000. For guidelines, write: Pollock- 
Krasner Foundation, 725 Park Ave., NY, NY 10021. 

RESIDENCY PROGRAM at the Experimental 
Television Center (ETC) is accepting appls. 
Program offers opportunity to study the techniques 
of video image in intensive 5-day residency pro- 
gram. Artists work on variety of cutting edge & hi- 
tech equipment. Program open to experienced 
video artists. Appls must incl. resume &. project 
description, as well as videotape of recent work (if 
you are a first time applicant), either 3/4" or VHS 
formats, w/ SASE for return. Write: ETC Ltd., 109 
Lower Fairfield Rd., Newark Valley, NY 13811; 
(607) 687-4341. 

STANDBY PROGRAM is nonprofit media arts 
org. dedicated to providing artists & nonprofits 
access to broadcast quality video post, services at 
reduced rates. For guidelines & appl. contact: 
Standby Program, Box 184, NY, NY 10012-0004; 
(212) 219-0951; fax: 0563. 

TEACHERS MEDIA CENTER is dedicated to 
educators interested in using video technology as a 
learning tool in the classroom. Latest project is set- 
ting up nat'l 6k int'l video pen pal exchanges; would 
like to hear from interested schools, individuals, or 
Organizations. Also interested in creating a nat'l 
network of educators who are interested in any or 
ill aspects of the growing multimedia & media lit- 
eracy movements in education. Contact Teachers 
Media Center, 158 Beach 122nd St., Rockaway 
Beach, NY 11694; (718)634-3823. 

VISUAL STUDIES WORKSHOP MEDIA 
CENTER in Rochester, NY, accepts proposals on 
Ongoing basis tor its Media Access program. Artists, 
Ind. producers & nonprofits awarded access at 
reduced rates, prod. & postprod. equipment for 
work on noncommercial projects. For appl., tour, or 
more info, call (716) 442-8676. 



JT\ 1 1 LJ C0MP0SERUI/W 

' BROADCAST QUALITY 

§ 

♦ FILM COMPOSER OPTION (24 FRAMES) 

♦ PRO-TOOL SOUND EDITING OPTION 

♦ 24 Tracks Video Layering 

♦ 24 Tracks Audio 

♦ 4 Ch. Audio Playback 

♦ Real Time Special Effects & Titles 



BETACAM-SP ON-LINE 



♦ INTERFORMAT with 3/4" SP, Hi-8, 1/2" 
♦ A/B Roll with Full List Management 
♦ Digital EFX Switcher / Char. Gen. 
♦ DMC Slow Motion / Still Store 

♦ SOHOLoc. /Exp'd Editors 



OFF-LINE 



♦ 3/4", Hi-8, S-VHS, VHS Editing 
♦ XFERS / WINDOW DUBS / DUPS. 



SOLAR 



Productions 

580B'WAY, NYC 10012 



212.925.1110 




We Wai Your Concepts To Become Rem 

A ONE-STOP PRODUCTION CENTER. WE CAN HELP TO KEEP YOU 
WITHIN BUDGET BY KEEPING DOWN UNFORESEEN EXPENSES CAUSED 
BY HAVING A CONFUSION OF CONTRACTORS AND SUPPLIERS. 

• Total equipment availability 

• Seasoned, open-minded staff 

• Flexible pricing packages 

Having lop-line equipment is only as effective as the staff that supports it. Having worked on 
everything from music videos, low-budget features, and commercials to multi-million dollar 
films gives us the ability to support you in creating your project as you require. At Castlewav. 
we want your concepts to become a reality. 



100 N. Avonclale Road • Avondale Estates, GA • 30002 • 404'508'2135 • FAX 404>508'2139 

htlp://wwwcastlewavcom 



AVID RENTAL 212.463.7830 





UJ.un«a«.i,'n»rn 

41 Union square west suite 1228 NYC 10011 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 61 



Full Production, Post-Production, and Creative Services 



-Directors, Writers, DPs, and Editors Available- 

Specializing in cost-saving options, best rates in NYC 



Production: 

•Cut-rate Hi8, BetaS/* packages 
•Professional Crews 
•Casting/Loc. scouting 




P 

r 

•Studios Video Production 

WE OFFER TRAINING! 

~Low project rates available~Call for consultation today- 



.200 Broadway, Stc. 2B, NY, NY 10001 212-889-l60Wax-212-889-l602 



Post-Produaion: 
• Toaster 4000 A/B Roll 
•Hi8, 3/4"SP, Beta5/> 
•CG, TBCs, the workA 
•Affordable 3D animation 



VID 



AVID 



AVID 

VHS and 3/4" off-line 
editing also available 

947-8433 

(low rates) 

David Royle Productions 

*330 West 42nd Street 

New York, NY 10036 




WE ARE 
THE EXPERTS! 




NEW YORK 

420 LEXINGTON AVENUE 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 101 70-01 99 

TEL: (212) 867-3550 • FAX: (212) 983-6483 

JOLYON F. STERN, President 

CAROL A. BRESSI, Vice President 



AFFILIATES IN: LONDON • PARIS • MUNICH 




24 Digital Tracks 



MERCER STREET 

simn 

DIGITAL AUDIO 
- PRODUCTION - 

for Film and Video 
and Multimedia 



Sound Design 



Original Music 



Sound Effects 



Voiceover and ADR 



MIDI Room 



Protools/Fairlight/ADAT 



Discount rates for independents 



133 MERCER ST. NYC 10012 • 212.966-6794 • E-mailmercerst@aol.com 



MEMORANDA: continued from p. 64 

St. Louis, MO: 

When: 3rd Wednesday of each month, 7 p.m. 
Where: Midtown Arts, 3207 Washington St. 
Contact: Tom Booth, (314) 776-6270 

Washington, DC: 

When: Monday, April 15, 7 p.m.: "Video Art"; 
Wednesday, May 15,7 p.m.: "Interactive Tech- 
nology and Independent Filmmaking" 

Where: Washington Performing Arts, 400 7th 
St. NW (at D St.) 

Contact: April: Rebecca Crumlish, (202) 328- 
8355; May: Lorie Paterson, (301) 340- 
9630/(202) 414-8151. 

ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING 

The AIVF annual membership meeting will be 
held Friday evening, April 26, at Anthology 
Film Archives, 32 Second Avenue, NYC. The 
meeting is open to all; AIVF members will 
receive a separate notice in the mail. 

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS 

It's time to think about nominations for the 
AIVF board of directors. Board members are 
elected to a three-year term of office; the 
board gathers four times per year in NYC for 
weekend meetings (AIVF pays the travel costs 
if you live elsewhere) . 

We have an active board; members must be 
prepared to set aside time to fulfill board 
responsibilities, which include: 

• Attendance at all board meetings and par- 
ticipation in conference calls when necessary; 

• Preparation for meetings by reading advance 
materials; 

• Active participation in one or more commit- 
tees as determined by the organization's needs 
and as requested by the board chair or execu- 
tive director; fulfillment of commitments with- 
in agreed-upon guidelines; 

• General support of the executive director 
and staff as needed. 

Board nominations must be made by cur- 
rent AIVF members in good standing; you may 
nominate yourself. Board members must be at 
least 19 years old. To make a nomination, send 
or fax (212/463-8519) the name, address, and 
telephone number of the nominee and nomi- 
nator; we cannot accept nominations over the 
phone. Nominations should be sent to the 
attention of Pamela Calvert. We will also 
accept nominations at the AIVF annual meet- 
ing on April 26. 



62 THE INDEPENDENT April 1996 



The Foundation for Independent Video and Film (FTVF), the educational affiliate of the Association of 
Independent Video and Filmmakers (AIVF), supports a variety of programs and services for the 
independent media community, including publication of The Independent, seminars and workshops, and an 
information clearing house. None of this work would be possible without the generous support of the AIVF 
membership and the following organizations: 

The Center for Arts Criticism, John D. and Catherine T MacArthur Foundation, National Endowment for the 
Arts, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, New York Community Trust, New York State Council on the Arts, 
Rockefeller Foundation, and Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. 

We also wish to thank the following individuals and organizational members: 

Benefactors: Patrons: Sponsors: 

Irwin W Young Mary D. Dorman, Karen Freedman, Ralph Arlyck, Coulter &. Sands, Inc., David W. Haas, 

Jeffrey Levy-Hinte, James Schamus, Dr. V Hufnagel/Woman's Cable Network, 

Robert L. Seigel, Esq., Julio Riberio, George C. Stoney, Debra Zimmerman 
Roger Weisberg 



Business/Industry Members: 

Acordia Hogg Robinson, NY, NY; Asset Pictures, NY, NY; Avid Technology, Tewksbury, MA; Bjorqvist Films, 
Brooklyn, NY; Blackside Inc., Boston, MA; Blue Yonder Films, Tulsa, OK; CA. Productions, NY, NY; Caribbean Soul 
Entertainment, Brooklyn, NY; Color Lab, Rockville, MD; Dasistas Creative Group, Madison, WI; Douglas, Gorman, 
Rothacken, NY, NY; Ericson Media Inc., NY, NY; FPG Int'l, NY, NY; Fallon, McElligott, Minneapolis, MN; Films Transit, 
Montreal, Quebec; 40 Acres & A Mule, Brooklyn, NY; Fuller Productions, NY, NY; Greenwood/Cooper Home Video, 
Los Angeles, CA; Irivne Pictures, NY, NY; JCV Productions, NY, NY; KJM3 Entertainment Group, NY, NY; Lonsdale 
Productions, Glendale, CA; Loose Moon Productions, NY, NY; Joseph M. McCarthy, Brooklyn, NY; Media Consultants, 
Inc., Raleigh, NC; Mikco, NY, NY; Passporte Productions, NY, NY; Real Life Entertainment Inc., LA, CA; Barbara 
Roberts, NY, NY; Sandbank Films, Hawthorne, NY; Somtbrd Entertainment, Los Angeles, CA; Sub Pop East, Dorchester, 
MA; TV 17, Madison, AL; Telluride Film Festival, Telluride, CO; Tribune Pictures, NY, NY; Unapix Entert., Inc., NY, 
NY; Video Utah!, Salt Lake City, UT Washington Square Films, NY, NY; Westend Films, NY NY; White Night 
Productions, San Diego, CA. 

Nonprofit Members ^^^^^^^^^ 

ACES Media Arts Center, New Haven, CT; ACS Network Prtxluctions, Washington, DC; AVD Hans Strom 
Biblioteket, Volda, Norway; AVFN Int'l, Anchorage, AK; Access, Houston, TX; Alternate Current, NY, NY; The 
American Center, Paris, FR American Civil Liberties Union, NY, NY; Ann Arbor Community Access TV Ann Arbor, 
MI; Ann Arbor Film Festival, Ann Arbor, MI; Appalshop, Whitesburg, KY; John Armstrong, Brooklyn, NY; Art Matters 
Inc., NY, NY; The Asia Society, NY, NY; Assemblage, NY, NY; Athens Center for Film 6k Video, Athens, OH; Austin 
Film Society, Austin, TX; Benton Fern., Washington, DC; Blackside, Inc., Boston, MA; CNC, Washington, DC; 
Carnegie Inst., Pittsburgh, PA; Carved linage Productions, NY, NY; Center for Investigative Reporting, San Francisco, 
CA; Center for New American Media, NY, NY; Chicago Video Project, Chicago, IL; Qie Film Association, NY, NY; 
Colelli Productions, Columbus, OH; Gilumbia Gillege, Chicago, IL; C)mmand Gimmun., Rye Bnxik, NY; Gimmun. 
Arts, Old Westbury, NY; Gimmun. Arrs-MHCC, Greshamy, OR Gimmunity Television Network, Chicago, IL; Denver 
Film Society, Denver, CO; Duke Univ., Durham, NC; Dyke TV NY, NY; Eclipse Gimmun., Springfield, MA; 
Educational Video Gnter, NY, NY; HwarJ^ilrns, Eagle Bridge, NY; Empowerment Project/Kasper & Trent, Chapel 
Hill, NC; Eximus Gimpany, Fort Liudordale, FL; Fallout Shelter Productions, Mansfield, OH; The Film Crew, 
Wixxiland Hills, ( A; F. >x ( :h,,pd High School, Pittsburgh, PA; ( ireat Likes Film & Video, Milwaukee, WI; ITVS. St. 
Paul, MN; Idaho Stare Univ., Pncatello, ID; Image Film Video ( Inter, Atlanta, GA; Int'l Cultural Prgm, NY, NY; Int'l 
Film Seminars, NY, NY; Jewish Film Festival, Berkeley. CA; KPBS, S, in Diego, CA; Ki implex Studio Mcrdeka, Selangor, 
Malaysia; Little City Fdn./Me^^rtsffiforine, IL; Long Row Group Inc., Bnxikline, MA; Manhattan Neighborhtxxl 

IL; Media Resource Gntrc, Adelaide, Australia; Mesilla Valley Film Society, 
it, Irving TX; Miranda Productions, Boulder, CO; Missoula Gimmunity Access, 
.1. CA; NY Inst ot Technology, ( 'Id Westbury; NY; Nat. Gnter for Film & Video 
Preservation, Lixs .Angeles, C. A; N.ii. I ririnoGimmurut\ ( eim-i K( I.I, Lis Angeles, t 'A; Nat. Video Resources, NV[ 
NY; Neighhirhood Film Video i 'inject IfiiJadelphia, PA; No m, lm ., NY. NY; New Image Prtxluctions, Lis Vegas, NV; 
New Liberty Product* >ns, )U Media Arts ( x'ntei. Seattle, \X A; Philadelphia, PA; C )hio Arts Council, Columbus, OH; 
Ohio Univ., Athens, OH;Bne Eighty One Prflucnons, NY, NY; ( Xitsidc in July, NY, NY; Pennsylvania State Univ., 
Univ. Park, PA; PiasburglWimrnakers, Pittsburgh, PA; Post Modem Productions, Elsah, IL; Promontory Point Films, 
Albany, NY; Public Fx^e«»^^^yr^1FJ}amy States Film Festival, Seattle, \VA; Merlin,, Rich, NY, NY; Paul 

Robeson Fund Fundi, i I change. NY, W; Ross Film I! ... M In M ! ',, .. ' , ' , . ■ ' , I.. ,, ,! \ 

Media Studies, I luitalo.Mjfj&inlTincLsm Art Inst., Sm I i.uhko, ( \, School of the Art Inst, Chicago, IL; Scribe Video 
( X-nter, Philadelphia, P ASout hw^^Pnate Med i Pr. .,et l, Houston. TX; Squeaky Wheel, Buttalo, NY; Str.m , I ilm-, 
Hollywood, CA; SundBfcist.^yXngeles, ( \, Swiss Inst., NY. NY; Terrace Films. Brooklyn, NY; Tliurston 
Gimmunity televi.su >n^^H\ e. ^^Bia. WA; Trinity Square Video, Iiironto, ( >ntano; Iucson Gimmunity Gible 
dtp., Tucson, AZ; I MABjSdniol of S j ul \\ i mI Media ( enter. Baltimore, MD; I 'niv. ot Ariaona, Iucson, AZ;Univ. 
of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI; Univ. ot HbJn, NF; I 'niv. ,.t Southern Honda, Tampa, FT; I in\. ot Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee, WI; VA festival >t~ American Rhj9 Farlotte-sville, VA; VI.E.W Video, NY, NY Veritas Intl.. Elsah, IL 
Video Data Rank, ChicagojL^^^WBBHivg, Manitoba; Vox Pnxlucnons, Inc., San Fram ixo, I A. WNET I I 
NY, NY; WTTW/Chicago, Chicago, IL; W. Holkw.xxl Public Access, West Hollywood, CA. Wexner ( 'am, ( i iumbus, 
OH; Women Make Mimes. NY, NY; York I : mv. Libraries, North York. Chit, mo. 



Network, NY, NY; Media 
Mesilla, NM; Milestone Ent 
Missoula MT NAMAG 




THE 




A non-profit media arts organi- 
zation providing access to state- 
of-the-art video post-production 
services for artists and indepen- 
dent producers at drastically 
discounted rates ™ Wide range 
of services available ~ Standby 
publishes FELIX, A Journal of 
Media Arts and Communication. 



Some of Standby's hourly rates: 

• Interformat editing: $85 

• One inch editing: $120 

• Non-linear editing: $60 

• Audio post-production: $60 

• Chyron: $10 

• ADO: $10 

First extra service free! 



PO Box 184, Prince Street Station 
New York, NY 10012 
Phone: (212)219-0951 
Fax: (212)219-0563 



SHOOTING IN 
THE SOUTH? 

Check out why Allied handled 
28 features in 1994! 

•k Quality processing (16, Super 16 
& 35mm) 

* Overnight processing/A. M. dailies 

• Video dailies with KEYKODE™, 
TLC Edit Controller yy 

• Interlock - Nagra T, 16 
& 35 mag stripe 

* Off-line, multi-format on-line 
& D-2 editing 

* Complete sound post facility for 
film & video - SSL Screen Sound, 
Foley, mixing, editing 

• Package pricing available 

/- — \ • ALL CINDER 

MUB>\ 0MER00F 

Digiipl Technologies Corp 



6305 N. O'Connor Road, Suite 1 1 1 

Irving, TX 75039-3510 

Tel: (214) 869-0100 

Fax: (214) 869-2117 or (214) 432-1710 



April 1996 TH E I N DEPE NDENT 63 




by Pamela Calvert 
SPRING EVENTS 

MEET AND GREETS 

These are opportunities for members to meet pro- 
ducers, distributors, funders, programmers, and 
others to exchange information in an informal 
atmosphere at the AIVF offices. Free; open to 
AIVF members only. Limited to 20 participants. 
RSVP required; (212) 807-1400x222. 

MICHELE FORMAN 

Director of Development, 40 Acres and a Mule 
Productions 

Spike Lee's independent production company 
Event co-sponsored by Black Filmmaker Foundation 
and open to AIVF and BFF members- 
Wednesday, May 5, 6:30 p.m. 

SPECIAL EVENT with legendary producer's rep 
John Pierson (Spike, Mike, Slackers and Dykes) at 
Schenectady salon April 3 — see salon listings below! 

IN THE WORKS 
AN OPEN SCREENING PROGRAM 

Responding to popular demand, we have started a 
works-in-progress program for members. We're 
developing it month-by-month to serve the needs 
and interests of the members. So call to show your 
work, or come and see what's in the pipeline. Four 
I 0-minute slots per evening will be assigned on a first- 
registered, first-served basis, and are available to 
AIVF members only. You do not need to register or be 
a member to attend. 

When: Tuesday, April 16, 7:00 p.m. 
Where: AIVF office screening room 
Contact: Leslie Fields, (212) 807-1400 x222 

UPSTATE NY MEMBERS ALERT 

The Upstate Media Posse will host the 2nd New 
York State Media Festival on April 12-13 in the 
Shaffer Art Building at Syracuse University. Pam 
Calvert, AIVF's director of programs and ser- 
vices, will be participating as a panelist, and 



would welcome the opportunity to meet with 
upstate members there. The festival is geared 
toward independent producers, media artists, 
educators, activists, students, and all others inter- 
ested in independent media. For more informa- 
tion about the program, call Cheryl Jackson at 
Squeaky Wheel, (716) 884-7172. 

ADVOCACY FORUM 

AIVF is sponsoring an advocacy forum with 
speakers Joanne Chasnow (Associate Director; 
Human Serve/Vote USA), Mona Jimenez 
(Executive Director; Media Alliance) and 
Jamie McCullen (Telecommunications 
Coordinator; Libraries for the Future). They 
will address, among other issues, the 
Telecommunications Bill passed by Congress in 
February and its effect on independents, media 
diversity, access, distribution, emerging technolo- 
gies, arts funding, and arts organizations' voter 
registration efforts. You do not need to be a member 
to attend. R.VS.P appreciated. 

When: Wednesday, April 24, 7 pm 

Where: AIVF office 

Contact: Lisa D. Smith, (212) 807-1400 x 232 

WATCH THIS SPACE ... 

We are planning a program of Summer Intensive 
Workshops, focusing on the hard information you 
need to get your work made. James Schamus; 
Morrie Warshawski; a full day on the in's and 
out's of self-distribution — and more. Watch the 
May Independent for details, or call Leslie Fields at 
x222 for registration information. 

MONTHLY MEMBER SALONS 

This is an opportunity for members to discuss 
work, meet other independents, share war stories, 
and connect with the AIVF community across 
the country. Note: Since our copy deadline is two 
months before the meetings listed below, be sure 
to call the local organizers to confirm that there 
have been no last-minute changes. 

Austin, TX: 

Call for dates and locations. 
Contact: Ben Davis, (512) 708-1962 

Boston, MA: 

Call for dates and locations 

Contact: Susan Walsh (617) 965-8477 

Brooklyn, NY: 

Call for dates and locations 

Contact: Glenn Francis Frontera, (718) 646-7533 

Dallas, TX: 

When: 3rd Wednesday of each month, 7 p.m. 

Where: Call for locations. 

Contact: Bart Weiss, (214) 823-8909 



DO WE HAVE YOUR TAPE? 
READ THIS! 

For many years, AIVF has maintained a 
large archive of videotapes of members' 
work. In the process of moving to our new 
space, we came to the inescapable conclu- 
sion that having this quantity of work in 
our office is not serving its original pur- 
pose. If you sent a tape to us for the 
archive, and would like it back, please call 
Pam Calvert, (212) 807-1400 x 223, to 
arrange its return. If we do not hear from 
you by June 30, we will erase your tape and 
donate it to a non-profit media center for 
stock. 

We have every intention of continu- 
ing to provide information about our 
members' work to programmers, distribu- 
tors, funders, and educators; however, 
storing large numbers of videotapes here in 
our office is not the most effective strategy 
to achieve that end. We are working on a 
long-term project to create a computer 
database of work (both finished and in 
progress) that will be flexible and compre- 
hensive. In time, we anticipate that this 
database will incorporate multimedia ele- 
ments and be made available through the 
Worldwide Web. Stay with us, and we'll 
keep you posted. 



Kansas City, MO: 

Call for dates and locations 

Contact: Rossana Jeran, (816) 363-2249 

Los Angeles, CA: 

When: 1st Wednesday of each month, 7 p.m. 
Where: Swing Cafe, 8543 Santa Monica Blvd. 
Contact: Pat Branch, (310) 289-8612 

Norwalk, CT: 

Call for dates and locations 

Contact: Guy Perrotta (203) 831-8205 , 

Portland, OR: 

Call for dates and locations 

Contact: Grace Lee-Park, (503) 284-5085 

Schenectady, NY: 

When: 1st Wednesday of each month, 6 p.m. 

Where: location tba 

Contact: Mike Camoin, (518) 895-5269 

Special Event Wednesday, April 3: Book- signing and 

presentation by John Pierson, author of Spike, 

Mike, Slackers, and Dykes. Don't miss it! 

Continued on p. 62 



J 



64 THE INDEPENDENT April 1 996 




LEARN 

MAKING 



WOt • DIRECT • SltCOT • EDIT 

YOUR OWN SHORT FILMS IN OUR HANDS-ON EIGHT WEEK 

TOTAL IMMERSION WORKSHOPS FOR INDIVIDUALS 

WITH LITTLE OR NO FILMMAKING EXPERIENCE. 



SPECIAL SIX WEEK INTENSIVE SUMMER WORKSHOPS AT 

PRINCETON & YALE UNIVERSITIES 

& NEW YORK FILM ACADEMY 



LEARN CONCEPTS OF STORY, DIRECTING, CAMERA, 

LIGHTING, SOUND AND EDITING IN AN INTENSIVE 

YET SUPPORTIVE ENVIRONMENT. WORK WITH 16MM 

ARRIFLEX CAMERAS IN SMALL CLASSES DESIGNED AND 

TAUGHT BY AWARD-WINNING INSTRUCTORS. 

NEW WORKSHOPS START FIRST MONDAY OF EVERY MONTH 

IN NEW YORK CITY ALL YEAR ROUND. TUITION $4000. 



CLASSIC ANIMATION 
8 WEEK WORKSHOP 



CEL ANIMATION • PIXILATICN • 
PCTCSCCPING • CLAYMATICN • 

In the New York Film Academy Animation 
Workshop students will animate their work 
on the Oxberry Animation Camera. They 
will also learn concepts of story writing, 
directing, cinematography and editing as they 
apply to animation. Day and evening class 
available. Space is limited. Tuition $2000. 



AVID EDITING 

WORKSHOP 



TWO DAY SUPER INTENSIVE 
NON-LINEAR EDITING WORKSHOP 

Use AVID FILM COMPOSER, the most 
advanced offline AVID editing system. Learn 
to digitize, edit, and output negative 
cut lists, change lists, and optical lists for 
film and EDLs for video. Classes available 
days, evenings, and weekends. Tuition $700. 



new yccr run academy 

IOC EAST 17TH STREET NYC 1CCC3 TEEs 212-674-43CC FAX: 212-477 1414 



April 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 65 



January 1, 1996 



Independents line up for bargain rates 
at DCTV & Electric Film! 




Downtown Community TV Center 
and Electric Film are located at 
87 Lafayette Street, New York, NY 10013 
fax (212)219-0248 



New York- 
DCTV's free classes 
and low cost equip- 
ment access have 
been attracting huge 
crowds to the histor- 
ic firehouse on 
Lafayette Street. 

When DCTV 

announced almost 
free Avid instruction 
& editing,commun- 
ity producers packed 
the sidewalk trying 
to get into the newly 
renovated building. 

Despite warnings 
from the police, 
Electric Film has 
simultaneously 
opened newly in- 
stalled Avid off-line 
and on-line editing 
suites with res 27 & 
amazing 3D-DVE. 
Interf ormat suite 
and inexpensive 
Betacam packages 
already make crowd 
control a daily prob- 
lem. People can 
call DCTV at 
1-800- VTOEONY 
or (212)966-4510 
& Electric Film at 
1-800-TAPELESS 
or (212)925-3429. 



$3.75 us $5.00 can 



MAY 1996 



A 



0^ 




endent 




monthly 



t 




o "74470"801H I 6 



05 



Smells Like 
Screen Spirit 

How to Write a No-Budget Film 



m ^ 



Collective 
Wisdom 

A Distribution Co-op turns 25 



FIVF 



9 



requirement of satisfying stills and templing film clips. Wifh over 14,000 hours 

of foofage and 20,00t),000 historical photos, we've got all fhe ingredients for your next film 

or multimedia projecf. Cataloged, copyrighf-cleared and ready for you to use. Many images are 

already available in digifal format So give us a call and lef's gef cookin'I 



!"<*! 



*<di 



fi 






s' 









x{m 












Fax us on your letterhead for 

a free brochure and sample reel. 

And check ouf our on-line databases 

on Foofage.nef and on CompuServe. 



Your One Call To History: 

800-4G6-Q115 









W 



JSn 



K 



JSMm L 

53Q W. 25th Street, New York, NY 1DD1 1 Tel. (212) 62Q-3955 Fax (212) 645-21 37 



( For) twelve years. Visions of U.S. has 

THE TWELFTH ANNUAL VISIONS OF U.S. VIDEO CONTEST 

discovered a wealth of new creative talent in 
the premiere video contest of our time. This 
year it's your turn to create an original video 
production and have your work judged by f Q Q 



video professionals - with the chance to win 
valuable Sony prizes. The contest, sponsored 
by Sony and administered by the American 
Film Institute, is an invitation to express 
your vision - on 8mm, Hi8, Digital 
Video (DV), VHS, S-VHS, VHS-C, or Beta home 
video. Just choose a category- fiction, non- 
fiction, music video, experimental or young 
people -and start shooting. Submit your 
work by June 15, 1996 and a distinguished 
panel of judges including Tim Allen, Francis 
Ford Coppola, Kathleen Kennedy, Penelope 
Spheeris, Scott Wolf, Lisa Ann Walter, Esai 
Morales, Keenan Ivory Wayans, Jonathan 
Brandis and Steve Oedekerk will begin the 
judging process. You'll be in competition for 
an exciting selection of Sony video products, 
and everyone who enters will receive a bonus 
blank videocassette. To find out more, call 
(213) 856-7749. Or write Visions of U.S., 
P.O. Box 200, Hollywood, California 90078. 




tries 



9i#e@^ A ai$ 



© 1996 Sony Electronics Inc. All rights reserved. 
Reproduction in whole or In part without written 
permission is prohibited. Sony is a trademark of Sony. 



AFI 

American Film Institute 




SONY 



Sponsored by Sony Electronics Inc. 




The 1 Bth 

Independent Feature Film market 

September 15-22, 1996 

Angelika Film Center, New York City 



Don't miss the only market devoted to 

emerging American independent filmmaking talent. 



For sponsorship information 
or submission application contact: 
Independent Feature Project 
104 West 29th Street, 12th Floor 
New York, NY 10001-5310 
212.465.8200 fax 212.465.8525 



Filmmaker submission deadlines: 
First deadline: May 31 , 1996 
Second deadline: June 21, 1996 
Applicants submitting by 
the first deadline receive a $50 
discount on registration fee. 



JVOVL 




FINALLY, 

FILM EDITING PRODUCTS 
THAT DO EVERYTHING 
YOU'D EXPECT. 
AT PRICES YOU DON'T EXPECT. 

D-Vision® Pro, the intuitive, easy to use non-linear editor, 
with thousands of users worldwide is known for 
full-featured editing and affordable pricing. Pro includes: 
Flex and Evertz edge code reading, negative cut list out- 
put, up to 100 hours of storage, perfect audio sync of 6 
independent audio channels... And is upgradeable to 
D- Vision's revolutionary new D-Vision FilmCUT™. Buy 
Pro now to ease your way into digital non-linear editing 
and take advantage of aggressive upgrade pricing toward 
the new D-Vision software products. 



D-Vision Systems, Inc. 



nuking Uigilai \h din H ■ 



(all for details. 

•80O8DVISI0N (838-4746) 
Or Outside the U.S.:+ 1 -3 1 2-7 1 4-1 400 

Or fax +1-312-714-1400 

For the Professional Partner Neorest You. 



1995 D-Vuion v.i. m -. Im D-\ I WJNE 

■nd Making Digital Media Worit fo I 



the • 



independent 




AMY 1 996 

VOLUME 19, NUMBER 4 

Publisher: Ruby Lerner 

Editor in Chief: Patricia Thomson 

Managing Editor: Dana Harris 

Editorial Assistant: Adam Knee 

Intern: Tomio Geron 

Contributing Editors: Kathryn Bowser, Luke Hones, 

Barbara Bliss Osborn, Robert L. Seigel, Esq. 

Art Director: Daniel Christmas 

Advertising: Laura D. Davis (212) 807-1400 x225 

National Distribution: Total Circulation (Manhattan) 

(201) 342-6334; Fine Print (800) 874-7082; Ingram 

Periodicals (800) 627-6247 

Printed in the USA by Lancaster Press 

Send address changes to: The Independent Film & 

Video Monthly, 304 Hudson St., 6th fl., NY, NY 10013. 

The Independent Film & Video Monthly (ISSN 0731- 
5198) is published monthly except February and 
September by the Foundation for Independent Video 
and Film (FIVF), a nonprofit, tax-exempt educational 
foundation dedicated to the promotion of video and film. 
Subscription to the magazine ($45/yr individual; $25/yr 
student; $75/yr library; $100/yr nonprofit organization; 
$150/yr business/industry) is included in annual mem- 
bership dues paid to the Association of Independent 
Video and Filmmakers (AIVF), the national trade associ- 
ation of individuals involved in independent film and 
video, 304 Hudson St., NY, NY 10013, (212) 807- 
1400; fax: (212) 463-8519; aivffivf® aol.com; http:// 
www.virtualfilm.com/AIVF/ Second Class Postage Paid 
at New York, NY, and at additional mailing offices. 
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Indepen- 
dent Film & Video Monthly, 304 Hudson St., 6th fl., NY, 
NY 10013. 

Publication of The Independent is made possible in 
part with public funds from the New York State Council 
on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts, a 
federal agency. 

Publication of any advertisement in The Independent 
does not constitute an endorsement. AIVF/FIVF are not 
responsible for any claims made in an ad. 

Letters to The Independent should be addressed to 
the editor. Letters may be edited for length. 

All contents are copyright of the Foundation for 
Independent Video and Film, Inc. Reprints require writ- 
ten permission and acknowledgement of the article's 
previous appearance in The Independent. The 
Independent is indexed in the Alternative Press Index. 

© Foundation for Independent Video & Film, Inc. 1996 

AIVF/FIVF staff: Ruby Lerner, executive director; Ellen 
Barker, resource/development director; Cleo Cacoulidis, 
advocacy coordinator; Pamela Calvert, director of pro- 
grams and services; Leslie Fields, membership coordi- 
nator; Judah Friedlander, membership associate; 
Johnny McNair, information services coordinator; Leslie 
Singer, director of administration; Lisa Deanne Smith, 
resource/development associate. 

AIVF/FIVF legal counsel: Robert L. Freedman, Esq., 
Leavy, Rosensweig & Hyman 

AIVF/FIVF Board of Directors: Carroll Parrott Blue, 
Melissa Burch, Loni Ding, Barbara Hammer, Ruby 
Lerner (ex officio), James Klein, Diane Markrow, Robb 
Moss, Robert Richter, James Schamus*, Norman 
Wang*, Barton Weiss, Debra Zimmerman, Susan 
Wittenberg. * FIVF Board of Directors only 

4 THE INDEPENDENT May 1996 



Features 

30 Cheap Tricks: How to Write a No-Budget Film 



by Robert Dardon 

As any line producer knows, "no-budget" films come from "no-budget" scripts. Here 

are a few tips to bear in mind before you set out to write the next Brothers McMullen. 




34 



A Bright New Day: Why a 25-year-old Distribution Co-op Could 
be the Wave of the Future 

by Arlene Goldbard & Don Adams 

As niche distributors are becoming an endangered species, increasingly mediamakers 
are looking for alternative routes to audiences, from self- distribution to cooperative 
ventures. One of the most instructive models is New Day Films, the distribution 
co-op which, at age 25, has had time to learn the ropes. 




8 Media News 

Out of Sight: Nervous Nellies in 
North Carolina Reject Gay Fest 

by Andrea Cooper 

AIDS Video Vetoed 

by Cynthia Chris 

ITVS Partnership Lures Station Dollars 

by Scott Briggs 

Latino Archive Launched in L.A. 

by Michael Cho 



15 Talking Heads 

Raoul Peck, director: The Man by the Shore 

by Yosha Goldstein 



Joshua Seftel, documentarian: Taking On the Kennedys 

by Nan Levinson 








Nodi Murphy and Jack Lewis, festival codirectors: 
Outstanding South African Gay and Lesbian Film Festival 



by Catherine Saalfield 



20 Field Reports 



The Sum Total at Sundance 

by Dana Harris 

Der Supermarkt: The Berlin 
International Film Festival 

by Pa i Rl< i a Thomson 

The Cine Club Circuit in 
Eastern Europe 

B> Cathy Mm s 



COVER: Four Corners of Nowhere producer/actor Julian Rad 
blows off steam on set in Ann Arbor, where director Steve 
Chobsky managed to get by without paying for most locations 
because of their ties in the community. In this issue. Robert 
Dardon looks at other tips and tricks for writing and line-pro- 
ducing no-budget films. Photo: Mark Day 
LEFT: The Brothers McMullen cast (top) and a recent shot of 
the New Day co-op. 

ABOVE: A scene from Sundance crowd-pleaser Walking and 
Talking. 



with Will Parrinello 

BY TOMIO GERON 

42 Festivals 

by Kathryn Bowser 

52 Classifieds 
56 Notices 
64 Memoranda 

BY PAMEI \ Ca] 



May 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 5 




* Is Proud ^ 

To Have Provided 
Laboratory Services 
* For The 



1996 SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL WINNERS 



"WELCOME TO THE DOLLHOUSE" 

by Todd Solondz 

GRAND JURY PRIZE FOR BEST DRAMATIC FILM 



* "TROUBLESOME CREEK: A MIDWESTERN" 

by Jeanne Jordan & Steven Ascher 

* GRAND JURY PRIZE FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY FILM 

AUDIENCE AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY FILM 



"CARE OF THE SPITFIRE GRILL" 

by Lee David Zlotoff 

AUDIENCE AWARD FOR BEST DRAMATIC FILM 



• • 



* "GIRLS TOWN" 

by Jim McKay 

THE FILMMAKERS TROPHY: DRAMATIC DIVISION 
SPECIAL RECOGNITION FOR COLLABORATION 



"CUTTING LOOSE" 

by Susan Todd & Andrew Young 

THE FILMMAKERS TROPHY: DOCUMENTARY DIVISION 
CINEMATOGRAPHY AWARD: DOCUMENTARY DIVISION 



"BIG NIGHT" 

* by Stanley Tucci & Campbell Scott 

THE WALDO SALT SCREENWRITING AWARD 



DuArt Film and Video 

245 WEST 55TH STREET NEW YORK, NY 10019 212-757-4580 OR 1-800-52-DUART 



"In making Picture Bride, 
we turned many times to 
AIVF/FIVF publications for 
the facts on fundraising, 
production and distribution. 
Their books are up-to-date, 
well organized and accessible. 
Best of all, it's getting the 41 1 
without the schmooze!" 
Kayo Hatta — 
"Picture Bride", winner of 
The Audience Award, 
Sundance Film Festival, 1995 

"The new AIVF/FIVF books 
are a great one-stop course in 
independent film distribution. 
Keep your film's release story 
from being one of hex, lies & 
videotape — or living in 
oblivion." 

Whit Stillman — "Barcelona" 
& "Metropolitan" 



CALL NOW 
[212] 807-1400 

Orwrite:AIVF/FIVF 

304 HUDSON STREET, 6th Fl, 

NEW YORK, NY 10013 

Shipping and handling: 

Domestic - $3.50 for the 

first book, $ 1 .00 for each 

additional book. 

Foreign - $5.00 for the first 

book, $1.50 for each 

additional book. 

VISA and Mastercard 

Accepted 



OF 3 GREAT RESOURCE 
BOOKS FROM AIVF/FIVF 

ORDER TODAY - SUPPLIES ARE LIMITED ! 



AIVF/FIVF GUIDE TO INTERNATIONAL FILM & VIDEO FESTIVALS 

edited by Kathryn Bowser 

$34.95/$29.95 AIVF members. Plus shipping and handling. 

The 4th edition of FIVF's best seller is a completely indexed and easy-to-read 

compendium of over 400 international film and video festivals, with contact 

information, entry regulations, dates and deadlines, categories, accepted formats, 

and much more. The festival guide includes information on all types of festivals: 

small and large, specialized and general, domestic and foreign. 



AIVF/FIVF GUIDE TO FILM & VIDEO DISTRIBUTORS 

edited by Kathryn Bowser 

$24.95/$ 1 9.95 AIVF members. Plus shipping and handling. 

A must-read for independent film and video makers searching for the right 

distributor.The distributors' guide presents handy profiles of 1 50 commercial and 

nonprofit distributors, practical information and company statistics on the type of 

work handled, primary markets, relations with producers, marketing and 

promotion, foreign distribution and contacts. Fully indexed. This is the best 

compendium of distribution information especially tailored for independent 

producers available. 



THE NEXT STEP: DISTRIBUTING INDEPENDENT FILMS AND VIDEOS 

edited by Morrie Warshawski 

$24.95/$ 1 9.95 AIVF members. Plus shipping and handling. 
Leading professionals in the field answer frequently asked questions on 
distribution. Learn more about finding a distributor from Debra Zimmerman 
(Women Make Movies), self-distribution from Joe Berlinger (producer/director 
of Brother's Keeper), foreign distribution from Nancy Walzog (Tapestry 
International) and theatrical distribution from David Rosen (author of Off 
Hollywood). Plus find out about promotion; public broadcasting, cable and home 
video markets; non-theatrical distribution; contracts and much, much more. 
A bibliography provides additional readings on selected topics. This is a prime 
source of practical insights into the whole distribution process. 



SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL 

SAVE OVER 25% — ORDER ALL THREE BOOKS AND PAY ONLY $59.95 Plus shipping and handling. 
Join now as an AIVF member at the DISCOUNTED rate of $40.00 for I year! 

Both of these SPECIALS expire April 30, 1996 






Carolina Reject Gay Fest 



The North Carolina Arts 
Council has taken the unusual 
step of endorsing, then deny- 
ing, a grant proposal from the 
Charlotte Gay and Lesbian 
Film Series to screen the work 
of two well-known indepen- 
dent filmmakers, apparently 
out of fear that the grant 
would anger legislators and 
cause a reduction in the coun- 
cil's funding. 

The organizers of the six- 
year-old film series applied for 
the grant to bring New York- 
based filmmakers Todd Haynes 
(Poison, Safe) and Su Friedrich 
(Sink or Swim, Rules of the 
Road) to Charlotte to present 
and talk about their work. "It's 
very clear to us the reason the 
arts council ditched it was 
because they didn't want to 
sacrifice state funding for a 
$1,500 grant," says film series 
board member Robert West, 
who also serves as curator of 
film for the Mint Museum of Art in Charlotte. 
"This is an explicit case of state arts funding being 
withheld because of the name of an organization 
rather than on artistic merit." 

However, Mary Regan, executive director of 
the arts council, insists, "We've never funded 
organizations based solely on artistic excellence." 
She says the agency, which gives more than $4-5 
million annually to approximately 1,400 appli- 
cants, "looks for a track record of strong, effective 
programming, a broad-based board, sound finan- 
cial practices, and projects that fit with other 
things going on in the community." She adds, 
"We're looking at the long-range development of 
all the arts in the state. You can't consider just 
artistic excellence and get very far as a public arts 
agency." 

The controversy centers around a meeting last 
May in which the council's Visual Arts panel 
reviewed 75 applications, including the film 
series' request for $3,000. The minutes from that 




meeting (which quote anonymous panelists) 
reveal that what started out as an enthusiastic 
response to the proposal turned into a heated 
debate. Panelists initially agreed that the quality 
of Friedrich' s and Haynes 's work was high and the 
organization requesting funds was sound. The 
application received a rating of 2.5 on a scale of 
3.0 and was recommended for a $1,500 grant. 

However, the next day some panelists, perhaps 
fearful of the specter of U. S. Senator Jesse Helms 
and his allies in the North Carolina legislature, 
reopened the discussion. One panelist called the 
film series, even though tax exempt and by law 
non-political, a "proselytizing effort." Another 
countered that the series' artistic vision is simply 
"to reflect gay life," adding, "This is a very homo- 
phobic conversation." Talk quickly turned to how 
going ahead with the grant might hurt the coun- 
cil. One participant asked, "Should we act out of 
political fear? Where do we draw the line?" An 
arts council staffer shot back, "Sometimes you 



change some of the things that you do to keep 
doing the things you want to do. A $1,500 grant 
can have terrible repercussions." The sentiment 
was echoed more bluntly by a panelist who 
insisted, "The council is extremely vulnerable in 
the legislature. This grant will be picked up. 
The publicity could harm our entire funding." 

The panel then revoted and this time the 
proposal received a 1.875 rating — too low for 
funding. An African American panelist who 
had supported the grant commented that she 
was glad the council was "not discussing black 
funding 30 years ago, that there were some peo- 
ple willing to . . . not back down in order that 
[she] could be here today." 

Later, several panelists called council staff 
expressing concern that the second vote was 
based on criteria outside the visual arts applica- 
tion guidelines. Regan denies the panel ignored 
its own rules: "The board is supposed to make 
the decisions that will best aid the arts in all the 



8 THE INDEPENDENT May 1996 



"It's very clear to us the reason the 

arts council ditched it was because 

they didn't want to sacrifice state 

funding for a $1,500 grant," says 

Robert West, board member of the 

Charlotte Gay & Lesbian Film Festival. 



state. That's 
an overarch- 
ing responsi- 
bility. You 
have to 

make the 
best decision 
you can and 
go with it." 

The film series board felt particularly angry 
after reading the council's recently adopted 
1995-97 plan. Among the plan's goals: "To sup- 
port arts programs that reflect and sustain the 
diverse cultural identities of the people of North 
Carolina" and "to promote a climate of inclu- 
sion, mutual understanding, and support among 
the diverse cultural groups which represent the 
state's arts community." "How was their deci- 
sion culturally inclusive?" asks board member 
Tom Warshauer. "Maybe their plan should have 
said, 'We'd like to include everyone but gays 
and lesbians in our funding.'" 

Filmmaker Su Friedrich found the panel's 
actions deplorable: "When people cave in like 
this it contributes to shallow thinking across the 
board. It's not even as though my work is this 
outrageous stuff with explicit sexual imagery. It 
seems to me that the decision wasn't about our 
work but about the fact that it was a gay and les- 
bian organization asking for money." Film series 
board member Elise Fullmer agrees: "Sometimes 
when people say they're doing something for 
the higher good, it's just an excuse for not doing 
the right thing. If the African American com- 
munity had submitted a grant to them, would 
they have turned it down based on the name of 
the organization?" 

One thing is sure: the issue of state-funded 
arts by gay men and lesbians won't go away in 
North Carolina. While plans to bring Friedrich 
and Haynes down to Charlotte remain on the 
hack burner, the film series has submitted a new 
grant proposal to the council, this time to fund 
a program of gay and lesbian shorts, to he ciliat- 
ed by producer Christine Vachon. Robert West 
remains hopeful that the council will give them 
another shot hut he says, "It this one gets reject- 
ed, we're not going to keep banging our heads 
against a brick wall indefinitely." 

Anuria Coooper 

Andrea Cooper writes frequently for The New York 
limes Book Review and other publications, 



AIDS Video Vetoed 

Peer Education, Not Fear Education, .1 video that 
promotes "reality-based" HIV/AIDS education 
in public schools, was designed to combat tear. 
However, the video seems to have generated 
fears at the New York State AIDS Institute. 



which decided 
not to show the 
tape at its annu- 
al conference in 
Albany last 
January 28-29. 
The video, pro- 
duced by Tom 
Beer and Ionnis Mookas and directed by Mookas, 
was one of only three submitted for screening at 
the conference, which draws some 1,700 health 
care providers, representatives of community 
based organizations, and advocates for people liv- 
ing with HIV/AIDS. But in a move apparently cal- 
culated to sidestep controversy, the committee 
that reviewed the tapes opted to show the other 
two, Risk Reduction for the Deaf and Hard of 
Hearing and Dyke TV's Lesbians and AIDS, and 
reject Peer Education, Not Fear Education, the only 
tape specifically focused on education for teens. 

According to Beer, his initial contact with the 
AIDS Institute conference programmer Hope 
Goldhaber had been promising; she even suggest- 
ed he attend the conference to field questions 






Abs(tin)ence of Malice? The New York State AIDS Institute 
found Peer Education. Not Fear Education too political. 
Courtesy DIVA TV 



from viewers. Just days before the event, however, 
Beer received word that there was "no way" Peer 
Education could be shown at the state -sponsored 
conference; the review committee, he was told, 
had found it too political. 

Frances Tarlton, spokesperson for the New 
York State Office of Public Health, which sponsors 
the event, says the reason for the rejection is that 
the videos were shown continuously in a room 
designed for "drop in" rather than "sit down" view- 
ers, and the review committee was afraid most 
people would see only a few minutes of Beer and 
Mookas's half-hour tape before moving on. 
According to Tarlton, the committee expressed 
concern that sections taken out of context might 
give the impression the tape entirely dismisses 
abstinence as a possible choice for teens: "Seeing 
snippets of it instead of the piece in its entirety 
could give people the wrong idea." 

But Beer thinks that the underlying issue is 
that the state government, becoming increasingly 
conservative under Governor George Pataki's 
Republican administration, is eager to avoid 
offending right-wing interests over the potentially 
explosive topic of HIV/AIDS education in public 
schools. While the hulk of Peer Education, Not Fear 
Educatkm is taken up by a series of interviews with 
experts in the field and peer educators — a diverse 
group of teens, some of whom advocate teaching 
abstinence as well as safer sex — the video also cri- 
tiques the "fear-based" and abstinence-only AIDS 
education endorsed by the religious right. Peer 
Education excerpts a video called No Second 
Chance, produced by Jeremiah Films (whose Gay 
Rights /Special Rights drew protests from gay 
activists); in one scene a teenage boy asks the 
adult lecturer, "What if I want to have sex before 
I get married?" She replies, "Well, I guess you'll 
just have to be prepared to die." 

Peer Education, Not Fear Education was original- 
ly produced for AIDS Community Television, a 
weekly cable series in New York, and has already 
been widely screened without incident by, among 
others, the AIDS and Adolescents Network of 
New York; the American School Health 
Association conference in Kent, Ohio; the Metro 
Teen AIDS conference m Washington, D.C.; the 
Wisconsin Stale AIDS Program conference in 
Madison; and, via Free Speech TV, on public 
access cable television in as main as 4^ cities. But 
it remains unclear how New York's youth will fere 
it ediK.ilion.il materials such as Peer Education, 
Xi>i Fear Education continue to be passed over by 
state officials tiptoeing around potentially contro- 
versial and potentially lifesaving information. 

mi \ Chris 

( '.ynthia c l/iris is ,1 frequent contributot t" Afterimage 

and has written extensively ">i Ml >\ activist media 1 1 1 

writing has also been seen m Felix, exposure, I ligh 

l\ rr irmam e, and V I brm. 



May 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 9 



>rom the international success of 
— "Clerks" at Cannes, through the 
dominating presence at student 
film festivals throughout North 
America, through worldwide industry 
acceptance of graduate students, 
Vancouver Film School positions stu- 
dents for success. 

With the spectacular growth of the BC 
Film Industry over the past decade 
and predictions for even more growth 
to the end of the century, shouldn't 
you do the same? 



. Call Vancouver Film School TODAY , 
Position YOURSELF for success. 



VFS OFFERS PORTFOLIO PRODUCTION 

PROGRAMS IN: 

Film 

Classical Animation 

Acting for Film & Television 

Multimedia Production 

3D Computer Animation 

Certified Alias/Wavefront 

Certified Avid 
ertified Digidesign/ProTools 

Call. 

Compare. 

Nothing does. 

Call: 1-800-661-4101 



Web: http://www.multimedia.edu] 
[E-mail: query13@multimedia.edu] 



ANCOUVER FILM SCHOOL 
#400 - 1 168 Hamilton Street, Vancouver, 
B.C. Canada V6B 2S2 



ITVS 
Partnership 
Lures Station 

Dollars 




Independents, choose your 
partners. A new funding program 
is supporting teamwork between 
independent media artists and their 
local public television stations. 

The Independent Television Service 
(ITVS) in St. Paul, Minneapolis, recent- 
ly inaugurated a Partnership Production 
fund, created in cooperation with the 
nation's public television network distribu- 
tors: Central Educational gg 
Network 
Eastern 
Educational 
Television 
Network, 
Pacific 
Mountain 
Network, 
and South- 
ern Educa- 
t i o n a 1 
C o m m u n - 
ications Net- 
work. Each 
of the four 
regional orga- 
nizations will distribute $200,000 of ITVS funds, 
in allocations of $10,000 to $50,000, for program 
proposals presented by partnerships of an inde- 
pendent producer and a local public television sta- 
tion. Participating stations must match the grant 
amount with financing or production services. 

The new fund aims to encourage work that 
expresses local and regional views on issues often 
left out of the national spotlight. Proposed pro- 
grams must tell stories that address a specific com- 
munity's changes, challenges, and dynamics in 
ways that will generate interest among a wider 
population, a technique ITVS calls "civic journal- 
ism." 

"A lot of times, in the rush to create program- 
ming that has absolute universal appeal or univer- 
sal marketability, the local and regional views get 
lost in the shuffle," says ITVS outreach writer and 
editor Barry Madore. "It's valuable for those voic- 
es and opinions to be heard. Issues affect different 
communities in different ways. This will hopefully 
get people engaged in dialogue about the issues 
and stories presented in these programs. It's 
broadening the discourse, and that will impact 
how issues are looked at and how policy is decid- 
ed in the country." 

Applications were due in March, and ITVS 



expects to announce 
the recipients this sum- 
mer. A second applica- 
tion round may eventual- 
ly be announced, and ITVS 
will evaluate the program to 
determine whether or not to 
continue it in 1997. 
The program will fund docu- 
mentary, public affairs, or dra- 
matic proposals. The acceptable 
styles of collaboration between pro- 
ducers and stations are equally var- 
ied — as long as the proposals are initi- 
ated and designed by the partners them- 
selves. 

In a December letter introducing the fund, 
ITVS executive director James Yee 
noted that the organization 
would not act as a "mar- 
riage broker" between 
interested participants. 
Madore explains further, 
"In some cases, it could 
be a situation where the 
independent comes in 
with the idea and is the 
creative juice behind the 
project, and the station 
provides the technical assis- 
tance necessary. In another 
instance, it could be more of 
a shared, back and forth 
relationship. We're really looking 
for independents and stations to find that bal- 
ance." 

One other aspect of the funded partnerships 
will remain constant: Editorial control over 
resulting productions will rest with the inde- 
pendent producers. 

That doesn't mean, however, that participat- 
ing stations don't have a role in the creative 
end of the partnership. The fund is designed to 
put material on the air that neither partner 
could have otherwise completed. "We're look- 
ing to provide an opportunity for both indepen- 
dents and stations to create the kind of work 
that they would like to create, but often don't 
get a chance to," says Madore. 

ITVS was formed by the Telecommun- 
ications Act of 1988 to foster increased diversi- 
ty in national public television programming. 
Funded by the Corporation for Public Broad- 
casting, the organization has provided produc- 
tion money, distribution and promotional sup- 
port to independent producers for nearly 100 
single programs and a dozen limited series 
broadcast throughout the country. This year, 
ITVS ended its long-standing "open call" 
process, a general funding mechanism that 



10 THE INDEPENDENT May 1996 





M 


[71 


G 


N 


u 


LAB-LINK 


Complete 
Film 
Video 

Motion Picture 
Laboratory 

Lab-Link, Inc. 

115 West 45th Street, NYC 10036 

212.302.7373 Fax 719.1867 


35mm, Super 16 & 16mm Color and B&W Oailies 
Video and Sound Oailies 
35mm & 16mm Color Reversal 
16mm B&W Reversal - 16mm & 35mm Hi-Con 
Answer & Release Prints, Spots, Trailers & Features 
Intermediates - Fine Grains - Masters - IP's & IN's 
Dupe Work Prints - 35mm & 16mm - Color and B&W 
Liquid Gate Printing and Computerized Timing 



Judge Us By the 

Collections 

"We Keep 




Smithsonian 
Institution 

Jhe film collection 
from the great cultural 
institution's Office of 
Jelecommunicotions. 



PANTHKRA 
•roducotons 

400 hours of film 
from this Emmy 
award winning 
production company. 




Hearst 
Historical 

One of the premier 
historical collections 
dating back to the 
turn of the century. 



Pan Aim 
Collection 

I Jrovelogues, industrials, 
■ commercials, and 

aviation history from 

I928-I980. 




Nsw York • Paris • Tokyo 
Barcuona • Tsi Aviv 
Hong Kong • Stockholm 
Sioui • Stuttgart • Osaka 



< ' C> <> I „ C ' 1 T T S 



500 

Nations 

Incredible scenic 
beauty from the epic 
CBS miniseries hosted 
by Kevin Costner. 



Wi-;s< AM 

Incredible perspectives 
from the manufacturer 
of the wodd's most 
advanced comero mount. 



(oil ioi free Demo: 
raw (2 12)*!)!M)1(M) 
xx: (212) 799-9258 



THE WORLD'S GREATEST LIBRARY FOR CONTEMPORARY & ARCHIVAL STOCK FOOTAGE 



THERE'S II WIN 



FOI THOSE WHO 



WANT TO PHRSHE A 



CAREER IR FILM... 




Nashville's abundance of music videos, features, and documentaries 
make it a booming film center. So it's only natural that a top notch film school 
be added to the mix. Watkins Film School offers degree and professional 
certificate programs in producing, directing, screenwriting, cinematography, 
and editing. It's a hands-on education right from the start with an award- 
■m^Hl^m^BnaimiB winning faculty and industry internships. 

Want more? How about an advisory 
board made up of the likes of Bruce 
Beresford, director (Driving Miss Daisy}, 
Steven Haft, producer (Dead Poets Society), 
and Joan Tewkesbury, screenwriter 
(Nashville} and director. 

And, if your aspirations are high, but your 
finances aren't, you'll appreciate Watkins 
affordable education and financial aid 
availability. Call now for information. Then 
head south and make a major production 
out of your life. 




1-800-288-1420 

601 CHURCH ST,. NASHVILLE TN 37219 



[ 



WATKINS FILM SCHOOL IS PART OF THE WATKINS INSTITUTE COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN. 
WATKINS IS ONE OF THE NATION'S OLDEST NON-PROFIT CONTINUING EDUCATION CENTERS. 






operated with annual application deadlines. The 
organization will now accept grant requests for 
single programs and limited series year-round. 

For information on the Partnership Production 
fund or other ITVS offerings, contact the organi- 
zation at (612) 225-9035 or itvs@itvs.org. 

Scott Briggs 

Scott Briggs is a videomaker and a writer about art and 
culture in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area. 



Latino Archive 
Launched in LA. 

"We as a minority com- 
munity have not been in 
a situation of being able 
to preserve our history," 
says Jose Luis Ruiz, exec- 
utive director of the 
National Latino Com- 
munications Center 
(NLCC) in Los Angeles. 
Preoccupied with basic 
issues of access and repre- 
sentation in the media 
today, few in the Latino 
community have previ- 
ously thought of preserv- 
ing the legacy of their 
past gains and triumphs 
in film and television. 
Meanwhile, for each film 
or video lost over time, a 
bit of the rich Latino his- 
tory and culture in the United States also disap- 
pears. 

But now the NLCC wants to change that with 
an ambitious plan to open the National Latino 
Film and Video Archive. As one of five minority 
consortium members affiliated with the Corpor- 
ation for Public Broadcasting, the center has 
worked for over 20 years to produce and promote 
programs by and about Latinos for public televi- 
sion. By starting an archive, it expands its mission 
and begins serving as a central clearinghouse for 
Latino film and video. 

Back in 1991, one phone call put the NLCC 
into the archive business. KCET, Los Angeles's 
public TV station, contacted Ruiz to see if he 
wanted to take over the hundreds of hours of pro- 
grams that the NLCC, known as the Latino 
Consortium and then based at KCET, had origi- 
nally created for public television from 1975 to the 
mid-1980s, primarily through two series — Vistas 
and iPresente! Prohibitive storage costs had forced 
KCET to choose between finding someone else to 
look after the material and recycling the film 
stock. 

Understanding its importance, Ruiz assumed 
responsibility for the collection. Overnight, the 




12 THE INDEPENDENT May 1996 



NLCC became a repository for archival materi- 
als. But, like KCET, the center had to face the 
problem of how and where to store all the pro- 
grams. Luckily, grants from the Arco Foun- 
dation and CBS, $5,000 and $12,000 respec- 
tively, enabled the NLCC to find a temporary 
home for the materials and to begin investigat- 
ing the feasibility of a full-fledged archive. 

The center's greatest hurdle — and primary 
focus — right now is preserving the more than 
3,000 films, videotapes, and audiotapes already 
in its possession. With 2,300 videos on seven 
different formats, it faces the reality of video's 




A new Latino archive will preserve film and video 
footage, like this scene from iChicano! History of the 
Mexican American Civil Rights Movement. 

Photo: George Rodriguez 

limited 20-year shelf life. For the job of preser- 
vation, the NLCC contacted the Bay Area 
Video Coalition (BAVC). BAVC has drawn up 
plans to remaster onto digital Betacam all the 
1/2" open reel-to-reel, Betamax, and Betacam 
and some of the 3/4" tapes — 450 tapes in all. It's 
a costly process — around $100,000 — and does- 
n't include the video, film, and audio transfers 
still left to do. 

In addition to the tapes from KCET, the cen- 
ter has also acquired valuable archival material 
H i ime upon while producing a tour-part public 
television series, iChicano! History of the 
Mexican American ( Hvi Rights Movement, broad- 
cast nationally this past April and coproduced 
with Galan Productions. "It was really challeng- 
ing to find footage to cover the time period tor 
the series [1965-1975]," says producer Siis.m 
Radio. "So few >>t these events were covered by 
the mainstream media at the time." Over- 
shadowed by television news coverage of the 
African American end rights struggle, the 



Chicano movement was often not seen as a 
national story. And even when protests and 
marches were covered, most local news stations — 
faced with prohibitive storage costs and the 
expense of hiring an archivist — recycled the film 
stock rather than preserving it. 

Fortunately, KMEX, a Spanish-language sta- 
tion in L.A., covered many of the key events and 
personalities from the Chicano movement. The 
NLCC discovered that 56 boxes of 16mm film and 
audiotapes from the KMEX news collection, cov- 
ering the same period as the series, had been 
donated to the University of Southern California, 
where they sat untouched in a warehouse 
for four years. The footage filled in crucial 
gaps and provided a perspective not found 
in the limited English-language news cov- 
erage of many events — including the 1968 
East L.A. Walkouts, where student pro- 
tests were met with police abuse, as well as 
the death of Ruben Salazar, news director 
at KMEX and a former Los Angeles Times 
reporter, who was killed by police in 1970 
under controversial circumstances. After 
negotiating with USC, Ruiz was able to 
transfer the material to the NLCC. 

For now, monetary constraints and a 
lack of viewing facilities prevent the 
NLCC from opening the archive to the 
public. But by the year 2000, NLCC would 
like to see the archive grow into a research 
center, as well as a distributor of Latino 
films and videos, hooked into the Internet 
and outputting onto CD-ROM, in addi- 
tion to traditional formats, like VHS. 
Some of the archive's materials would also be used 
in programming for the Latino Channel for 
Learning, a bilingual public television service cur- 
rently in the works. Funding remains a major 
obstacle, as well as' negotiating agreements with 
copyright owners. But the stakes are high. Says 
NLCC director of programming, Marissa Leal, "I 
really feel that there's going to be a whole erasing 
of culture and independent expression il we don't 
preserve these entities." 

NLCC, 3171 Los Feliz Blvd., Ste 200, L.A., CA 
90039; (213) 663-8294; fax: (213) 663-5606. 

Michael Cho 

Michael ( 'ho has just completed Another America, a 

dot umentary that takes a personal perspet rive on 

Korean Americans and African Americans in the inner 

cities <>l Detroit and Ij>s Angeles. 

Errata 

In the March issue, Providence Mayor Buddy 
Cianci's name was misspelled in the article 
"The Campaign Game." Also m that issue, 
Ken Winokur, the photographer of Richard 
Leacock/Valerie Lalonde portrait on p. 26 was 
misidentified. We regret the errors. 



AmtRicAN 

(TlOKTAGE 
iKC. 



AVID 



.*< 



900 



AVID 900 NOW AVAILABLE 

FILM & VIDEO PRODUCTION 

POST-PRODUCTION SPECIALISTS 

Hi8 TO BETACAM TIMECODED DUBS 

BETACAM SP PACKAGES from $300 



lOTH YEAR ANNIVERSARY 



voice 334-8283 334-8345 fax 
375 West B'way 3R. NY. NY 1 001 2 




The Evolution of Camera Stabilization has just taken 
"One Giant Leap" forward The Glidecam Dual-G is the 
first Dual-Gimbaled. Dual-Handled. Counterbalanced 
Camera Stabilization System designed to distribute the 
weight of the system between two operators The Dual-G 
stabilizes cameras weighing from 8 to 22 pounds, and 
frees the camera in ways only previously accomplished 
with systems costing ten times as much 



We also offer the Glidecam 1000 Pro hand-held 
stabilizer for cameras up to 6 pounds, and the Glidecam 
3000 Pro stabilizer for cameras from 4 to 10 pounds 
and the Camcrane 100 boom-arm camera crane 
for cameras weighing up to 20 pounds 



Available at Major Dealers or call Glidecam Industries 

1-800-949-2089 or 1-508-866-2199 



Glidecam is fegistered at the PATENT and TM office 



May 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 13 



What if. 



□ Valuable film or tape was 
lost due to theft, fire or 
faulty processing? 

□ Your technical equipment 
broke down in the middle 



of fil 



ming* 



□ There's an injury or property 
damage on site? 

□ You're sued for film content, 
unauthorized use, or failure 
to obtain clearance? 

□ What if you're not insured? 





INSURANCE BROKERS 



ENTERTAINMENT/MEDIA INSURANCE SPECIALISTS 

Providing short and long-term coverage when you need it to reshoot, repair, and 

protect your products and time. 

CALL FOR A FREE QUOTE TODAY! 

1-800-638-8791 

7411 Old Branch Avenue, P.O. Box 128, Clinton, MD 20735 



RAOUL PECK 



director 
THE AA/VIM BY THE SHORE 

by Yosha Goldstein 




"All sea animals eat up men, but only the 

shark has a had reputation," recites eight-year- 
old Sarah, skipping playfully through her grand- 
mother's attic. As she opens the door to the 
attic's balcony, the serene daylight is abruptly 
offset by a scream from the neighboring yard. 
The girl sees her father standing below with sev- 
eral men over a slumped and brutalized figure; 
he frantically motions her away. 

This primal scene ot agony and betrayal 
repeatedly punctuates the narrative of The Man 
by the Shore, Raoul Peck's third feature, which is 
set in Haiti during the early sixties, when 
Francois "Papa Doc" Duvalicr's regime was con- 
solidating its brutal control. Peck, who is galva- 
nizing Haitian cinema's international presence, 
has been instrumental in developing an inde- 
pendent film community in Haiti by organizing 
screenings and creating opportunities tor tech- 
nical training. 

Born in Haiti in 195 3, Peck emigrated to 
Zaire while still ,1 child, then studied in France 
and Germany, receiving a master's degree in 
industrial economics. Alter working as ,1 jour- 
nalist and photographer, he attended the 
German film and Television Academy in Berlin, 
where he produced a number ot narrative, doc- 



umentary, and experimental shorts. He now 
divides his time between New York, Paris, and 
Port-au-Prince. Peck's cosmopolitanism has 

not diminished his strong connection to Haiti, 
which figures prominently in his cinematic land- 
scape. His first feature, Haitian Comer (1988), 
depicts a Haitian exile, tortured in his homeland 
and struggling to recover from his emotional scars, 
who discovers that his interrogator is working as a 
short-order cook in a nearby restau- 
rant. His next film, Lumumba: Death 
of a Prophet (1992), took him back to 
Africa. The film tells the story of 
Patrice Lumumba's 200- day rule of 
the newly independent Congo 
through an assemblage of documen- 
tary footage, home movies, photos, 
and journalists' recollections. While 
both films have been widely exhibited 
internationally, in the U.S. Lumumba 
has been limited to the festival cir- 
cuit, and Haitian Comer, shot primar- 
ily in New York, only just premiered 
in the city this past winter at the 
Contemporary African Diaspora Film 
Festival. 

Peck returns to the subject of Haiti 
with his latest work. The Man by the 
Shore is an eloquent account of the 
ways in which political oppression can 
saturate one's consciousness and infil- 
trate the details of everyday life. 
Sarah's father is an ineffectual local 
military official whose weaknesses are exploited by 
Janvier, the town's ruthless Tontons Macoute 
(government-supported militia) leader. After 
Sarah's parents are forced to leave the country, she 
and her sisters find refuge in a nearby convent, 
then in their grandmother's attic. The story is 
recalled by an adult Sarah 30 years later, and the 
resonance with Haiti's recent history is pro- 
nounced. Produced shortly after Jean-Bertrand 
Aristide's brief presidency was obstructed by a mil- 
itary coup in 1991, Sarah's story underscores the 
intimate and recurring effects of Duvalicr's 
regime. 

"If you analyze the relationships between the 
different characters, there is always a fine line 
[between power and tear]," remarks Peck, seated 
in his downtown Manhattan apartment. "The 
grandmother plays a game with Janvier where she 
is sometimes very aggressive with him and where 
she sometimes stands back. This is one of the rules 
of the game, because power also needs .i response 

to ii. and you have to know where the line is. For 
me, the thing to remember is that all Haitians are 
playing this game." 

Originally scheduled to film The Man b> the 

Shore in Haiti, the 1991 coup d'etat forced Peck to 
look elsewhere lor locations. He settled on the 




Dominican Republic, working there with the 
Haitian Embassy and Haitian workers' organiza- 
tions to scout locations, cast extras, and hire crew. 
The project was a French/Canadian co-produc- 
tion for which percentages of French and 
Canadians in the crew matched each country's 
contribution to the budget. Concerned with the 
local consequences of the 45-day shoot, however, 
Peck insisted on including a significant number of 
Dominicans and Haitians in the crew. 

The film garnered critical acclaim at Cannes in 
1993, won awards at the Prized Pieces Festival, the 
Milan African Film Festival, and the Human 
Rights Watch Film Festival, and has had extensive 
European distribution. U.S. distributors, however, 
laboring under predetermined and, one might 
argue, outmoded conceptions of niche markets, 
have missed the boat. That is, until KJM3 
Entertainment Group stepped in. This New York- 
based marketing and distribution company, known 
for its innovative work with Julie Dash's Daughters 
of the Dust, acquired the film last fall and is plan- 
ning a platform release beginning this month in 
New York and Miami. KJM3 began building part- 
nerships with such organizations as the Haitian 
Support Network and identifying press contacts in 
the Haitian emigre community in order to culti- 
vate its target audience. Once this base is estab- 
lished, KJM3 plans to develop momentum to 
teach more general audiences. 

"It's nothing new to say that the American 
market is really vet,' closed," Peck observes. "The 
American film industry caused mam problems 
recently at the ( iATT discussions, smnu thai the 
market had to be tree. But they already have 
something like 80 to 90 percent o( the [world] 
market. So it's like saying \"u wan) to have the 
freedom ol a woli in a chicken COOp." 

While organizing a lilm festival in Haiti last 
year, threats ol censorship from a Frent h Haitian 
theatei chain convinced Pec k to pure base a movie 
theatei in Port-au-Prince in order to offei an 
ongoing alternative to the usual action-adventure 

tare. Slated to open latei this summer, the theater 
will be the first in the country to regularly exhibit 
independent and experimental film. It will Jso 
serve as a c ultural celitet lor I I, i it i. in iinu 



May 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 15 




We do it all, from A to Z. 

• Post-production • Duplication 

• Customization • Distribution 



From editing to broadcast and high volume VHS duplication 

to distribution - whatever your needs, Video Dub does it for you! 

So call us today, and get the whole job done. 




mm 



VIDEO DUB INC. 



423 West 55th Street, New York, NY 10019 (212) 757-3300 
235 Pegasus Avenue, Northvale, NJ 07647 (201) 767-7077 

A Video Services Corporation Company 

1-800-88-DUB-IT 



YOUR LIBRARY 

HAVE THE 
INDEPENDENT 

Take this coupon to 

your school or public 

librarian and request a 

subscription today! 



10 issues/yr. 

Library subscription rate $75 

($90 foreign) 

Published by the Foundation for 

Independent Video and Film 

ISSN 0731-0589 

Order from FIVF, 

304 Hudson St., 6th fl., NY, NY 10013; 

(212) 807-1400 

EBSCO: (205) 991-6600; 

fax (205) 991-1479. 

FAXON (US): (800) 283-2966; 

CAN (519) 472-1005; 

CAN fax (519) 472-1072 



• 




^B 



£s#V^*s-1 



XruVH 



fhkr 

■.-*••■■■'-■ 



ORDER THESE BOOKS FROM FIVF 

NEW EDITIONS - ORDER NOW.' 

The ATVF/FIVF Guide to International Film & Video Festivals 

Kathryn Bowser, ed. $29.95 AIVF members; $34.95 others 



The ATVF/FIVF Guide to Film & Video Distributors 

Kathryn Bowser, ed. $19.95 AIVF members; $24.95 others 
$ 

The Next Step: A Film and Video Distribution Handbook 

Morrie Warshawski, ed. $19.95 AIVF members; $24-95 others 



Order all three new editions and save over 25%! Offer 
expires April 30, 1996. $59.95 $ 

Alternative Visions: Distributing Independent Video in a 
Home Video World by Debra Franco; $9.95 AIVF members; 

$12.95 others $ 

Film and Video Financing by Michael Wiese; $22.95 $ 



Film Directing Shot by Shot: Visualizing from Concept to 
Screen by Steven D. Katz; $24-95 $ 

Home Video: Producing for the Home Market by Michael 
Wiese; $11.95 $ == 

The Independent Film & Videomakers Guide by Michael 

Wiese; $13.95 $ 

The RO.V Online Experiment by Don Adams &. Arlene 
Goldbard; $5.00 incl. postage & handling $ 

Shaking the Money Tree: How to Get Grants and Donations 
for Film and Video by Morrie Warshawski; $24.95 $ 

Postage/handling: US - $3.50 1st book, $1.00 ea. addl; 
Foreign - $5.00 1st book, $1.50 ea. addl $ 



TOTAL $ 

Make checks payable to FIVF, 304 Hudson St., 6th ft, 
NY, NY 10013; or charge by phone: (212) 807-1400 
or fax: (2 1 2) 463-8519. 



theater, featuring production workshops and 
encouraging international exchange between 
filmmakers. 

Peck is currently developing several projects, 
including an adaptation of the Russell Banks 
novel Continental Drift (starring Willem Dafoe), 
a program for French television, and a fiction 
film on Lumumba. 

The Man by the Shore: KJM3 Entertainment 
Group, 274 Madison Ave., Ste. 501, New York, 
NY 10016; (212) 689-0950. 

Yosha Goldstein is a freelance writer and independent 
videomaker living in Brooklyn. 



JOSHUA SEFTEL 

XAKIIMG Oisi THE 

KENNEDY5 

by Nan Levinson 




"Dili YOU HUNK II WAS BALANCED? DID 1TOU 
identify with bis girlfriend?" asks Joshua Seftel, 
27, leaning forward with urgency. "It" is Taking 
On the Kennedys, Seftel's third documentary, 
which will be aired on P.O.V. on May 28, and 
the urgency stem-, from both his history of self- 
education and from the charged political cam- 
paign the work documents. 

In 1994. Seftel heard thai Kevin Vigilante, a 



doctor he knew slightly, was running as a 
Republican candidate for an open congressional 
seat in Rhode Island against Democrat Patrick 
Kennedy, son of Massachusetts Senator Ted Ken- 
nedy. Seftel proposed shadowing Vigilante and 
shooting his 1994 campaign. Intrigued, Vigilante 
agreed to a brief trial period. 

"I went in not knowing who was going to win," 
Seftel says, "But one thing I did know was that I 
had a story that had two elements Americans 
love: the underdog and the closest thing we have 
to American royalty." Better yet, the story was 
unfolding in Rhode Island, a state infamous for its 
dicey politics and also convenient to Seftel's home 
in the Boston suburb of Somerville. 

Seftel's original plan was to shoot some sample 
footage and shop it around for funding, but as he 
tells it, "I shot for ten days, and I said I don't care 
if I can raise the money. I can tell that this is going 
to be great." Credit cards and determination got 
him through six months of filming, and he even- 
tually received support for the $100,000 film from 
the Independent Television Service, PBS, and a 
New England Regional Fellow- 
ship through the now defunct 
NEA regional regrant program. 
At the video's start, Vigilante 
appears as an idealist and a 
straight arrow. We sec him talk- 
ing compassionately with HIV- 
positive women at the clinic he 
established, watch him explain 
to a reporter that it was his frus- 
tration with how little gets 
accomplished by politicians that 
motivated him to run, and hear 
him vow of his campaign, "I'm 
not gonna make it dirty." 
It's a pledge he's destined to 
break. Only when the campaign 
turns nasty — with Vigilante 
harping on Kennedy's past 
cocaine addiction and Kennedy 
accusing Vigilante of financing 
hi-* medical education through a 
lawsuit against an elderly 
woman — does Vigilante ad- 
vance in the polls. I he video, 
like the campaign, gives short 
shritt to the candidates' plat- 
forms, focusing primarily on 
their TV ads. "That's what really shaped the race 
and I think that's what's shaping all major races 
today," Settel says, insisting thai their political dif- 
ferences are nol important to the video. "It's more 

about a man Vigilante — who decided to run lor 
office, and Ills political education." 

Working alone, Seltel shot KS5 hours of 
footage. He rigged a field monitor and a Senn- 
heiser microphone to his Hi8 camera so he would 



be relatively mobile and unobtrusive, which 
became important as the campaign heated up. 
Though Vigilante kept his word to give the direc- 
tor access to him and his staff, Seftel acknowl- 
edged that "there were moments when they asked 
me to turn the camera off. That was part of the 
deal: that they would be able to call time outs. 
[But] during crises, the last thing on their minds 
was the guy in the corner with the camera." 

Vigilante lost by 10 percentage points, but the 
bleakness of Taking On the Kennedys cuts deeper 
than a failed campaign, documenting a morally 
bankrupt system in which ideas, beliefs, and pur- 
pose, if they matter at all, are a lot less influential 
than the ads that amounted to not much more 
than slickly-packaged mud- slinging. 

Seftel tells this story primarily through cinema 
verite. The many interviews he did went unused, 
he explains, because "I decided in editing that the 
true moments that spoke were the verite 
moments. A filmmaker's dream is to illustrate an 
idea through action." 

That insight, like most of Seftel's production 
training, came on the job. In 1990, armed with a 
B.A. in French literature and pre-med, a single 
film course, and one short student film, he wrote 
to every major production house in Boston and 
New York looking for work. Not surprisingly, noth- 
ing happened. Instead, from a whole other direc- 
tion, someone offered him the chance to make a 
documentary as part of the first American relief 
team to visit Romanian orphanages. All he had to 
do was supply the equipment, the money, and the 
know-how. 

Undaunted, Seftel raised $2,000 and embarked 
on a quick self-study course in filmmaking, teach- 
ing himself to edit by watching a few films over 
and over (including The Congress, by Ken Burns 
and Jack Levine: Feast of Pure Reason, by David 
Sutherland) until he understood the reason tor 
each cut. He met the challenge and produced Lost 
and Found: The Story of Romania's Forgotten 
Children, nominated for an Emmy in 1995, the 
first Hi8 documentary to be so honored. Seftel's 
second work, Old Warrior: Frank Manning and the 
Senior Power Movement, won the 1995 National 
Media Owl Award. 

"It's always been a struggle," he says, more 
bemused than bitter. "I don't think things tall into 
your lap in filmmaking, at least they haven'l tor 

me. I couldn't net a job, and I bad to Create tin 

own." But things have ultimately worked oui foi 
him. "In some ways, that's a lot ol filmmakers' 

dream," he notes, "to be able to tell your ow n 

in youi own way ^\^\ have ii be seen In a lot ol 

people." 

|S Film and Video Production, 25 Warnei s '.. 

#2, Somerville, MA 02144. (617) 776-7009. 

.Van Levinson, a freelance writer m Boston, is writing a 
hixik ahmt people involved m free expression < onftu t\ 



May 1996 THE INDEPENDENT 17 



mm 



NON-LINEAR 

EDITING 



MEDIA 100 SYSTEM 

• True broadcast-quaiity 

• "Off-line" and "On-line" with 
"All-On-One"™ mastering 

• Multi-track, 16-bit, 44.1kHz 
(CD-quality) audio mixing 

• CG, Color FX, Motion FX 

• BetaSP Deck 



PLUS... 

ANIMATED 
GRAPHICS, 
KEYS& 
COMPOGmMG 




AFWR 
EFFECTS! 




INC. 



1212)226-1152 

• COMPETITIVE RATES 

• CALL FOR FREE CONSULTATION 



THE 




A non-profit media arts organi- 
zation providing access to state- 
of-the-art video post-production 
services for artists and indepen- 
dent producers at drastically 
discounted rates ™ Wide range 
of services available ™ Standby 
publishes FELIX, A Journal of 
Media Arts and Communication. 



Some of Standby's hourly rates: 

• Interformat editing: $85 

• One inch editing: $120 

• Non-linear editing: $60 

• Audio post-production: $60 

• Chyron: $10 

• ADO: $10 

First extra service free! 



PO Box 184, Prince Street Station 
New York, NY 10012 
Phone: (212)219-0951 
Fax: (212)219-0563 



& JACK LEWIS 

-festival czcxHrectonrs 

OUTSTANDING 

SOUTH AFRICAN 

GAY & LESBIAN 

FILA/l FESTIVAL 

By Catherine Saalfield 




Nelson Mandela is president. The boycott is 
over. Cultural workers from all over the world are 
being encouraged to participate in a new society. 
Dreams and lessons waft about like the cigarette 
smoke rising above the heads of Nodi Murphy and 
Jack Lewis, cocurators of the Outstanding South 
African Gay and Lesbian Film Festival. As we sit 
in a cafe around the corner from the Johannesburg 
venue of their second annual festival (November 
2-30, 1995), they drink more coffee than the FDA 
allows. 

Murphy and Lewis have brought me to South 
Africa to present my video work and that of the 
lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth I 
teach at the Hetrick-Martin Institute in 
Manhattan. Other foreign guests included Lauran 
Hoffman (Bar Girls), John Greyson {Urinal), and 
Pratibha Parmar (Warrior Marks). Over coffee, my 
hosts are wired, bickering, and exhibiting all the 
signs of being codirectors in the third week of a 
festival that is fueled less by money than by enthu- 
siasm. The film program has already made the 
rounds to Pretoria, Durban, and Cape Town. 

It all started in 1991, when Lewis began 
exhibiting feature films on video in townships out- 



side Cape Town. He'd screen several in a ro